Plain Clothes


1h 38m 1988

Brief Synopsis

Nick Dunbar, a baby-faced undercover policeman, poses as a high school student after a teacher is murdered. Back in school, Nick is subjected to bullies, crushes, and swings in popularity typical of most teenagers. Making matters worse, his brother is the prime suspect in the murder case. Nick wil

Film Details

Also Known As
Glory Days
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Arri Group; Cinema Research Corporation; Lorimar Studios; Technicolor; Tom Condon
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures; Paramount Home Media; Paramount Pictures
Location
Seattle, Washington, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Synopsis

Nick Dunbar, a baby-faced undercover policeman, poses as a high school student after a teacher is murdered. Back in school, Nick is subjected to bullies, crushes, and swings in popularity typical of most teenagers. Making matters worse, his brother is the prime suspect in the murder case. Nick will have to force himself to remember his true identity and focus on the investigation if he's to keep his brother from getting locked up for life.

Crew

Edward M. Abroms

Editor

Lynn Abroms

Apprentice Editor

Eric Allard

Special Effects Consultant

Angela Alston

Production Assistant

Sherry Anders

Makeup Assistant

Sherry Anders

Hairstyles Assistant

Katsumi Aoyama

Driver

William Apperson

Art Direction

Gretchen Armstrong

Other

Teresa Austin

Makeup

Berton Averre

Songs ("Uptown Showdown" "Normal As The Next Guy")

Christy Bain

Wardrobe Assistant

Kevin Barry

Production Assistant

Robin Beauchesne

Hairstyles Assistant

Robin Beauchesne

Makeup Assistant

Bruce Benson

Carpenter

Carolyn Broner

Music Supervisor Assistant

Ray Brown

Special Effects Assistant

Jackie Burch

Casting

Robert K Burns

Carpenter

John C Cales

Carpenter

Michael Callahan

Casting Assistant (Extras)

Robert Calnan

Electrician

James Campbell

Original Music

Nancy Campbell

Casting (Extras)

Frank Capra

2nd Assistant Director

Katie Carmichael

Property Master Assistant

Joann Cary

Construction Laborer

Ferne Cassel

Casting Assistant

Spencer Chrislu

Music Score Mixer; Music Score Recording

Donna Cipriani

Production Auditor

Nigel Clinker

Set Dresser

Clay Collins

Sound Editor

Bobby Colomby

Music Supervisor

Tom Condon

Cable Operator

Jodie Cortez

Song ("Ain'T Got Nobody")

Phil Culotta

Stunts

Laurie Dalton

Craft Services

Lori Davis

Hairstyles Consultant

Mark Shane Davis

1st Company Grip

Carlos Delarios

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Leo Demarre

Driver

Tony Demore

Carpenter

Rudy Dillon

Key Costumer

David Dobson

Caterer

Lamont Dozier

Song ("Nowhere To Run")

Joe Dugan

Honeywagon Driver

Michael Einfeld

Casting Assistant (Seattle)

George Evans

Transportation Captain

Steve Eyrse

Other

Patricia Fay

Location Manager

Doug Fieger

Songs ("She Says" "Uptown Showdown" "Normal As The Next Guy")

Jamie Fishman

Wardrobe Assistant

Kerry Flanagan

Electrician

Dave Florence

Construction Coordinator

Veronica Flynn

Script Supervisor

Scott Frank

From Story

Scott Frank

Screenwriter

Steven Frank

Hairstyles

Kristina Garfield

Assistant Editor

Michilu Gargiulo

Camera Assistant

Virginia Giritlian

Assistance

Dan Gleich

Sound Mixer

Don Goldman

Unit Production Manager

Don Goldman

Associate Producer

Jose Jesus Gonzales

Decorator Assistant

Anne Gordon

Animal Handler

Bruce Gowdy

Song ("Ain'T Got Nobody")

Laura Graham

Sound Editor Assistant

Peter Gries

1st Assistant Director

Tina Grzesiek

Craft Services Assistant

Brad Grzesliek

Driver

Robert Haimer

Song ("You'Re Rich")

Daniel Hainey

Director Of Photography

Aaron Harney

Decorator Assistant

Lisa Harper

Grip

Steven Hauge

Illustrator

Don Hayashi

1st Assistant Camera

Paul Hoffmann

Carpenter

Brian Holland

Song ("Nowhere To Run")

Edward Holland

Song ("Nowhere To Run")

Clarence Holter

Driver

Jim Hovey

Carpenter

Holly Huckins

Sound Editor Assistant

Melissa Hudson

Decorator Assistant

Steven Charles Jaffe

Executive Producer

Marya Delia Javier

Set Decorator

John Jensen

Driver

Colleen Kennedy

Art Direction Assistant

Patrick Kennedy

Editor

Dannen King

Decorator Assistant

Jacqueline Kinney

Production Assistant

Robert Klane

Carpenter

Nikita Knatz

Illustrator

Michael J Kohut

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Allison Koon

Wardrobe Assistant

George Kramer

Driver

Jim Lang

Song Producer ("She Says" "Uptown Showdown" "Nowhere To Run" "Normal As The Next Guy")

