Princess Mononoke


2h 15m 1999
Princess Mononoke

Brief Synopsis

A woman raised by wolves leads forest animals in a fight to save their homes.

Film Details

Also Known As
La princesa Mononoke, Mononoke Hime, Princesse Mononoke, princesa Mononoke
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Fantasy
Release Date
1999
Production Company
Studio Ghibli
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m
Color
Color
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85:1

Synopsis

A woman raised by wolves leads forest animals in a fight to save their homes.

Crew

Akihiko Adachi

Inbetweener

Akiko Aihara

Production

Sigeko Akanuma

Other

Stephen M Alpert

Other

Stephen M Alpert

Interpreter

Stephen M Alpert

Song

Masahi Ando

Animator

Kaori Anmi

Other

Naomi Anzai

Production

Seiko Anzuma

Inbetweener

Noritoshi Aoyagi

Other

Sadayuki Arai

Other

Shigeto Arai

Other

Shokichi Arai

Other

Koji Aritomi

Assistant

Yoriko Asai

Other

Tsutomu Asakura

Sound

Naomi Atsuta

Other

Tsutomu Awada

Animator

Patti Awakuni

Special Thanks To

David B Baron

Production Assistant

Laurie Bean

Production Assistant

Benu Bhargara

Apprentice

Lisa Carlon

Production Assistant

Jennifer Cihi

Song

Reiko Daigo

Production

Gerald Donlan

Foley Editor

Denise Doyle

Special Thanks To

Dan Edelstein

Foley Editor

David Encinas

Inbetweener

Masaaki Endo

Animator

Roy Evans

Other

Jack Fletcher

Other

Jack Fletcher

Adr

Jack Fletcher

Voice Casting

Kiyomi Fujihashi

Animator

Kaori Fujii

Inbetweener

Masayo Fujikura

Animator

Maya Fujimori

Inbetweener

Sue Fujimoto

Other

Eiko Fujitsu

Other

Nozomi Fukada

Other

Masahiro Fukuhara

Rerecording Assistant

Yoshikazu Fukutome

Special Effects

Ryoichi Fukuyama

Other

Sachiko Funasaki

Other

Kenji Furukawa

Music

Hiromi Furuya

Inbetweener

Sumiko Furuya

Animator

Makiko Futaki

Animator

Neil Gaiman

Song

Neil Gaiman

Screenplay

Mimi Glaser

Special Thanks To

Keiko Goto

Other

Keiji Hamada

Other

Kiroko Hanamoto

Production

Meiko Hara

Other

Chiharu Haraguchi

Inbetweener

Chie Harai

Other

Tomoji Hashizume

Special Effects

Kimiko Hatano

Other

Keiichiro Hattori

Visual Effects

Yoshie Hayashi

Inbetweener

Hiroaki Hirabayashi

Other

Kazuhiro Hirabayshi

Other

Sayaka Hirahara

Other

Kazuko Hirai

Animator

Nobutaka Hirooka

Other

Joe Hisaishi

Music

Mari Hitokurai

Animator

Tomoki Horaguchi

Other

Akio Ichmura

Other

Yoshiko Igarashi

Animator

Natsuko Iimori

Animator

Kazuhiko Ikai

Sound Effects

Tatsuya Ikeba

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Kenji Imura

Production Assistant

Ryoko Ina

Other

Kazumi Inaki

Music

Takeshi Inamura

Animator

Masafumi Inoue

Graphics

Shuji Inoue

Sound Mixer

Mihoko Irie

Animator

Michiyo Iseda

Other

Masayo Iseki

Color

Kaori Ishidawa

Other

Megumi Ishido

Production

Shimuka Ishiguro

Other

Hiroya Ishihara

Music

Hiroaki Ishii

Visual Effects

Leslie Ishii

Song

Eriko Ishikawa

Animator

Noriko Ishimitsu

Other

Takahisa Ishino

Sound Effects

Masakatsu Ishizone

Assistant

Keiichi Itagaki

Production

Shin Itagaki

