The Times of Harvey Milk


1h 27m 1984
The Times of Harvey Milk

Brief Synopsis

This documentary focuses on the successful career and assassination of San Francisco's first elected gay councilor.

Film Details

Also Known As
Times of Harvey Milk
Genre
Documentary
Historical
Political
Interview
Release Date
1984
Distribution Company
Cinecom International Films/New Yorker Films; Cinecom International FilmsNew Yorker Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m

Synopsis

The life story of the visionary and charismatic political activist Harvey Milk. Milk was the first openly gay candidate ever elected to political office in California, but after only serving eleven months as city supervisor of San Francisco, Milk, along with the popular mayor George Moscone, was assassinated by deranged ex-supervisor Dan White. White's unusually lenient sentencing for double murder (five and one-half years with no psychiatric counseling) based in part on his now infamous "Twinkie defense" (junk food altered his brain chemistry), provoked violence and rioting from an outraged public.

Crew

Peter Adair

Consultant

Peter Adair

Photography

Tom Ammiano

Other

Samuel Barber

Music

Gary Becker

Animator

John Benson

Sound Editor

Teresa Bergman

Production Assistant

Allan Berube

Consultant

Greg Bex

Associate Producer

Arthur Bressan

Photography

Sara Chin

Sound

Judith Coburn

Other

Randall Coleman

Production Assistant

Henry Der

Other

Lee Dichter

Sound

Cheryl Drake

Consultant

Doug Dunderdale

Camera Operator

Inc Earle-tones Music

Producer

Jim Elliot

Other

Jon Else

Photography

Robert Epstein

Editor

Robert Epstein

Special Thanks To

Jeffrey Friedman

Animator

Robert Galloway

Production Assistant

Tracy Gary

Consultant

Kennan P Gault

Consultant

Sally Gearhart

Other

Ellen Geiger

Consultant

Dan Gleich

Sound

Tory Hartmann

Other

Robert Hawk

Archival Footage

Lora Hirschberg

Sound

Lora Hirschberg

Audio

Lora Hirschberg

Special Thanks To

Deborah Hoffman

Editor

David Hollander

Consultant

Mary Ann Hutson

Production Assistant

Mark Isham

Audio

Mark Isham

Music

Kathy Kline

Line Producer

Chris Kogler

Animator

Bill Kraus

Other

Anne Kronenberg

Other

Jonel Larson

Production Assistant

Terry Lawler

Consultant

Michael Levin

Sound

Ross Lipman

Sound

Peter Lowy

Consultant

David Loxton

Executive Producer

Ellen Martin

Production Assistant

Dennis Mcgowan

Production Assistant

Tim Mckenna

Song

Michael Mcneil

Animator

Michael Mcneil

Art Director

Michael Mcneil

Titles

Michael Mcneil

Production Designer

Harvey Milk

Other

Nancy Morita

Camera Operator

Dolores Neuman

Consultant

Emiko Omori

Photography

Peter Oreckinto

Audio

Dick Pabich

Consultant

John Polito

Audio

Frances Reid

Other

Frances Reid

Cinematographer

Vito Russo

Consultant

Tony Russomanno

Consultant

Whitney Saik

Special Thanks To

Richard Schmiechen

Producer

Randy Sellgren

Music

Thomas E. Shea

Camera Operator

Thomas E. Shea

Assistant Editor

Scott Smith

Consultant

Elizabeth Stevens

Sound

Carter Wilson

Other

Tip Wirrick

Song

John Wright

Consultant

John Wright

Production Assistant

Jeannine Yeomans

Other

Wendy Zheutlin

Researcher

Film Details

Also Known As
Times of Harvey Milk
Genre
Documentary
Historical
Political
Interview
Release Date
1984
Distribution Company
Cinecom International Films/New Yorker Films; Cinecom International FilmsNew Yorker Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m

Award Wins

Best Documentary Feature

1984

Articles

The Times of Harvey Milk -


Celebrate the life of "the most famous human rights champion the LGBT community has ever had" (Stuart Milk, "Harvey's Enduring Legacy") in this acclaimed documentary. Combining archival footage with original interviews featuring Milk's contemporaries, award-winning producer Rob Epstein captures Milk's spirit and the spirit of time and place -- San Francisco in the 1970s -- that made his rise to prominence possible. The 1984 film is now considered a classic, the first overtly gay film to win the Oscar® for Best Documentary, and a foundational work in this history of the LGBT community on film.

