Temptress Moon


1h 55m 1996

Brief Synopsis

The story begins in 1911 with a boy, Zhongliang, brought to the country estate of the wealthy Pang family, a place of opium-addled decadence hidden behind a traditional facade. His older sister, who has married into the clan, promises him the life of a student. But when he arrives, he is forced to b

Film Details

Also Known As
Feng Yue
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1996
Production Company
Cine Rent Co Ltd; Nikkatsu Studio
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX; Argus Entertainment; Bim Distribuzione; CinTart; Filmcoopi Zurich Ag; Filmladen Gmbh; MIRAMAX; Miramax Home Entertainment; Miramax International; Pandora Film Produktion; Triangelfilm
Location
Suzhou, China; Shanghai, China

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m

Synopsis

The story begins in 1911 with a boy, Zhongliang, brought to the country estate of the wealthy Pang family, a place of opium-addled decadence hidden behind a traditional facade. His older sister, who has married into the clan, promises him the life of a student. But when he arrives, he is forced to become their servant. As a child, he hates their cruelty, he envies their wealth, and he burns with a passion for everything he can't have. Zhongliang's departure several years later is shrouded in mystery. He heads for Beijing only to be sidetracked to Shanghai, a glittering metropolis of elegant corruption caught up in the jazz-spiked rush of the modern age. There, he becomes the favorite son of a powerful crime family with a specialty in seducing and blackmailing wealthy women. Then, Zhongliang is given a new assignment: to seduce a young woman, Pang Ruyi, a woman he knows all too well--the heir to the Pang family fortune.

Film Details

Also Known As
Feng Yue
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1996
Production Company
Cine Rent Co Ltd; Nikkatsu Studio
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX; Argus Entertainment; Bim Distribuzione; CinTart; Filmcoopi Zurich Ag; Filmladen Gmbh; MIRAMAX; Miramax Home Entertainment; Miramax International; Pandora Film Produktion; Triangelfilm
Location
Suzhou, China; Shanghai, China

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m

Articles

Leslie Cheung, 1956-2003


Leslie Cheung, the Chinese singer and actor who won international acclaim for his role as a homosexual opera singer who commits suicide in the Oscar-nominated Farewell My Concubine (1993), died after leaping from a hotel in Hong Kong on April 1. He was 46.

Cheung was born on September 12, 1956 in Hong Kong, the youngest of ten children. He was fascinated by cinema from an early age (his father was the tailor to screen legend William Holden) and following graduation from secondary school, he studied drama at Leeds University in Great Britain. Upon his return to Hong Kong, he entered in the 1976 ATV Asian Music Contest, and took second prize. Cheung used this opportunity to cultivate his first taste of stardom as one of Asia's most popular singers and a celebrity to Chinese-speaking people around the world.

His high profile in pop music led to some film work, which at first was light, teen fare. The turning point came when John Woo cast him as the rookie cop opposite Chow Yun-fat in the wildly popular Hong Kong action flick A Better Tomorrow (1986). The film's success allowed Cheung to expand his film range and his next role was as an opium-smoking playboy in Stanley Kwan's Rouge (1987), a romantic ghost story that fluctuated between the Hong Kong of the '30s and the '80s. That film helped Cheung present his versatility as a romantic leading man as well as his skill at action sequences.

The '90s saw Cheung steadily improve as an actor with some varied roles: a cunning jewel thief in John Woo's slick suspense drama, Once a Thief (1990); a suave villain in Wong Kar-Wai's Days of Being Wild (1991); and his extraordinary star turn as the gay, female-impersonating Chinese opera singer Cheng Dieyi in Chen Kaige's brilliant historical drama Farewell My Concubine (1993). His portrayal of Cheng, who experiences bitterness and regret throughout his life, and is driven to suicide by a failed love affair, was one of great sensitivity, and an incandescent charisma that few knew he possessed. The film won the prestigious Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival and rightly earned Cheung international acclaim.

