Stiff Upper Lips


1h 26m 1997

Brief Synopsis

A period comedy, set in the heart of the British countryside 1908, about the sexual awakenings of a group of young Edwardians and their withering Aunt. Romance is afoot. Aunt Agnes, a guardian, is desperate to marry off her neice, emily. Anyone will do... as long as he's from a respectable family, i

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
Cowboy Pictures
Location
India; Isle of Man; Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m

Synopsis

A period comedy, set in the heart of the British countryside 1908, about the sexual awakenings of a group of young Edwardians and their withering Aunt. Romance is afoot. Aunt Agnes, a guardian, is desperate to marry off her neice, emily. Anyone will do... as long as he's from a respectable family, is wealthy, has the proper schooling AND the right class background. In hopes of producing a suitable match, Emily's brother Edward brings his Latin-quoting best friend Cedric home for a visit. Everything is perfect--except Emily hates Cedric and Cedric may be more interested in Edward than in his sister. Sensing the young couple's apathy toward each other, Aunt Agnes proposes a romantic trip abroad. Accompanied by hunky luggage bearer George, the group sets off to sample foreign pleasures...

Crew

Dolly Ahluwalia

Costume Designer

Tim Alban

Dubbing Mixer

Allan Amin

Stunt Coordinator

Simon Archer

Director Of Photography

Thomas Arne

Music

Paul Bateman

Music Conductor

Bobby Bedi

Coproducer

Mona Bernal

Production Coordinator

Adam Bohling

Production Manager

Jeremy Bolt

Producer

Lucio Bompani

Production Supervisor

Paula Boram

Foley Artist

Johannes Brahms

Music

Aaron Cahill

Music Arranger

Paul Cain

Wrangler

Francesco Chianese

Art Director

Manolita Cipparrone

Assistant Director

Andrew Cohen

Co-Executive Producer

Stephanie Collie

Costume Designer

Lorraine Cooksley

Wardrobe Supervisor

Amanda Coulier

Production Coordinator

Anjali Daphtary

Production Coordinator

Paul Davies

Dialogue Editor

Stephen Deitch

Other

Tigmanshu Dhulia

Assistant Director

Louis Elman

Casting

Lucy Fawcett

Foley Artist

Jason Fisher-jones

Titles

Phil Gates

Location Manager

Stefan Gates

Assistant Director

Miriam Gauci

Other

Mike Grant

Production Designer

Michael Halisz

Music Conductor

Danny Hambrook

Sound

George Frederick Handel

Music

Simon Hardy

Line Producer

Roger Hodgson

Music

Peter Hollywood

Editor

Eric Houlgrave

Other

David A Hughes

Music

David A Hughes

Music Producer

David A Hughes

Music Arranger

Michael Hunter

Other

Sally Jagger

Animal Wrangler

Moving Jim

Art Director

Alok Kapur

Assistant Director

Teresa Kelly

Makeup Artist

Helen Lennox

Hairdresser

Gianluce Leurini

Production Manager

Ewa J Lind

Other

Hans-martin Linde

Music Conductor

Richard Lingrad

Assistant Director

Gustav Mahler

Music

Sanjay Malik

Unit Manager

Stephen Margolis

Co-Executive Producer

Pietro Mascagni

Music

Malcolm Melling

Music Arranger

Elise Menghini-hill

Production Manager

P K Murali Menon

Location Manager

Simon Minett

Camera

John Murphy

Music Producer

John Murphy

Music Arranger

John Murphy

Music

Bernard O'reilly

Foley Editor

Mark Phythian

Other

Enrique Posner

Associate Producer

Franck Pourcel

Music Arranger

Georges Pretre

Music Conductor

Giacomo Puccini

Music

Sergei Rachmaninov

Music

Alexander Rahbari

Music Conductor

Keith Richardson

Coproducer

Natasha Ross

Production Supervisor

Gioacchino Antonio Rossini

Music

Gabriele Santini

Music Conductor

Jukka-pekka Saraste

Music Conductor

Nigel Savage

Executive Producer

Curtis Schwartz

Music Arranger

Simon Scotland

Line Producer

Aradhana Seth

Art Director

Marinella Setti

Script Supervisor

Lisa Shanley

Costumes

Jenny Sharpe

Makeup

Paul Simpkin

Screenplay

Paul Simpkin

Other

Sunita Singh

Costumes

Gary Sinyor

Screenplay

Gary Sinyor

Producer

Peter D Smith

Adr

Richard Sparks

Other

Emanuele Spatafora

Production Supervisor

Emma Style

Casting Director

Natasha Tahta

Assistant Director

Babs Thomas

Co-Executive Producer

Sarah Thomas

Associate Editor

Roberto Todeschi

Location Manager

Alf Tramontin

Steadicam Operator

Gary Turnbull

Camera

Rod Woodruff

Stunt Coordinator

Marcus Wookey

Art Director

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
Cowboy Pictures
Location
India; Isle of Man; Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m

Articles

Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)


Sir Peter Ustinov, the witty, multi-talented actor, director and writer whose 60-year career in entertainment included two Best Supporting Actor Oscars® for his memorable character turns in the films Spartacus and Topkapi, died of heart failure on March 28 at a clinic in Genolier, Switzerland. He was 82.