Animator

Hiroyuki Ito

Assistant

Junko Ito

Production

Kazuaki Ito

Other

Michihiro Ito

Sound Effects

Toshiko Iwakiri

Other

Emiko Iwayanagi

Inbetweener

Daisuke Kadoya

Other

Yukiko Kakita

Production

Tomoko Kamiya

Other

Yoshinori Kanada

Animator

Junko Kanauchi

Production

Mitsuharu Kanei

Other

Naomi Kasugai

Other

Mitsunori Kataama

Graphics

Yuriko Katayama

Other

Mariko Kato

Other

Takao Kato

Sound Effects

Mitsuyoshi Katsurada

Other

Shozo Katsuta

Other

Jay Kaufman

Special Thanks To

Toshiyuki Kawabata

Production Manager

Manabu Kawada

Inbetweener

Megumi Kawaga

Animator

Toshio Kawaguchi

Animator

Hana Kikuchi

Inbetweener

Yumiko Kimura

Other

Skigeharu Kitamura

Other

Yumiko Kitayima

Inbetweener

Kazuo Kobayashi

Other

Sachiko Kobayashi

Inbetweener

Shigeru Kobayashi

Other

Atsushi Kodama

Other

Masamune Kogei

Sound Effects

Tamaki Kojo

Camera Operator

Shogo Komagata

Other

Rie Kondo

Inbetweener

Yoshifumi Kondo

Animator

Kenichi Konishi

Animator

Kitaro Kosaka

Animator

Michiyo Koyanagi

Other

Yuriko Kudo

Other

Hiroshi Kumagai

Music Conductor

Misuku Kurata

Inbetweener

Satoshi Kuroda

Art Director

Kazuko Kurosawa

Animator

Ikuo Kuwana

Animator

Sasha Lazard

Song Performer

Eric Anthony Lewis

Production Assistant

Geof Liptman

Sound

Ian Macdougall

Interpreter

Kinuyo Maehara

Other

Kiyoko Makita

Inbetweener

Kaoru Mano

Titles

Reiko Mano

Inbetweener

Scott Martin

Executive Producer

Megumi Matsuo

Production

Masaru Matsuse

Animator

Atsuko Matsushita

Inbetweener

Kei Mayama

Audio

Mary E Mcglynn

Song

Michio Mihara

Animator

Hiroko Minowa

Animator

Junko Miyakawa

Animator

Chiemi Miyamoto

Other

Hayao Miyazaki

From Story

Hayao Miyazaki

Editor

Hayao Miyazaki

Screenplay

Hayao Miyazaki

Animator

Hayao Miyazaki

Song

Kyoko Mizuta

Production Assistant

Yuichiro Mochizuki

Other

Yoshiyuki Momose

Graphics

Naomi Mori

Color

Shinobu Mori

Animator

Makoto Morimoto

Music

Chiyomi Morisawa

Other

Kaoru Morita

Other

Noriko Moritomo

Animator

Kanako Moriya

Color

Haruyo Moriyoshi

Interpreter

Haruyo Moriyoshi

Other

Emiko Motohashi

Production

Masahiro Murakami

Special Effects

Mamoru Murao

Other

Yuki Murata

Production

Minoru Muroi

Production

Hisashi Nabetani

Other

Kyoko Naganawa

Other

Junko Nagaoka

Animator

Yoshiko Nagasaki

Other

Minako Nagasawa

Other

Sayuri Nagashima

Animator

Yoko Nagashima

Inbetweener

Kaoru Nakagama

Other

Rei Nakagome

Animator

Keiko Nakaji

Animator

Natsutoshi Nakamura

Animator

Daisuke Nakayama

Inbetweener

Yutaka Narita

Executive Producer

Reii Nidome

Inbetweener

Sumie Nishido

Inbetweener

Tomoaki Nishigiri

Production

Rie Nishijima

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Film Details

Also Known As
La princesa Mononoke, Mononoke Hime, Princesse Mononoke, princesa Mononoke
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Fantasy
Release Date
1999
Production Company
Studio Ghibli
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m
Color
Color
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85:1