Cheung continued to tackle interesting parts after the success of Concubine: a depraved opium addict in another stylish film by Chen Kaige, Temptress Moon (1996); a gutsy performance as the vituperative Ho Po-wing, one of a pair of gay Chinese lovers on holiday in Buenos Aires in Wong Kar-Wai's sexually explicit Happy Together (1997); and most recently, a man possessed by a dead girlfriend who tries to lure him into jumping to his death (another eerie parallel to his own suicide) in Chi-Leung Law's horror film Inner Senses (2002), which earned him a best actor at this last Sunday's Hong Kong Film Awards. He is survived by numerous family members.

by Michael T. Toole
Leslie Cheung, 1956-2003

Leslie Cheung, 1956-2003

Leslie Cheung, the Chinese singer and actor who won international acclaim for his role as a homosexual opera singer who commits suicide in the Oscar-nominated Farewell My Concubine (1993), died after leaping from a hotel in Hong Kong on April 1. He was 46. Cheung was born on September 12, 1956 in Hong Kong, the youngest of ten children. He was fascinated by cinema from an early age (his father was the tailor to screen legend William Holden) and following graduation from secondary school, he studied drama at Leeds University in Great Britain. Upon his return to Hong Kong, he entered in the 1976 ATV Asian Music Contest, and took second prize. Cheung used this opportunity to cultivate his first taste of stardom as one of Asia's most popular singers and a celebrity to Chinese-speaking people around the world. His high profile in pop music led to some film work, which at first was light, teen fare. The turning point came when John Woo cast him as the rookie cop opposite Chow Yun-fat in the wildly popular Hong Kong action flick A Better Tomorrow (1986). The film's success allowed Cheung to expand his film range and his next role was as an opium-smoking playboy in Stanley Kwan's Rouge (1987), a romantic ghost story that fluctuated between the Hong Kong of the '30s and the '80s. That film helped Cheung present his versatility as a romantic leading man as well as his skill at action sequences. The '90s saw Cheung steadily improve as an actor with some varied roles: a cunning jewel thief in John Woo's slick suspense drama, Once a Thief (1990); a suave villain in Wong Kar-Wai's Days of Being Wild (1991); and his extraordinary star turn as the gay, female-impersonating Chinese opera singer Cheng Dieyi in Chen Kaige's brilliant historical drama Farewell My Concubine (1993). His portrayal of Cheng, who experiences bitterness and regret throughout his life, and is driven to suicide by a failed love affair, was one of great sensitivity, and an incandescent charisma that few knew he possessed. The film won the prestigious Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival and rightly earned Cheung international acclaim. Cheung continued to tackle interesting parts after the success of Concubine: a depraved opium addict in another stylish film by Chen Kaige, Temptress Moon (1996); a gutsy performance as the vituperative Ho Po-wing, one of a pair of gay Chinese lovers on holiday in Buenos Aires in Wong Kar-Wai's sexually explicit Happy Together (1997); and most recently, a man possessed by a dead girlfriend who tries to lure him into jumping to his death (another eerie parallel to his own suicide) in Chi-Leung Law's horror film Inner Senses (2002), which earned him a best actor at this last Sunday's Hong Kong Film Awards. He is survived by numerous family members. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Expanded Release in United States June 27, 1997

Limited Release in United States June 20, 1997

Released in United States 1996

Released in United States 1997

Released in United States January 1997

Released in United States March 1997

Released in United States May 1996

Released in United States on Video January 13, 1998

Released in United States Summer June 13, 1997

Shown at Cannes Film Festival (in competition) May 9-20, 1996.

Shown at New York Film Festival September 27 - October 13, 1996.

Shown at Portland Interntional Film Festivl February 13 - March 2, 1997.

Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival March 6-19, 1997.

Shown at Sundance Film Festival (World Cinema) in Park City, Utah January 16-26, 1997.

Project was put on hold in November of 1994 and resumed production in April 1995 after director Chen Kaige twice replaced the lead actress.

Began shooting late October 1994.

Released in United States 1996 (Shown at New York Film Festival September 27 - October 13, 1996.)

Released in United States 1997 (Shown at Portland Interntional Film Festivl February 13 - March 2, 1997.)

Released in United States January 1997 (Shown at Sundance Film Festival (World Cinema) in Park City, Utah January 16-26, 1997.)

Released in United States on Video January 13, 1998

Released in United States March 1997 (Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival March 6-19, 1997.)

Released in United States May 1996 (Shown at Cannes Film Festival (in competition) May 9-20, 1996.)

Released in United States Summer June 13, 1997

Limited Release in United States June 20, 1997

Expanded Release in United States June 27, 1997