Shiloh 2: Shiloh Season


1h 36m 1999

Brief Synopsis

Twelve-year-old Marty Preston adopts Shiloh, a beagle who was mistreated by his previous owner, the drunken Judd Travers. But when Judd is injured after driving while drunk, Marty wants to help him to improve his life. Through a series of events, he discovers just how deep one grown man's hurt can g

Film Details

Also Known As
Nieuwe Avonturen van Shailo
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Production Company
Kent Hamilton
Distribution Company
Legacy Releasing

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Synopsis

Twelve-year-old Marty Preston adopts Shiloh, a beagle who was mistreated by his previous owner, the drunken Judd Travers. But when Judd is injured after driving while drunk, Marty wants to help him to improve his life. Through a series of events, he discovers just how deep one grown man's hurt can go and how long it takes to cure.

Crew

Preston Adams

Lighting

Frederique Barrera

Assistant Production Coordinator

Kim Bartlein

Adr Supervisor

Ridge Blackwell

Accountant

Chris Blackwood

Stunts

J Adam W Bogle Jr.

Driver

Carl Borack

Producer

Aubrey Boytos

Grip

Katherine Brock

Music Coordinator

Blake Busby

Main Title Design

Joseph Butler

Editor

Doug Cameron

Stand-In

Luca A Carena

Other

Alexander Carroll

Post-Production Supervisor

Amanda Carroll

Makeup

Michael P Catanzarite

Best Boy

Rick Chadock

Music Producer

Rick Chadock

Music

Dave Channel

Stand-In

Nicole Christopher

Other

Mathew Coleman

Lighting Technician

Jalena Cotner

Stand-In

R Vern Crofoot

Props

Paul Cuffee

Lighting Technician

Derrick Cunningham

Grip

Jane Dancey

Wardrobe Supervisor

Jason Dauman

Music Coordinator

Chris Dechert

Assistant Property Master

Christian Degeneffe

Swing Gang

Craig Delahousaye

Negative Cutter

Stehen Delgago

Grip

David Depalo

Music Conductor

David Dickerson

Production Assistant

Donna L Dragich

Art Department Coordinator

Ilko J. Drozdoski

Office Assistant

Loretta M Elliott

Accounting Assistant

Randy Farrar

Music

Cezanne Farris-gilbert

Office Assistant

Richard Favazzo

Other

Paul Feddersen

Driver

Joe Fuchs

Carpenter

Michele Gampel

Makeup Assistant

David Edward Garber

Driver

Emily Gaydos

Sound Editing

Jason Gerber

Production Assistant

Jerry Gilbert

Production Coordinator

Bryan Godwin

Photography

Arleen Goldenberg

Negative Cutting

Joel Goldsmith

Music Producer

Joel Goldsmith

Music

Geoffrey Gormley

Assistant Editor

Dean Gunderson

Assistant Camera Operator

Sarah Hale

Office Assistant

Kent Hamilton

Production Insurance

Tina Han

Set Production Assistant

Lisa Hannan

Editor

Ted Hayash

Photography

Rex Hill

Security

Lynn Hope

Other

Inger Howard

Set Decorator

Diane Hubner

Other

Hiro Kakuhari

Lighting Technician

Tracy Kelly

Animal Trainer

Whitney Kroenke

Casting Associate

Curt Larson

Transportation Captain

Michelle Latham

Location Manager

Greg Lauden

Foley Artist

Lee Lazarow

Props

Jodi Leininger

Assistant Location Manager

Ken Leoganda

Other

Bryan Leslie

Carpenter

Zane Levitt

Producer

John W. Jr. Lewis

Electrician

Scott Leyse

Assistant Camera Operator

Michael Locke

Transportation Coordinator

Richard Locke

Driver

Wren Maloney

Photography

Cyrus Ives Marshall

Production Assistant

Arona Martin

Set Costumer

Jackie Martin

Other

Greg Mauer

Foley Recordist

Jim Mccarthy

Production Accountant

Scott Mcgregor

Grip

Cole Mckay

Stunts

Sooner Mckay

Assistant

Lisa Mcneil

Script Supervisor

Gary Miller

Camera

Benjamin N Minot

Camera Assistant

Ronald A Modro

Production Coordinator

Donald D Monohan

Sound Mixer

Brent Morris

Unit Production Manager

Anthony A Mparmperis

Office Assistant

Esther Murphy

Animal Trainer

Rowena Murphy

Adr

Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Source Material (From Novel)

Alex Newman

Animal Wrangler

David Ortiz

Driver

Paul N. J. Ottosson

Sound Effects

Gary Paul

Stunt Coordinator

Andy Potvin

Consultant

Sue Pusateri

Foley Artist

Jennifer Rae Smith

Other

Aurelia M Ranches

Other

Cynthia Ranches

Other

Paul Ratajczak

Rerecording

Paul Ratajczak

Post-Production Supervisor

Rikke Rosbaeck

Costume Designer

Dale Rosenbloom

Producer

Dale Rosenbloom

Screenplay

Richard E Rosenthal

Other

Solene Roy

Office Assistant

Manuel Ruiz

Driver

Leesa-ree Sandoval

On-Set Dresser

Julie Schultz

Animal Trainer

Tony Schwartz

Assistant Director

Tom Seid

Editor

Laura Sherman

Location Scout

Laura Shiff

Casting

Curtis Smith

Key Grip

Shana Smith

Assistant

Troy Smith

Director Of Photography

Andre Soto

Grip

Donald F Spinney

Animal Trainer

Diana Stadlen

Casting Associate

Brent Stanton

Assistant Director

Rick Sulier

Accounting Assistant

Dionne Thompson-winters

Office Assistant

Joseph Tintfass

Production Designer

Reno Tondelli

Electrician

Steve Tushar

Sound Effects Editor

Jan Van Houdt

Other

Lisa Vasconcellos

Associate Producer

Marc Verbyos

Assistant Editor

Nick Vidar

Editing

Tom Vozza

Photography

Jonathan Wales

Rerecording

Michael Warren

Grip

Jennifer Wilkinson

Assistant Director

Seth Willenson

Executive Producer

Donald D Williams

Driver

Patsy Williams

Craft Service

Chuck Winston

Color Timer

James Elya Winters

Production Assistant

Lance Wiseman

Sound Mixer

Nancy Withrow

Animal Trainer

Jackson Wolfe

Post-Production Supervisor

Larry Wright

Camera Operator

Mark Yellen

Producer

Film Details

Also Known As
Nieuwe Avonturen van Shailo
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Production Company
Kent Hamilton
Distribution Company
Legacy Releasing

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger


ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Tcm Remembers - Rod Steiger

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Expanded Release in United States July 2, 1999

Released in United States April 1999

Released in United States Summer June 25, 1999

Shown at Palm Beach International Film Festival April 9-18, 1999.

Shown at WorldFest/Houston Film Festival April 1999.

Released in United States April 1999 (Shown at Palm Beach International Film Festival April 9-18, 1999.)

Released in United States April 1999 (Shown at WorldFest/Houston Film Festival April 1999.)

Released in United States Summer June 25, 1999

Expanded Release in United States July 2, 1999