The In-Laws


1h 38m 2003

Brief Synopsis

When prospective fathers-in-law Steve Tobias and Jerry Peyser meet for the first time to celebrate their children's upcoming marriage, the cake hits the fan. Dr. Jerome Peyser is a mild-mannered podiatrist with a well-organized daily routine designed to eliminate all possible sources of stress. Mean

Film Details

Also Known As
In Laws, The, In-Laws, Til Death Do Us Part, Till Death Do Us Part, Wedding Party
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2003
Production Company
Pat Cassin
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Chicago, Illinois, USA; Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Synopsis

When prospective fathers-in-law Steve Tobias and Jerry Peyser meet for the first time to celebrate their children's upcoming marriage, the cake hits the fan. Dr. Jerome Peyser is a mild-mannered podiatrist with a well-organized daily routine designed to eliminate all possible sources of stress. Meanwhile, daredevil CIA operative Steve Tobias moves through life like a heat-seeking missile. His average day consists of dodging bullets, stealing private jets and negotiating with international arms smugglers. Now he's giving potential father-of-the-bride Jerry a serious case of pre-nuptial jitters. Steve's dramatic entrances and exits, his cryptic references to a Russian runaway named Olga and his fight with a gunman in a restaurant washroom causes Jerry to see a vision of his daughter's perfectly planned wedding blowing up in his face. As far as Jerry's concerned, letting Steve into his family takes "til death do us part" way too literally. Before he can say the wedding is off, Jerry suddenly finds himself embroiled in the chaos that follows in Steve's wake as he is dragged kicking and screaming into a series of perilous adventures that take the mismatched in-laws-to-be halfway around the world.