He was born Peter Alexander Ustinov on April 16, 1921 in London, England. His father was a press attache at the German embassy until 1935 - when disgusted by the Nazi regime - he took out British nationality. He attended Westminster School, an exclusive private school in central London until he was 16. He then enrolled for acting classes at the London Theater Studio, and by 1939, he made his London stage debut.

His jovial nature and strong gift for dialects made him a natural player for films, and it wasn't long after finding theatre work that Ustinov moved into motion pictures: a Dutch priest in Michael Powell's One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1941); an elderly Czech professor in Let the People Sing (1942); and a star pupil of a Nazi spy school in The Goose Steps Out (1942).

He served in the British Army for four years (1942-46), where he found his talents well utilized by the military, allowing him to join the director Sir Carol Reed on some propaganda films. He eventually earned his first screenwriting credit for The Way Ahead (1944). One of Sir Carol Reed's best films, The Way Ahead was a thrilling drama which starred David Niven as a civilian heading up a group of locals to resist an oncoming Nazi unit. It was enough of a hit to earn Ustinov his first film directorial assignment, School for Secrets (1946), a well paced drama about the discovery of radar starring Sir Ralph Richardson and Sir Richard Attenborough.

After the war, Ustinov took on another writer-director project Vice Versa (1948), a whimsical fantasy-comedy starring Roger Livesey and Anthony Newley as a father and son who magically switch personalities. Although not a huge hit of its day, the sheer buoyancy of the surreal premise has earned the film a large cult following.

Ustinov made his Hollywood debut, and garnered his first Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor, as an indolent Nero in the Roman epic, Quo Vadis? (1951). After achieving some international popularity with that role, Ustinov gave some top-notch performances in quality films: the snappish Prinny in the Stewart Granger vehicle Beau Brummel (1954); holding his own against Humphrey Bogart as an escaped convict in We're No Angels (1954); the ring master who presides over the life of the lead character in Max Ophuls's resplendent Lola Montez (1955); and a garrulous settler coping with the Australian outback in The Sundowners (1960).

The '60s would be Ustinov's most fruitful decade. He started off gabbing his first Oscar® as the cunning slave dealer in Spartacus (1960); made a smooth screen adaptation by directing his smash play, Romanoff and Juliet (1961), earned critical acclaim for his co-adaptation, direction, production and performance in Herman Melville's nautical classic Billy Budd (1962); and earned a second Oscar® as the fumbling jewel thief in the crime comedy Topkapi (1964).

He scored another Oscar® nomination in the Best Original Screenplay category for his airy, clever crime romp Hot Millions (1968), in which he played a con artist who uses a computer to bilk a company out of millions of dollars; but after that, Ustinov began taking a string of offbeat character parts: the lead in one of Disney's better kiddie flicks Blackbeard's Ghost (1968); a Mexican General who wants to reclaim Texas for Mexico in Viva Max! (1969); an old man who survives the ravaged planet of the future in Logan's Run (1976); and an unfortunate turn as a Chinese stereotype in Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981). Still, he did achieve renewed popularity when he took on the role of Hercule Poirot in the star laced, Agatha Christie extravaganza Death on the Nile (1978). He was such a hit, that he would adroitly play the Belgian detective in two more theatrical movies: Evil Under the Sun (1982) and Appointment With Death (1988); as well as three television movies: Thirteen at Dinner (1985), Murder in Three Acts, Dead Man's Folly (both 1986).

Beyond his work in films, Ustinov was justifiably praised for his humanitarian work - most notably as the unpaid, goodwill ambassador for United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Since 1968, he had traveled to all corners of the globe: China, Russia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Kenya, Egypt, Thailand and numerous other countries to promote and host many benefit concerts for the agency.