Articles

Princess Mononoke


Set in the 14th century, Japanese director Hayao Miyazaki's film Princess Mononoke (1997) depicts a battle between human beings destroying the earth and the gods of the forest led by the wolf god Moro. During Japan's Muromachi Period, the film's hero Ashitaka is bitten by a demon-possessed wild boar and sets off on an epic journey for the deer-God Shishigami who can destroy the evil growing inside him. Ashitaka begins his adventure riding his faithful antelope-like steed Yakul. He comes upon an Iron Town presided over by Lady Eboshi who is stripping the forest of natural resources to make weapons. The Wolf God Moro and the human companion he has raised, San, battle Lady Eboshi's incursions into their domain. San communicates with the nature spirits in opposition to humankind and is the Princess Mononoke of the film's title. Miyazaki was greatly influenced by his intellectual and strong-willed mother whose personality can be seen in some of Miyazaki's notably tough, independent female characters including San and Lady Eboshi.

Ashitaka tries to find a way for humanity and nature to coexist in Miyazaki's story which is heavily influenced by Japanese folklore and history. In Japan, a mononoke translates to "spirit of a thing," a kind of ghost held responsible for everything from natural disasters to aches and pains.

But Japanese culture was not the only influence on Miyazaki's story. In the late Seventies Miyazaki made sketches involving a beautiful princess living in the forest with a beast in a storyline reminiscent of the classic fairy tale Beauty and the Beast. Ashitaka's quest, which takes him far from home, also echoes the classic novel Pilgrim's Progress and the ancient fable Gilgamesh. Drawing from a diverse narrative tradition, Miyazaki has also acknowledged the influence of contemporary life on his work, even seeing in Ashitaka's injury from the boar demon, a parallel to the modern scourge of AIDS, which also infects contemporary children with a curse and potential death sentence.

Princess Mononoke (1997) became the highest grossing Japanese film in that country's history, an honor previously held by E.T. (1982) until the release of James Cameron's Titanic (1997) unseated Miyazaki's status as the most successful film in that country. Princess Mononoke was later usurped as the country's second highest grossing Japanese Film by Miyazaki's Spirited Away (2001).

Princess Mononoke was acquired by Disney/Miramax for U.S. distribution and the contract specified that Disney could not make any changes to the film other than dubbing it. The script was rewritten by Neil Gaiman, to make its Japanese dialogue comprehensible to an English-speaking audience. The film was dubbed with the voices of famous English-speaking actors like Billy Bob Thornton and Billy Crudup. Ironically enough, Miyazaki has said that he does not like Disney movies - "I can't help but feel that it looks down on the audience."

"I think that a popular movie has to be full of true emotion, even if it's frivolous."

Hayao Miyazaki's film is anything but frivolous, containing a message of environmentalism and humanism within its engrossing action-adventure plot line. Princess Mononoke was the first of Miyazaki's films to utilize computer generated animation, in 15 minutes worth of the film's total 133 minute running time. Ten of those minutes were comprised of digital painting, but the bulk of the film is drawn by hand. The film boasts an unprecedented five art directors.

A perfectionist with an unusual degree of involvement in his films, Miyazaki personally checked all the animation in the film and redrew cels he was dissatisfied with, work generally left to a technical director. But Miyazaki has said his hands and eyes no longer allow him to work in this detailed a manner and that Princess Mononoke will be the last film he does under such rigorous scrutiny.

Themes of love, nature, the struggle of the weak against the strong are all recurring themes in Miyazaki's work and especially evident in Princess Mononoke. For Miyazaki, the Muromachi Period (1392-1573) in which the film is set marked a turning point in Japan's history, when instead of revering and worshiping nature, the Japanese began to exploit it, mining and clearing primeval forest land. In many ways the upheaval and confusion of that period echoes the similar tumult of our own age.

One of the key animators along with Isao Takahata, at the Japanese film Studio Ghibli, Miyazaki eventually became one of the Japanese film industry's greatest international successes and animation's heir to renowned directors like Akira Kurosawa. He has said he makes his films strictly with a Japanese audience in mind. As he told Newsweek, "Of course, I'm delighted that people from other countries also enjoy my films. But I try not to think of this as an international business."