Milk was the first openly gay man to win an election for public office in California. He had moved to San Francisco from New York like many young gay men of the era, drawn by the promise of a more tolerant society. There he opened a camera shop in the city's gay district centering on Castro Street. His interest in politics, particularly the rights of LGBT peoples and small business owners, grew, led him to run for the city's Board of Supervisors, a position he finally won in 1977. As a city supervisor, he sponsored major civil rights legislation and campaigned successfully against state legislator John Briggs's ballot initiative to ban gay men, lesbians and their supporters from working in the state's public schools. Less than a year into his term, however, he and San Francisco Mayor George Moscone were assassinated by former supervisor Dan White on November 27, 1978. Milk's death triggered a massive candlelight rally in his memory, followed months later by riots when White was let off with a reduced sentence. Despite his death, however, his memory and his message of hope and inclusiveness have lived on as a demonstration of the powerful political clout of LGBT voters.

That was the message Epstein ultimately hoped to send out with his documentary on Milk. As a young gay man, Epstein had gravitated to San Francisco because of its reputation as a gay mecca. Although initially he had no real interest in film, he landed a job at the Mariposa Film Group, where he helped make the seminal gay documentary Word Is Out: Stories of Some of Our Lives (1977). For his next project, he and his Mariposa mentor, Peter Adair, started work on a short film about the Briggs Initiative. That put him in touch with Milk. When the city supervisor was killed three weeks after defeating the Briggs Initiative, Epstein decided to focus his entire film on the man.

Milk's death also changed the nature of the film. In the words of critic B. Ruby Rich, the film had started out as a "grassroots documentary chronicle." Epstein initially filmed the campaign against the Briggs Initiative in the thick of the action, following Milk as he debated Briggs and personally campaigned to sway voters against the ballot measure. With Milk's death, it became more an analysis of his political career and its impact on the nation. Epstein contacted many of the man's political and business associates for interviews and enlisted journalist Judith Coburn and novelist Carter Wilson to write a narration, eventually recorded by actor-playwright and four-time Tony winner Harvey Fierstein. He financed the film through a series of house parties where he showed portions of the unfinished film to raise money for its completion. He also used those parties to get insight on what needed to be included to help the film speak to the needs of people, gay and straight, around the nation.

Focus Film picked the film up for distribution and premiered it, quite appropriately, at the Castro Theatre. They even contributed to the restoration of that historical theatre in the Castro District. The Times of Harvey Milk was met with strong praise from critics. In The Chicago Sun-Times, Roger Ebert called it "an enormously absorbing film, for the light it sheds on a decade in the life of a great American city and on the lives of Milk and Moscone, who made it a better, and certainly a more interesting, place to live." In addition to the Oscar®, the film won awards from the New York Film Critics, Boston Society of Film Critics, the International Documentary Association, the San Francisco International Lesbian & Gay Film Festival and Sundance. When it aired on television, it was honored with an Emmy and a Peabody Award. In 2012, it was voted a place on the National Film Registry.

But the film's legacy reaches beyond mere awards. It launched Epstein's career, leading to a second Oscar®-winning documentary, Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt (1989), the acclaimed documentary The Celluloid Closet (1995), based on Vito Russo's seminal history of gay images in motion pictures, and his first dramatic film, Howl (2010), inspired by Allen Ginsburg's most famous poem and starring James Franco. When California's anti-marriage equality initiative, Proposition 8, passed in 2008, activists fighting for its repeal turned to his first great film, The Times of Harvey Milk, to learn how to organize what would prove to be a successful opposition.