Ustinov, who in 1990 earned a knighthood for his artistic and humanitarian contributions, is survived by his wife of 32 years, Hélène du Lau d'Allemans; three daughters, Tamara, Pavla, Andrea; and a son, Igor.

by Michael T. Toole
Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)

Sir Peter Ustinov (1921-2004)

Sir Peter Ustinov, the witty, multi-talented actor, director and writer whose 60-year career in entertainment included two Best Supporting Actor Oscars® for his memorable character turns in the films Spartacus and Topkapi, died of heart failure on March 28 at a clinic in Genolier, Switzerland. He was 82. He was born Peter Alexander Ustinov on April 16, 1921 in London, England. His father was a press attache at the German embassy until 1935 - when disgusted by the Nazi regime - he took out British nationality. He attended Westminster School, an exclusive private school in central London until he was 16. He then enrolled for acting classes at the London Theater Studio, and by 1939, he made his London stage debut. His jovial nature and strong gift for dialects made him a natural player for films, and it wasn't long after finding theatre work that Ustinov moved into motion pictures: a Dutch priest in Michael Powell's One of Our Aircraft is Missing (1941); an elderly Czech professor in Let the People Sing (1942); and a star pupil of a Nazi spy school in The Goose Steps Out (1942). He served in the British Army for four years (1942-46), where he found his talents well utilized by the military, allowing him to join the director Sir Carol Reed on some propaganda films. He eventually earned his first screenwriting credit for The Way Ahead (1944). One of Sir Carol Reed's best films, The Way Ahead was a thrilling drama which starred David Niven as a civilian heading up a group of locals to resist an oncoming Nazi unit. It was enough of a hit to earn Ustinov his first film directorial assignment, School for Secrets (1946), a well paced drama about the discovery of radar starring Sir Ralph Richardson and Sir Richard Attenborough. After the war, Ustinov took on another writer-director project Vice Versa (1948), a whimsical fantasy-comedy starring Roger Livesey and Anthony Newley as a father and son who magically switch personalities. Although not a huge hit of its day, the sheer buoyancy of the surreal premise has earned the film a large cult following. Ustinov made his Hollywood debut, and garnered his first Oscar® nomination for Best Supporting Actor, as an indolent Nero in the Roman epic, Quo Vadis? (1951). After achieving some international popularity with that role, Ustinov gave some top-notch performances in quality films: the snappish Prinny in the Stewart Granger vehicle Beau Brummel (1954); holding his own against Humphrey Bogart as an escaped convict in We're No Angels (1954); the ring master who presides over the life of the lead character in Max Ophuls's resplendent Lola Montez (1955); and a garrulous settler coping with the Australian outback in The Sundowners (1960). The '60s would be Ustinov's most fruitful decade. He started off gabbing his first Oscar® as the cunning slave dealer in Spartacus (1960); made a smooth screen adaptation by directing his smash play, Romanoff and Juliet (1961), earned critical acclaim for his co-adaptation, direction, production and performance in Herman Melville's nautical classic Billy Budd (1962); and earned a second Oscar® as the fumbling jewel thief in the crime comedy Topkapi (1964). He scored another Oscar® nomination in the Best Original Screenplay category for his airy, clever crime romp Hot Millions (1968), in which he played a con artist who uses a computer to bilk a company out of millions of dollars; but after that, Ustinov began taking a string of offbeat character parts: the lead in one of Disney's better kiddie flicks Blackbeard's Ghost (1968); a Mexican General who wants to reclaim Texas for Mexico in Viva Max! (1969); an old man who survives the ravaged planet of the future in Logan's Run (1976); and an unfortunate turn as a Chinese stereotype in Charlie Chan and the Curse of the Dragon Queen (1981). Still, he did achieve renewed popularity when he took on the role of Hercule Poirot in the star laced, Agatha Christie extravaganza Death on the Nile (1978). He was such a hit, that he would adroitly play the Belgian detective in two more theatrical movies: Evil Under the Sun (1982) and Appointment With Death (1988); as well as three television movies: Thirteen at Dinner (1985), Murder in Three Acts, Dead Man's Folly (both 1986). Beyond his work in films, Ustinov was justifiably praised for his humanitarian work - most notably as the unpaid, goodwill ambassador for United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Since 1968, he had traveled to all corners of the globe: China, Russia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Kenya, Egypt, Thailand and numerous other countries to promote and host many benefit concerts for the agency. Ustinov, who in 1990 earned a knighthood for his artistic and humanitarian contributions, is survived by his wife of 32 years, Hélène du Lau d'Allemans; three daughters, Tamara, Pavla, Andrea; and a son, Igor. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1997

Released in United States March 1998

Released in United States November 1997

Released in United States on Video September 12, 2000

Released in United States Summer August 27, 1999

Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica, California February 27 - March 6, 1997.

Shown at Dublin Film Festival March 3-12, 1998.

Shown at London Film Festival (British Cinema) November 6-23, 1997.

Began shooting March 3, 1996.

Completed shooting May 16, 1996.

Film is a thinly veiled parody of several different Merchant/Ivory and "True Brit" films.

Filmpact is a partnership between Impact Pictures (United Kingdom) and Filmania (Spain).

Released in United States 1997 (Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica, California February 27 - March 6, 1997.)

Released in United States March 1998 (Shown at Dublin Film Festival March 3-12, 1998.)

Released in United States Summer August 27, 1999

Released in United States on Video September 12, 2000

Released in United States November 1997 (Shown at London Film Festival (British Cinema) November 6-23, 1997.)