PRINCESS MONONOKE (JAPANESE VERSION)
Producer: Yutaka Narita, Seiji Okuda, Toshio Suzuki, Yasuyoshi Tokuma, Seiichiro Ujiie
Director: Hayao Miyazaki
Screenplay: Hayao Miyazaki
Cinematography: Atsushi Okui
Film Editing: Hayao Miyazaki, Takeshi Seyama
Art Direction: Satoshi Kuroda, Kazuo Oga, Yoji Takeshige, Naoya Tanaka, Nizou Yamamoto
Music: Joe Hisaishi
Cast: Yoji Matsuda (Ashitaka), Yuriko Ishida (San), Yuko Tanaka (Eboshi-gozen), Kaoru Kobayashi (Jiko-bo), Masahiko Nishimura (Kouroku), Tsunehiko Kamijo (Gonza).
C-134m. Letterboxed.

PRINCESS MONONOKE (ENGLISH VERSION)
Producer: Scott Martin, Bob Weinstein, Harvey Weinstein
Director: Hayao Miyazaki
Screenplay: Hayao Miyazaki, Neil Gaiman
Cinematography: Atsushi Okui
Film Editing: Hayao Miyazaki, Takeshi Seyama
Art Direction: Satoshi Kuroda, Kazuo Oga, Yoji Takeshige, Naoya Tanaka, Nizou Yamamoto.

