The Woman Chaser


1h 36m 1999

Brief Synopsis

Richard is a L.A. used car salesman on a quest to find the true meaning of his life. When he turns over his car lot to his inept assistants, he begins to write his first screenplay -- a woeful tale about a truck driver who runs over a little girl and gets shot to death trying to outrun the law. Whe

Film Details

Also Known As
Woman Chaser
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Inwood Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Synopsis

Richard is a L.A. used car salesman on a quest to find the true meaning of his life. When he turns over his car lot to his inept assistants, he begins to write his first screenplay -- a woeful tale about a truck driver who runs over a little girl and gets shot to death trying to outrun the law. When Mammoth Pictures shows interest in the script, he must scramble to get it made, enlisting an assortment of oddball characters, including his washed-up, ex-filmmaker father, his lustful stepsister and his pregnant secretary, as his crew.

Film Details

Also Known As
Woman Chaser
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Inwood Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Articles

Eugene Roche (1928-2004)


Eugene Roche, the marvelous character actor who had a knack for shining in offbeat roles, such as Edgar Derby, ill-fated prisoner of war in Slaughterhouse Five (1972), and the murderous archbishop in Foul Play (1978), died in Encino, California of a heart attack on July 28. He was 75.

Born on September 22, 1928, in Boston, Massachusettes, Roche began his career when he was still in High School, doing voice characterization on radio in his native Boston. After he graduated, he served in the Army, then studied drama on the G.I. bill at Emerson College. Concentrating on acting, he found much stage work in San Francisco in the early `50s, then headed for New York in the early `60s and began appearing on televison (Naked City, Route 66) and on Broadway. 

It wasn't until he was in his forties did Roche began to get really good parts. His open, friendly face and stocky build made him the ideal choice to play the likable POW, Edgar Derby in Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five. His role as Edgar who saves an intact porcelain figurine from the ruins of Dresden only to be executed by his German captors for looting, may have been brief, but it was instantly memorable. Fine roles continued to come his way in films throughout the decade, the highlights included: They Might Be Giants (1971), Mr. Ricco (1975), The Late Show (1977), Corvette Summer (a deft comic performance as a high school auto shop teacher who is secretly running a car theft ring), and Foul Play (both 1978).

Yet, it would be on television where Roche would find lasting success. He became a household face when, as Squeaky Clean, he became the spokesman for Ajax household cleaner. Then he struck gold in sitcoms: Archie Bunker's practical joking nemesis, Pinky Peterson on All in the Family (1976-78), the madly romantic attorney, Ronald Mallu on Soap (1978-81), and the lovable landlord Bill Parker on Webster (1984-86).

Roche is survived by his wife, Anntoni; his brother, John; his sister, Clara Hewes; nine children, one of which, a son Eamonn, is a successful working actor; and nine grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Eugene Roche (1928-2004)

Eugene Roche (1928-2004)

Eugene Roche, the marvelous character actor who had a knack for shining in offbeat roles, such as Edgar Derby, ill-fated prisoner of war in Slaughterhouse Five (1972), and the murderous archbishop in Foul Play (1978), died in Encino, California of a heart attack on July 28. He was 75. Born on September 22, 1928, in Boston, Massachusettes, Roche began his career when he was still in High School, doing voice characterization on radio in his native Boston. After he graduated, he served in the Army, then studied drama on the G.I. bill at Emerson College. Concentrating on acting, he found much stage work in San Francisco in the early `50s, then headed for New York in the early `60s and began appearing on televison (Naked City, Route 66) and on Broadway.  It wasn't until he was in his forties did Roche began to get really good parts. His open, friendly face and stocky build made him the ideal choice to play the likable POW, Edgar Derby in Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five. His role as Edgar who saves an intact porcelain figurine from the ruins of Dresden only to be executed by his German captors for looting, may have been brief, but it was instantly memorable. Fine roles continued to come his way in films throughout the decade, the highlights included: They Might Be Giants (1971), Mr. Ricco (1975), The Late Show (1977), Corvette Summer (a deft comic performance as a high school auto shop teacher who is secretly running a car theft ring), and Foul Play (both 1978). Yet, it would be on television where Roche would find lasting success. He became a household face when, as Squeaky Clean, he became the spokesman for Ajax household cleaner. Then he struck gold in sitcoms: Archie Bunker's practical joking nemesis, Pinky Peterson on All in the Family (1976-78), the madly romantic attorney, Ronald Mallu on Soap (1978-81), and the lovable landlord Bill Parker on Webster (1984-86). Roche is survived by his wife, Anntoni; his brother, John; his sister, Clara Hewes; nine children, one of which, a son Eamonn, is a successful working actor; and nine grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of a Special Jury Prize at the 2000 Florida Film Festival.

Released in United States 1999

Released in United States 2000

Released in United States January 2000

Released in United States July 21, 2000

Released in United States June 2000

Released in United States Summer June 14, 2000

Shown at Florida Film Festival (in competition) June 8-19, 2000.

Shown at New York Film Festival September 24 - October 10, 1999.

Shown at Seattle International Film Festival May 18 - June 11, 2000.

Shown at Sundance Film Festival (American Spectrum) January 20-30, 2000.

Released in United States 1999 (Shown at New York Film Festival September 24 - October 10, 1999.)

Released in United States 2000 (Shown at Seattle International Film Festival May 18 - June 11, 2000.)

Released in United States January 2000 (Shown at Sundance Film Festival (American Spectrum) January 20-30, 2000.)

Feature directorial debut for Robinson Devor.

Released in United States June 2000 (Shown at Florida Film Festival (in competition) June 8-19, 2000.)

Released in United States Summer June 14, 2000

Released in United States July 21, 2000 (Nuart; Los Angeles)