Stephen Lang

Grip

Michael Levesque

Production Designer

Michel Levesque

Production Designer

Peggy Lindley

Production Assistant

Lachlin Loud

Set Designer

Martin Malakoff

Driver

Michael Manheim

Producer

Peter Matz

Music Conductor

Anthony Mazzucchi

2nd Company Grip

Eugene Mccarthy

Property Master

Robert Mcclure

Chief Lighting Technician

Leslie Mcgovern

Wardrobe Supervisor

Gary Mcnally

Other

Matthew Neal Mcvay

Stills

John Michener

Props Assistant

Paul Miera

Production Assistant

Franklin Mills

Electrician

Jay Miracle

Sound Editor

Fred Mirante

Driver

Richard A Mitchell

Electrician

Wayne Montanio

Stunts

Kristi Morais

Dga Trainee

Billy Mumy

Song ("You'Re Rich")

Christopher Notarthomas

Assistant Editor

Mark O'kane

2nd Camera Operator

Mark O'kane

Steadicam Operator

Michael Papale

Music Consultant

Mary Patrao

Music Editor Assistant

Don Penick

Driver

Phil Perry

Song Performer ("Goodbye")

Larsen Peterson

Wardrobe Assistant

Jack Poore

Decorator Assistant

Monica Powell

Location Manager Assistant

Russ Powell

Transportation Coordinator

Jennifer Prince

Stunts

Richard Puga

Other

Ryan Purcell

Decorator Assistant

Brian Rasmussen

Grip

Michael Rider

Carpenter

Bob Riggs

Special Effects

Chip Robinson

Driver

Aaron Rochin

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Bob Rolsky

2nd Assistant Director

Valerie Ros

Production Office Coordinator Assistant

Allan K Rosen

Music Editor Supervisor

Paul Rosenblum

Assistant (To Martha Coolidge)

Joan Rosenfelt

Other

Sarah Rothenberg

Sound Editor Assistant

Leslie Rowan

Assistant (To Producers)

Joan Rowe

Foley Walker

Katey Sagal

Song Performer ("Ain'T Got Nobody")

Edward Saguin

Decorator Assistant

Julian Saguin

Decorator Assistant

Scilla Scandiuzzi

Wardrobe Supervisor

Allisn Schmidt

Craft Services Assistant

William Seavers

Driver

Leslie Shatz

Sound Editor Supervisor

Billy Sherwood

Song Performer ("Ain'T Got Nobody" "You'Re Idea Of A Good Time" "You Can Count On Me")

Billy Sherwood

Song Producer ("Goodbye" "Ain'T Got Nobody" "You'Re Idea Of A Good Time" "You Can Count On Me"), Songs

Janet Siegel

Production Office Coordinator

Jeffrey Silverman

Song; Song Producer ("Goodbye")

Mary Ann Skweres

Sound Editor Assistant

Cheryl Smith

2nd Assistant Camera

Todd Q Smith

Other

Carl Smool

Sculptor

Carl Smool

Other

Jim Stanley

Assistant Editor

Anthony Starbuck

Boom Operator

Guy Steiner

Song; Song Producer ("Goodbye")

Spooky Stevens

Publicist

Karen Strickland

Driver

Robert Sullivan

Driver

Suellyn Tackitt

Decorator Assistant

William Taft

Driver

George Talley

Assistant Editor

Jeff Taylor

Carpenter

Sarah Taylor

Song; Song Producer ("You'Re Rich")

Sarah Taylor

Song Performer

Susan Towner

Production Auditor Assistant

Jerry Trent

Foley

Carrie Turcott

Construction Laborer

Ray Turnberg

Construction Foreman

Tracy Tynan

Costume Designer

Edward J Ulrich

Stunt Coordinator

Sandra Vaughan

Production Assistant (Los Angeles)

Dan Vining

From Story

Jim Voorhees

Props Assistant

Glen Walker

Driver

Dan Wallin

Music Recording (Orchestra)

Gary Wattman

Dolly Grip

Josie Wechsler

Decorator Assistant

Richard Wechsler

Producer

Bob Weitz

Stereo Consultant

Ron Welch

Caterer

Gary White-wiegand

Electrician

Charles Whitmore

Special Effects Assistant

John Wildermuth

Production Assistant

Scott Wilk

Music

Al Williams

Other

Ken Williams

Driver

Jeanine Wilson

Production Assistant

Quintin Woo

Chief Lighting Technician Assistant

Film Details

Also Known As
Glory Days
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Arri Group; Cinema Research Corporation; Lorimar Studios; Technicolor; Tom Condon
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures; Paramount Home Media; Paramount Pictures
Location
Seattle, Washington, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Articles

Robert Stack, 1919-2003


Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84.

Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling.

Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger.

Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen.

His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942).

After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958).

Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name.

Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980).

Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles.

by Michael T. Toole
Robert Stack, 1919-2003

Robert Stack, 1919-2003

Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84. Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling. Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger. Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen. His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942). After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958). Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name. Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980). Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video October 26, 1988

Released in United States Spring April 15, 1988

Began shooting May 6, 1987.

Ultra-Stereo

Released in United States Spring April 15, 1988

Released in United States on Video October 26, 1988