All of that is matched by the considerable legacy of the film's subject. The intersection of Market and Castro in San Francisco was renamed Harvey Milk Plaza, and the city's Gay Democratic Club changed its name to the Harvey Milk Memorial Gay Democratic Club. A New York City school for LGBT youth at risk was founded in 1985 and named the Harvey Milk School. In 2009, his nephew, Stuart Milk, accepted a Presidential Medal of Freedom on his uncle's behalf from President Barack Obama. He and Epstein then screened The Times of Harvey Milk in the White House. The same year, Stuart Milk and his uncle's campaign manager, Anne Kronenberg, co-founded the Harvey Milk Foundation to spread Milk's message of hope, acceptance and inclusion. And California officially declared May 22 Harvey Milk Recognition Day.

By Frank Miller

Producer: Rob Epstein, Richard Schmiechen
Director: Rob Epstein
Screenplay: Judith Coburn, Carter Wilson
Cinematography: Frances Reid
Score: Mark Isham
Cast: Harvey Fierstein (Narrator), Harvey Milk (Himself, archive footage), Anne Kronenberg, Tory Hartmann, Tom Ammiano, Jim Elliot, Sally M. Gearhart (Themselves)
The Times Of Harvey Milk -

The Times of Harvey Milk -

Celebrate the life of "the most famous human rights champion the LGBT community has ever had" (Stuart Milk, "Harvey's Enduring Legacy") in this acclaimed documentary. Combining archival footage with original interviews featuring Milk's contemporaries, award-winning producer Rob Epstein captures Milk's spirit and the spirit of time and place -- San Francisco in the 1970s -- that made his rise to prominence possible. The 1984 film is now considered a classic, the first overtly gay film to win the Oscar® for Best Documentary, and a foundational work in this history of the LGBT community on film. Milk was the first openly gay man to win an election for public office in California. He had moved to San Francisco from New York like many young gay men of the era, drawn by the promise of a more tolerant society. There he opened a camera shop in the city's gay district centering on Castro Street. His interest in politics, particularly the rights of LGBT peoples and small business owners, grew, led him to run for the city's Board of Supervisors, a position he finally won in 1977. As a city supervisor, he sponsored major civil rights legislation and campaigned successfully against state legislator John Briggs's ballot initiative to ban gay men, lesbians and their supporters from working in the state's public schools. Less than a year into his term, however, he and San Francisco Mayor George Moscone were assassinated by former supervisor Dan White on November 27, 1978. Milk's death triggered a massive candlelight rally in his memory, followed months later by riots when White was let off with a reduced sentence. Despite his death, however, his memory and his message of hope and inclusiveness have lived on as a demonstration of the powerful political clout of LGBT voters. That was the message Epstein ultimately hoped to send out with his documentary on Milk. As a young gay man, Epstein had gravitated to San Francisco because of its reputation as a gay mecca. Although initially he had no real interest in film, he landed a job at the Mariposa Film Group, where he helped make the seminal gay documentary Word Is Out: Stories of Some of Our Lives (1977). For his next project, he and his Mariposa mentor, Peter Adair, started work on a short film about the Briggs Initiative. That put him in touch with Milk. When the city supervisor was killed three weeks after defeating the Briggs Initiative, Epstein decided to focus his entire film on the man. Milk's death also changed the nature of the film. In the words of critic B. Ruby Rich, the film had started out as a "grassroots documentary chronicle." Epstein initially filmed the campaign against the Briggs Initiative in the thick of the action, following Milk as he debated Briggs and personally campaigned to sway voters against the ballot measure. With Milk's death, it became more an analysis of his political career and its impact on the nation. Epstein contacted many of the man's political and business associates for interviews and enlisted journalist Judith Coburn and novelist Carter Wilson to write a narration, eventually recorded by actor-playwright and four-time Tony winner Harvey Fierstein. He financed the film through a series of house parties where he showed portions of the unfinished film to raise money for