Crew

Nick Alachiotis

Stunt Player

Kevin Alakas

Accounting Assistant

Gerry Alfonso

Accountant

Muzaffar Ali

Song

Fran Allgood

Costumer

David T. Altenau

Cg Supervisor

Janine Anderton

Production Manager

Janine Anderton

Production Coordinator

James M Arnett

Unit Director

Taryn Ash

Stunt Player

Burt Bacharach

Song

Nicholas M Bacon

Dolly Grip

Klaus Badelt

Song

Klaus Badelt

Music

Chris Bailey

Animation Supervisor

Clare Bambrough

Assistant Editor

Brittany Banks

Stunt Player

Floyd Banks

Digital Effects

Bridgett Baron

Accountant

Pierre Barough

Song

Stan Barua

Camera Operator

Jerry Beaudrow

Carpenter

Doug Bell

Grip

Wilfred C Bell

Transportation Captain

Anne Berger

Assistant Director

Frenchie Berger

Props

Alan Bergman

Song

Andrew Bergman

Other

Marilyn Bergman

Song

Julianne Berkowitz

Assistant

Luc Bernard

Accounting Assistant

Michelle Berrigan

Production Secretary

James Binkley

Stunt Player

Kingsuk Biswas

Song Performer

Kingsuk Biswas

Song

James Blacker

Location Manager

Larry Blackman

Song

Deryck Blake

Property Master

Nicole Blanchard

Assistant Camera

Simon Board

Assistant Director

Jerry Bock

Song

Samuel Bojin

Best Boy

Brigitte Bourque

Compositing Supervisor

Gary Bower

Grip

Bill Boyd

Transportation Captain

Kevin P. Boyd

Video

Brady Breen

Location Manager

Melissa Brockman Kalmus

Visual Effects Producer

Ann Brodie

Makeup

Peter Brown

Song

Whitney Brown

Unit Production Manager

Jack Bruce

Song

Brad Bunn

Stunt Player

Cori Burchell

Assistant Costume Designer

Brian Burks

Animator

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutter

Krystin Butcher

Stunt Player

Randy Butcher

Stunt Player

Luisa Cabiddu

Extras Casting Assistant

Joanne Camacho

Other

Dan Caplan

Storyboard Artist

Bryn Caron

Assistant Director

Elizabeth Caruana

Camera Trainee

Bruce Carwardine

Sound Mixer

Harry Wayne Casey

Song

Louise Casey

Craft Service

Pat Cassin

Cable Operator

Mike Castillo

Digital Effects Artist

Chris Champion

Rigging Grip

Elizabeth Charlton

Stunt Player

Kirk Cheney

Construction

Tommy Cheng

Stunt Player

Wally Chin

Rotoscope Animator

Ho Chow

Stunt Player

Eric Clapton

Song

Kevin Clark

Visual Effects Editor

Janet Clay

Stunt Player

David Coatsworth

Unit Production Manager

David Coatsworth

Coproducer

John Cocks

Driver

Todd Constantine

Assistant

Jane Conway

Animal Wrangler

Shelley Cook

Stunt Player

Gilles Corbeil

Camera Operator

Jordan Corngold

Music Editor

Carole Costello

Costume Coordinator

Anais Cruz

Song

George Cunningham

Assistant Editor

Joe Curtin

Construction Coordinator

Maureen Curtin

Costume Supervisor

Jonathan Cuthbert

Production Assistant

Gerrit Dangremond

Camera Operator

Dennis Davenport

Art Director

Hal David

Song

Valerie Davidson

Foley Editor

Jon Davis

Art Assistant

Patrick Davis

Location Assistant

Robert L Davis

Coordinator

Richard Dean

Makeup Artist

September Death

Assistant Director

David Demarinis

On-Set Dresser

Ralph Denson

Production Supervisor

Kyle Devriendt

Visual Effects Editor

Marco Di Flaviano

Location Assistant

Demetra Diamantopoulos

Project Manager

Eduardo Dicapua

Song

Pam Dixon Mickelson

Casting

Terry Dodd

Other

Jake Donahoe

Post-Production Accountant

Scott Donais

Painter

Melanie Donkers

Production Assistant

Maxine Dumont

Stunt Player

Allen Dunlop

Stand-In

Bernard Edwards

Song

Lisa Maria El Khazen

Product Placement

Danny Elfman

Song

Danny Elfman

Music Composer

David Evans

Dresser

Petra Evers

Technical Director

Deborah Everton

Costume Designer

Alex Falovo

Production Assistant

Tom Farr

Stunt Player

Arthur Fiedler

Music Conductor

Richard Finch

Song

Dawn Fisher

Assistant Art Director

Ella Fitzgerald

Song Performer

Gary Flanigan

Driver

Andrew Fleming

Other

David E Fluhr

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Rick Forsayeth

Stunt Coordinator

Martin Franklin

Song

Michael Franklin

Post-Production Assistant

David Fremlin

Assistant Art Director

R Michael Gabourie

Transportation Captain

Andrew Gainor

Assistant Location Manager

Howard Galbraith

Best Boy Electric

Michael Galbraith

Gaffer

Alex Garcia

Assistant Editor

Jason Gates

Transportation

Edward Gathercole

Other

Roland Gauvin

Rigging Grip

Nick Gazda

Assistant Art Director

Bill Gerber

Producer

Jonathan Gerber

Technical Director

Eric Gerrard

Camera Operator

Barry Gibb

Song

Maurice Gibb

Song

Robin Gibb

Song

Daniel Gibson

Special Effects

Emile Godin

Special Effects

Wally Gold

Song

Mia Goldman

Editor

Andrew Goldstein

Background Painter

Glen Goodchild

Best Boy Grip

Wayne Goodchild

Key Grip

Ron Goodman

Camera Operator

Ron Goodwin

Song Performer

Nicole Gorsuch

Assistant Costume Designer

Bert Gouweleeuw

Key Grip

Mike Gow

Stunt Player

Conrad Gozzo

Song

Alexander Gruszynski

Director Of Photography

Gabriel Guy

Dubbing Mixer

Laura Guzik

Costume Supervisor

Harry Haase

Construction Coordinator

Ian Hall

Product Placement