by Felicia Feaster
Princess Mononoke

Princess Mononoke

Set in the 14th century, Japanese director Hayao Miyazaki's film Princess Mononoke (1997) depicts a battle between human beings destroying the earth and the gods of the forest led by the wolf god Moro. During Japan's Muromachi Period, the film's hero Ashitaka is bitten by a demon-possessed wild boar and sets off on an epic journey for the deer-God Shishigami who can destroy the evil growing inside him. Ashitaka begins his adventure riding his faithful antelope-like steed Yakul. He comes upon an Iron Town presided over by Lady Eboshi who is stripping the forest of natural resources to make weapons. The Wolf God Moro and the human companion he has raised, San, battle Lady Eboshi's incursions into their domain. San communicates with the nature spirits in opposition to humankind and is the Princess Mononoke of the film's title. Miyazaki was greatly influenced by his intellectual and strong-willed mother whose personality can be seen in some of Miyazaki's notably tough, independent female characters including San and Lady Eboshi. Ashitaka tries to find a way for humanity and nature to coexist in Miyazaki's story which is heavily influenced by Japanese folklore and history. In Japan, a mononoke translates to "spirit of a thing," a kind of ghost held responsible for everything from natural disasters to aches and pains. But Japanese culture was not the only influence on Miyazaki's story. In the late Seventies Miyazaki made sketches involving a beautiful princess living in the forest with a beast in a storyline reminiscent of the classic fairy tale Beauty and the Beast. Ashitaka's quest, which takes him far from home, also echoes the classic novel Pilgrim's Progress and the ancient fable Gilgamesh. Drawing from a diverse narrative tradition, Miyazaki has also acknowledged the influence of contemporary life on his work, even seeing in Ashitaka's injury from the boar demon, a parallel to the modern scourge of AIDS, which also infects contemporary children with a curse and potential death sentence. Princess Mononoke (1997) became the highest grossing Japanese film in that country's history, an honor previously held by E.T. (1982) until the release of James Cameron's Titanic (1997) unseated Miyazaki's status as the most successful film in that country. Princess Mononoke was later usurped as the country's second highest grossing Japanese Film by Miyazaki's Spirited Away (2001). Princess Mononoke was acquired by Disney/Miramax for U.S. distribution and the contract specified that Disney could not make any changes to the film other than dubbing it. The script was rewritten by Neil Gaiman, to make its Japanese dialogue comprehensible to an English-speaking audience. The film was dubbed with the voices of famous English-speaking actors like Billy Bob Thornton and Billy Crudup. Ironically enough, Miyazaki has said that he does not like Disney movies - "I can't help but feel that it looks down on the audience." "I think that a popular movie has to be full of true emotion, even if it's frivolous." Hayao Miyazaki's film is anything but frivolous, containing a message of environmentalism and humanism within its engrossing action-adventure plot line. Princess Mononoke was the first of Miyazaki's films to utilize computer generated animation, in 15 minutes worth of the film's total 133 minute running time. Ten of those minutes were comprised of digital painting, but the bulk of the film is drawn by hand. The film boasts an unprecedented five art directors. A perfectionist with an unusual degree of involvement in his films, Miyazaki personally checked all the animation in the film and redrew cels he was dissatisfied with, work generally left to a technical director. But Miyazaki has said his hands and eyes no longer allow him to work in this detailed a manner and that Princess Mononoke will be the last film he does under such rigorous scrutiny. Themes of love, nature, the struggle of the weak against the strong are all recurring themes in Miyazaki's work and especially evident in Princess Mononoke. For Miyazaki, the Muromachi Period (1392-1573) in which the film is set marked a turning point in Japan's history, when instead of revering and worshiping nature, the Japanese began to exploit it, mining and clearing primeval forest land. In many ways the upheaval and confusion of that period echoes the similar tumult of our own age. One of the key animators along with Isao Takahata, at the Japanese film Studio Ghibli, Miyazaki eventually became one of the Japanese film industry's greatest international successes and animation's heir to renowned directors like Akira Kurosawa. He has said he makes his films strictly with a Japanese audience in mind. As he told Newsweek, "Of course, I'm delighted that people from other countries also enjoy my films. But I try not to think of this as an international business." PRINCESS MONONOKE (JAPANESE VERSION) Producer: Yutaka Narita, Seiji Okuda, Toshio Suzuki, Yasuyoshi Tokuma, Seiichiro Ujiie Director: Hayao Miyazaki Screenplay: Hayao Miyazaki Cinematography: Atsushi Okui Film Editing: Hayao Miyazaki, Takeshi Seyama Art Direction: Satoshi Kuroda, Kazuo Oga, Yoji Takeshige, Naoya Tanaka, Nizou Yamamoto Music: Joe Hisaishi Cast: Yoji Matsuda (Ashitaka), Yuriko Ishida (San), Yuko Tanaka (Eboshi-gozen), Kaoru Kobayashi (Jiko-bo), Masahiko Nishimura (Kouroku), Tsunehiko Kamijo (Gonza). C-134m. Letterboxed. PRINCESS MONONOKE (ENGLISH VERSION) Producer: Scott Martin, Bob Weinstein, Harvey Weinstein Director: Hayao Miyazaki Screenplay: Hayao Miyazaki, Neil Gaiman Cinematography: Atsushi Okui Film Editing: Hayao Miyazaki, Takeshi Seyama Art Direction: Satoshi Kuroda, Kazuo Oga, Yoji Takeshige, Naoya Tanaka, Nizou Yamamoto. by Felicia Feaster

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Awarded Japan's 1997 Academy prize for best film.

Released in United States Fall October 29, 1999

Limited Release in United States October 29, 1999

Expanded Release in United States November 5, 1999

Released in United States on Video August 8, 2000

Released in United States November 1997

Released in United States February 1998

Released in United States 1999

Released in United States September 1999

Released in United States October 1999

Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival November 1-10, 1997.

Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (in competition) February 11-22, 1998.

Shown at New York Film Festival (Special Event) September 24 - October 10, 1999.

Broadcast in Japan over Nippon Television Network January 22, 1999.

Currently, "Princess Mononoke" is Japan's all-time box office success with grosses surpassing $150 million.

Vistavision

dubbed English

Released in United States Fall October 29, 1999

Limited Release in United States October 29, 1999 (dubbed version)

Expanded Release in United States November 5, 1999 (dubbed version)

Released in United States on Video August 8, 2000

Released in United States November 1997 (Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival November 1-10, 1997.)

Released in United States February 1998 (Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (in competition) February 11-22, 1998.)

Released in United States 1999 (Shown at New York Film Festival (Special Event) September 24 - October 10, 1999.)

Released in United States September 1999 (Shown at Telluride Film Festival September 3-6, 1999.)

Released in United States October 1999 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles International Film Festival (Special Presentations - Screenings) October 21-29, 1999.)