its completion. He also used those parties to get insight on what needed to be included to help the film speak to the needs of people, gay and straight, around the nation. Focus Film picked the film up for distribution and premiered it, quite appropriately, at the Castro Theatre. They even contributed to the restoration of that historical theatre in the Castro District. The Times of Harvey Milk was met with strong praise from critics. In The Chicago Sun-Times, Roger Ebert called it "an enormously absorbing film, for the light it sheds on a decade in the life of a great American city and on the lives of Milk and Moscone, who made it a better, and certainly a more interesting, place to live." In addition to the Oscar®, the film won awards from the New York Film Critics, Boston Society of Film Critics, the International Documentary Association, the San Francisco International Lesbian & Gay Film Festival and Sundance. When it aired on television, it was honored with an Emmy and a Peabody Award. In 2012, it was voted a place on the National Film Registry. But the film's legacy reaches beyond mere awards. It launched Epstein's career, leading to a second Oscar®-winning documentary, Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt (1989), the acclaimed documentary The Celluloid Closet (1995), based on Vito Russo's seminal history of gay images in motion pictures, and his first dramatic film, Howl (2010), inspired by Allen Ginsburg's most famous poem and starring James Franco. When California's anti-marriage equality initiative, Proposition 8, passed in 2008, activists fighting for its repeal turned to his first great film, The Times of Harvey Milk, to learn how to organize what would prove to be a successful opposition. All of that is matched by the considerable legacy of the film's subject. The intersection of Market and Castro in San Francisco was renamed Harvey Milk Plaza, and the city's Gay Democratic Club changed its name to the Harvey Milk Memorial Gay Democratic Club. A New York City school for LGBT youth at risk was founded in 1985 and named the Harvey Milk School. In 2009, his nephew, Stuart Milk, accepted a Presidential Medal of Freedom on his uncle's behalf from President Barack Obama. He and Epstein then screened The Times of Harvey Milk in the White House. The same year, Stuart Milk and his uncle's campaign manager, Anne Kronenberg, co-founded the Harvey Milk Foundation to spread Milk's message of hope, acceptance and inclusion. And California officially declared May 22 Harvey Milk Recognition Day. By Frank Miller Producer: Rob Epstein, Richard Schmiechen Director: Rob Epstein Screenplay: Judith Coburn, Carter Wilson Cinematography: Frances Reid Score: Mark Isham Cast: Harvey Fierstein (Narrator), Harvey Milk (Himself, archive footage), Anne Kronenberg, Tory Hartmann, Tom Ammiano, Jim Elliot, Sally M. Gearhart (Themselves)

The Life and Times of Harvey Milk - The Oscar-Winning Best Documentary of 1984 on DVD


The Times of Harvey Milk (1984), directed by Rob Epstein and narrated by Harvey Fierstein, profiles San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk, the first openly gay person elected to political office in the United States. Milk was then and remains still a major figure in American politics, a symbol of social change as well as a hugely successful politician. His death at the hands of Dan White, a fellow member of San Francisco's Board of Supervisors, was a seismic shock through the gay and lesbian community that reverberated across the nation. Dan White killed two people that day, yet the murder of Milk was so emotionally devastating that it all but overshadows the killing of San Francisco Mayor George Moscone.

Harvey Milk became a symbol for both how far the gay and lesbian community had come, and how far it had to go in terms of cultural acceptance in the community at large. The Times of Harvey Milk acknowledges Milk's importance as a trailblazer even as it makes a point of revealing the man -- and the savvy politician -- behind the symbol. The documentary itself is almost as much a landmark: the first openly gay film to win an Academy Award (according to historian B. Ruby Rich) and a portrait that spread not just the story of Harvey Milk and his accomplishments to a wider audience but portrayed gay pride and civic pride as one and the same, and revealed an openly, proudly gay man as, simply, a man, a member of the community, and a human being whose life touched so many others.