Michael Hall

Camera Operator

Peter Ham

Song

Marvin Hamlisch

Song

Jeffrey Hammond

Other

Bob Hannah

Electrician

David Harcourt

Rigging Grip

Shaughnessy Hare

Assistant Sound Editor

Carol Hartwick

Hair Stylist

Oliver Hengst

Executive Producer

Craig Henighan

Sound Effects Editor

Berenicci Hershorn

Apprentice Editor

John Hewitt

Cg Supervisor

Curtis Hibbert

Stunt Player

John Hobson

Camera Operator

Chuck Hodes

Photography

Libby Hodgson

Assistant Director

Perry Hoffman

Camera Operator

Bill Hogan

Transportation

Aaron C Holden

Property Master

Chris Holmes

Digital Effects Artist

Larry Holofcener

Song

Dawn Howat

Accounting Assistant

Kevin Howe

Assistant Director

Debbie Howes

Security

Mark Hryma

Camera Operator

John Hudacek

Dolly Grip

Jon Hunter

Graphic Artist

Arkay Hur

Background Painter

Gretchen Husting

Extras Casting Assistant

Charles Martin Inouye

Music Editor

Ibne Insha

Music Lyrics

Kevin Janus

Rights & Clearances

Erin Jarvis

Stunt Player

Paul Jefferson

Carpenter

Film Details

Also Known As
In Laws, The, In-Laws, Til Death Do Us Part, Till Death Do Us Part, Wedding Party
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2003
Production Company
Pat Cassin
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Chicago, Illinois, USA; Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Articles

The In-Laws


Judging by the tepid box-office response that The In-Laws (2003) met with upon its release last spring, it seems like the moviegoing public voted with its wallet as to the necessity of remaking the enduringly popular 1979 Peter Falk/Alan Arkin buddy farce. It's unfortunate, as the Michael Douglas/Albert Brooks redo now available on DVD from Warner Home Video is a not unpleasant light entertainment, and will hopefully meet a better fate in the home video market.

The narrative's set over an extremely long weekend in the life of Steve Tobias (Douglas), deep-cover CIA operative and absentee dad. Steve's stuck trying to broker a multinational sting while heading to Chicago for the wedding of his barely forgiving son Mark (Ryan Reynolds) and his fiancee Melissa (Lindsay Sloane). Compounding the awkwardness is the first meeting with the father of the bride; Jerry Peyser (Brooks), a fussy, insular podiatrist, is instantly wary of "copier salesman" Steve's gladhanding front and abrupt disappearances.

Jerry's distrust kicks into overdrive once he's hauled in FBI agents who've been monitoring Steve's activities. Steve's left with no other response than to rescue the disbelieving doctor from the feds and shanghai him along for an overseas rendezvous with the manic French drug runner Thibodoux (Davis Suchet). The riotous challenges in escaping certain death, to say nothing of getting to the reception on time, take the story to its conclusion.

Screenwriters Nat Mauldin and Ed Solomon did a creditable job of lifting Andrew Bergman's high concept and little else in drafting their rewrite, and director Andrew Fleming (The Craft, Dick) gave a polished, straightforward effort in the presentation. The covert world that Steve Tobias inhabits is understandably rendered in higher tech and higher gloss than that of Falk's Vince Ricardo in the original of a generation past. Fleming described the sought-after look in his commentary as a "Scott Brothers movie," and it makes the contrast with the muted depiction of Jerry's mundane existence all the more striking. The title roles make a comfortable fit for the two leads, with Douglas well-suited to the aging man of action and Brooks in familiar territory as the risk-averse nebbish. Moreover, they demonstrate a decent comic rapport, which keeps The In-Laws entertaining even when the script veers into the overindulgent or the overfamiliar.

The supporting players are also game. Suchet's supervillain isn't as outrageously around the bend as Richard Libertini's in the original, but it's measured, funny work, with his struggles in coming to grips with a homosexual attraction to Brooks standing out. Candice Bergen gets a lot out of a little screen time as Douglas' strident, New Age-y ex-wife, and Reynolds and Sloane are sufficiently sympathetic as the beleaguered couple-to-be. Robin Tunney gives a nice effort as Douglas' spy-grrrl protege, despite the fact that the script does her no favors in the last few reels.

Warner has released The In-Laws in both full-screen and widescreen editions, with the latter presented in the original theatrical 1.85:1 aspect ratio. The mastering and the Dolby Surround 5.1 audio are exceptionally clean. The extras menu is less substantial than appears on first blush. Fleming's full-length commentary is the highlight, and while he provides sufficient insights to make it worth the listen, the dead space is noticeable. Rounding things out are the film's gag reel (only so-so); three deleted scenes; two intriguing sequences of Brooks at work, as the camera keeps rolling through multiple takes; and the theatrical trailers for both the '79 and '03 versions.