A former Wall Street broker, Milk moved to San Francisco in the early 60s, joining an exodus of young gay men who created a community in the Castro district. He was a local business who earned the nickname "The Mayor of Castro Street" for his involvement in civic issues and gay rights. After running for office (and losing) three times, the elections for city supervisor positions was changed from citywide voting to district voting. In 1977, Milk won his district. As Milk himself says, he was elected to represent all San Francisco citizens and he did, tackling quality of life issues that affected all constituents. But he also passionately believed in his work, no more so than when he became the face of the opposition to California Proposition 6, a statewide initiative that would ban gay teachers in the schools. What appeared to be a losing battle turned into an underdog triumph, a sign of the growing political power of the LGBT community and a seismic shift in the public perception of homosexuality. Just as Milk's star was rising, that of Dan White, a former fireman and conservative family man also elected to the Board of Supervisors, was floundering, and after a disastrous public resignation and subsequent change of heart, he shot and killed both Mayor Moscone and Harvey Milk, murdered after a brief 11 months in office. White's trial became notorious for the "Twinkie" defense and the shocking verdict sparked riots.

The Times of Harvey Milk is a straight-ahead documentary shot on low-fidelity 16mm film, filled with news footage of the Milk and interviews with coworkers and supporters. They describe a compassionate man, a driven activist and a smart politician who won over constituents with both his energetic charisma and his organizational effectiveness. One blue collar union man describes how he overcame his prejudice when he saw just how effective Milk organized and executed a boycott of the union-hostile Coors in the gay community. It was them that he realized that Milk fought for the very issues he believed in: schools, parks, quality of life in the city and the rights of working people. No naïve Mr. Smith come to Washington (or San Francisco, in this case), Milk is revealed as a smart, cagey politician who knew how to get things done within the board of supervisors and how to get media attention to his issues and himself. Not merely an effective city official, he was a savvy self-promoter.

The simplicity of the film, which opens on footage of the press conference where Dianne Feinstein, president of San Francisco's Board of Supervisors, announced the deaths of Milk and Moscone, is part of its power. Footage of Milk and his wide, infectious grin helps put a personality to the figure while personal remembrances fills in the portrait. The final act of the film surveys the outpouring of emotion and devotion after his death, the nighttime march and candlelight vigils a recognition of just how greatly Milk had touched not just the gay and lesbian community but the entire city of San Francisco. All while refusing to hide his identity: he was out, loud and proud in an era when such revelations were considered political suicide.

The Times of Harvey Milk is eulogy, elegy and celebration, a remembrance of a man whose example challenged people to face their prejudices and inspired gay young men to embrace their identity, not hide it. His murder at the hands of Dan White, if anything, inspired more men and women to stand up and be counted. As the title suggests, this is not just the portrait of a man but of a culture, a time and a place where everything changed. The biographical drama Milk, directed by Gus Van Sant and starring Sean Penn in an Oscar-winning performance as Harvey Milk in all his goofy, geeky, politically inspired glory, was in large part inspired and guided by this portrait. Penn's incarnation, and the film's astounding recreation of the period (both visually and culturally), comes right out of this astounding film.

Criterion releases its new "Director-approved" edition, digitally mastered from the UCLA Film and Television Archive restoration, on both DVD and Blu-ray. And while a Blu-ray might seem antithetical to the low-budget documentary aesthetic, the high-definition presentation preserves the clarity, the texture and the warmth of the original film and shows the loving attention the filmmakers paid to the interviews and the footage of the Castro district shot for the film. It's a style of filmmaking that no longer exists in the age of lightweight, consumer-priced digital cameras and the new edition preserves it as part of the film's legacy.

Both editions feature commentary by director Rob Epstein, coeditor Deborah Hoffmann and photographer Daniel Nicoletta and the original short documentary Two Films, One Legacy, a 23-minute featurette that contrasts the portraits offered by this documentary and the 2008 feature Milk. Also includes new and archival interviews (including over an hour of videotaped interviews conducted by the directors during their research) and archival footage of Harvey Milk, historical events surrounding the murder and the remembrances in the aftermath. The accompanying booklet features an original essay on the film by film critic and professor B. Ruby Rich, a remembrance of Harvey Milk by his nephew Stuart Milk, and notes on the restoration by Ross Lipman, the senior film restorationist at the UCLA Film and Television Archive.

For more information about The Times of Harvey Milk, visit The Criterion Collection. To order The Times of Harvey Milk, go to TCM Shopping.

by Sean Axmaker

The Life and Times of Harvey Milk - The Oscar-Winning Best Documentary of 1984 on DVD

The Times of Harvey Milk (1984), directed by Rob Epstein and narrated by Harvey Fierstein, profiles San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk, the first openly gay person elected to political office in the United States. Milk was then and remains still a major figure in American politics, a symbol of social change as well as a hugely successful politician. His death at the hands of Dan White, a fellow member of San Francisco's Board of Supervisors, was a seismic shock through the gay and lesbian community that reverberated across the nation. Dan White killed two people that day, yet the murder of Milk was so emotionally devastating that it all but overshadows the killing of San Francisco Mayor George Moscone. Harvey Milk became a symbol for both how far the gay and lesbian community had come, and how far it had to go in terms of cultural acceptance in the community at large. The Times of Harvey Milk acknowledges Milk's importance as a trailblazer even as it makes a point of revealing the man -- and the savvy politician -- behind the symbol. The documentary itself is almost as much a landmark: the first openly gay film to win an Academy Award (according to historian B. Ruby Rich) and a portrait that spread not just the story of Harvey Milk and his accomplishments to a wider audience but portrayed gay pride and civic pride as one and the same, and revealed an openly, proudly gay man as, simply, a man, a member of the community, and a human being whose life touched so many others. A former Wall Street broker, Milk moved to San Francisco in the early 60s, joining an exodus of young gay men who created a community in the Castro district. He was a local business who earned the nickname "The Mayor of Castro Street" for his involvement in civic issues and gay rights. After running for office (and losing) three times, the elections for city supervisor positions was changed from citywide voting to district voting. In 1977, Milk won his district. As Milk himself says, he was elected to represent all San Francisco citizens and he did, tackling quality of life issues that affected all constituents. But he also passionately believed in his work, no more so than when he became the face of the opposition to California Proposition 6, a statewide initiative that would ban gay teachers in the schools. What appeared to be a losing battle turned into an underdog triumph, a sign of the growing political power of the LGBT community and a seismic shift in the public perception of homosexuality. Just as Milk's star was rising, that of Dan White, a former fireman and conservative family man also elected to the Board of Supervisors, was floundering, and after a disastrous public resignation and subsequent change of heart, he shot and killed both Mayor Moscone and Harvey Milk, murdered after a brief 11 months in office. White's trial became notorious for the "Twinkie" defense and the shocking verdict sparked riots. The Times of Harvey Milk is a straight-ahead documentary shot on low-fidelity 16mm film, filled with news footage of the Milk and interviews with coworkers and supporters. They describe a compassionate man, a driven activist and a smart politician who won over constituents with both his energetic charisma and his organizational effectiveness. One blue collar union man describes how he overcame his prejudice when he saw just how effective Milk organized and executed a boycott of the union-hostile Coors in the gay community. It was them that he realized that Milk fought for the very issues he believed in: schools, parks, quality of life in the city and the rights of working people. No naïve Mr. Smith come to Washington (or San