For more information about The In-Laws, visit Warner Video. To order The In-Laws, go to TCM Shopping.

by Jay S. Steinberg
The In-Laws

The In-Laws

Judging by the tepid box-office response that The In-Laws (2003) met with upon its release last spring, it seems like the moviegoing public voted with its wallet as to the necessity of remaking the enduringly popular 1979 Peter Falk/Alan Arkin buddy farce. It's unfortunate, as the Michael Douglas/Albert Brooks redo now available on DVD from Warner Home Video is a not unpleasant light entertainment, and will hopefully meet a better fate in the home video market. The narrative's set over an extremely long weekend in the life of Steve Tobias (Douglas), deep-cover CIA operative and absentee dad. Steve's stuck trying to broker a multinational sting while heading to Chicago for the wedding of his barely forgiving son Mark (Ryan Reynolds) and his fiancee Melissa (Lindsay Sloane). Compounding the awkwardness is the first meeting with the father of the bride; Jerry Peyser (Brooks), a fussy, insular podiatrist, is instantly wary of "copier salesman" Steve's gladhanding front and abrupt disappearances. Jerry's distrust kicks into overdrive once he's hauled in FBI agents who've been monitoring Steve's activities. Steve's left with no other response than to rescue the disbelieving doctor from the feds and shanghai him along for an overseas rendezvous with the manic French drug runner Thibodoux (Davis Suchet). The riotous challenges in escaping certain death, to say nothing of getting to the reception on time, take the story to its conclusion. Screenwriters Nat Mauldin and Ed Solomon did a creditable job of lifting Andrew Bergman's high concept and little else in drafting their rewrite, and director Andrew Fleming (The Craft, Dick) gave a polished, straightforward effort in the presentation. The covert world that Steve Tobias inhabits is understandably rendered in higher tech and higher gloss than that of Falk's Vince Ricardo in the original of a generation past. Fleming described the sought-after look in his commentary as a "Scott Brothers movie," and it makes the contrast with the muted depiction of Jerry's mundane existence all the more striking. The title roles make a comfortable fit for the two leads, with Douglas well-suited to the aging man of action and Brooks in familiar territory as the risk-averse nebbish. Moreover, they demonstrate a decent comic rapport, which keeps The In-Laws entertaining even when the script veers into the overindulgent or the overfamiliar. The supporting players are also game. Suchet's supervillain isn't as outrageously around the bend as Richard Libertini's in the original, but it's measured, funny work, with his struggles in coming to grips with a homosexual attraction to Brooks standing out. Candice Bergen gets a lot out of a little screen time as Douglas' strident, New Age-y ex-wife, and Reynolds and Sloane are sufficiently sympathetic as the beleaguered couple-to-be. Robin Tunney gives a nice effort as Douglas' spy-grrrl protege, despite the fact that the script does her no favors in the last few reels. Warner has released The In-Laws in both full-screen and widescreen editions, with the latter presented in the original theatrical 1.85:1 aspect ratio. The mastering and the Dolby Surround 5.1 audio are exceptionally clean. The extras menu is less substantial than appears on first blush. Fleming's full-length commentary is the highlight, and while he provides sufficient insights to make it worth the listen, the dead space is noticeable. Rounding things out are the film's gag reel (only so-so); three deleted scenes; two intriguing sequences of Brooks at work, as the camera keeps rolling through multiple takes; and the theatrical trailers for both the '79 and '03 versions. For more information about The In-Laws, visit Warner Video. To order The In-Laws, go to TCM Shopping. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States May 2003

Released in United States on Video October 7, 2003

Released in United States Summer May 23, 2003

Shown at Tribeca Film Festival (World Premiere) May 3-11, 2003.

Remake of "The In-Laws" (USA/1979), directed by Arthur Hiller and starring Peter Falk and Alan Arkin.

Donald Petrie was previously attached to direct.

Released in United States May 2003 (Shown at Tribeca Film Festival (World Premiere) May 3-11, 2003.)

Released in United States Summer May 23, 2003

Released in United States on Video October 7, 2003