Francisco, in this case), Milk is revealed as a smart, cagey politician who knew how to get things done within the board of supervisors and how to get media attention to his issues and himself. Not merely an effective city official, he was a savvy self-promoter. The simplicity of the film, which opens on footage of the press conference where Dianne Feinstein, president of San Francisco's Board of Supervisors, announced the deaths of Milk and Moscone, is part of its power. Footage of Milk and his wide, infectious grin helps put a personality to the figure while personal remembrances fills in the portrait. The final act of the film surveys the outpouring of emotion and devotion after his death, the nighttime march and candlelight vigils a recognition of just how greatly Milk had touched not just the gay and lesbian community but the entire city of San Francisco. All while refusing to hide his identity: he was out, loud and proud in an era when such revelations were considered political suicide. The Times of Harvey Milk is eulogy, elegy and celebration, a remembrance of a man whose example challenged people to face their prejudices and inspired gay young men to embrace their identity, not hide it. His murder at the hands of Dan White, if anything, inspired more men and women to stand up and be counted. As the title suggests, this is not just the portrait of a man but of a culture, a time and a place where everything changed. The biographical drama Milk, directed by Gus Van Sant and starring Sean Penn in an Oscar-winning performance as Harvey Milk in all his goofy, geeky, politically inspired glory, was in large part inspired and guided by this portrait. Penn's incarnation, and the film's astounding recreation of the period (both visually and culturally), comes right out of this astounding film. Criterion releases its new "Director-approved" edition, digitally mastered from the UCLA Film and Television Archive restoration, on both DVD and Blu-ray. And while a Blu-ray might seem antithetical to the low-budget documentary aesthetic, the high-definition presentation preserves the clarity, the texture and the warmth of the original film and shows the loving attention the filmmakers paid to the interviews and the footage of the Castro district shot for the film. It's a style of filmmaking that no longer exists in the age of lightweight, consumer-priced digital cameras and the new edition preserves it as part of the film's legacy. Both editions feature commentary by director Rob Epstein, coeditor Deborah Hoffmann and photographer Daniel Nicoletta and the original short documentary Two Films, One Legacy, a 23-minute featurette that contrasts the portraits offered by this documentary and the 2008 feature Milk. Also includes new and archival interviews (including over an hour of videotaped interviews conducted by the directors during their research) and archival footage of Harvey Milk, historical events surrounding the murder and the remembrances in the aftermath. The accompanying booklet features an original essay on the film by film critic and professor B. Ruby Rich, a remembrance of Harvey Milk by his nephew Stuart Milk, and notes on the restoration by Ross Lipman, the senior film restorationist at the UCLA Film and Television Archive. For more information about The Times of Harvey Milk, visit The Criterion Collection. To order The Times of Harvey Milk, go to TCM Shopping. by Sean Axmaker

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 1, 1984

Re-released in United States September 15, 2000

Released in United States 1984

Released in United States March 1985

Released in United States 1986

Released in United States 1994

Released in United States 2000

Shown at 1984 New York Film Festival.

Shown at 1986 American Film and Video Festival, New York.

The 2000 re-release of "The Time of Harvey Milk" has been restored by the UCLA Film and Television Archive.

Released in United States November 1984 (Los Angeles)

Released in United States Fall November 1, 1984

Re-released in United States September 15, 2000 (Film Forum/ 2000 restoration; New York City)

Released in United States 1984 (Shown at 1984 New York Film Festival.)

Released in United States March 1985 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition (Oscar Nominated Shorts and Documentaries) March 14-31, 1985.)

Released in United States 1986 (Shown at 1986 American Film and Video Festival, New York.)

Released in United States 1994 (Shown in New York City (MOMA) as part of program "Gays and Film: Get Reel" June 17 - July 12, 1994.)

Released in United States 2000 (Shown at Sundance Film Festival (Sundance Collection/ 2000 restoration) in Park City, Utah Janaury 18-28, 2001.)

Released in United States November 1984