Out to Sea


1h 46m 1997

Brief Synopsis

Herb and Charlie, a couple of mis-matched brothers-in-law, are hired by a cruise ship to dance with widowed women. Trouble ensues, however, when they begin scheming to cheat some of the women out of their money. While Charlie continues to chase the beautiful and wealthy Liz, Herb unexpectedly finds

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Florida, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 46m

Synopsis

Herb and Charlie, a couple of mis-matched brothers-in-law, are hired by a cruise ship to dance with widowed women. Trouble ensues, however, when they begin scheming to cheat some of the women out of their money. While Charlie continues to chase the beautiful and wealthy Liz, Herb unexpectedly finds romance with Vivian, who has been brought aboard by her daughter and son-in-law in an attempt to show her a good time.

Crew

Russell Adcock

Consultant

Cynthia Aguilar

Production Auditor

Ulrika Akander

Dialogue Editor

Howard Anderson

Titles And Opticals

Pedro Antonio

Other

Thomas Apted

Assistant Sound Editor

Louis Armstrong

Song Performer

Michael Armstrong

Props

Seth Arnett

Stunts

Joseph M Aspromonti

Assistant Director

Herb Ault

Key Grip

Eddie Avila

Production Assistant

Christine Axelrod Tope

Assistant Director

Randall Badger

Assistant Director

Greg J Barber

Props

Elinor Bardach

Costume Supervisor

Count Basie

Song

John Beck

Props

Bob Beemer

Rerecording

Robert Bell

Song

Ronald Bell

Song

Pablo Beltran Ruiz

Song

Barry Berg

Executive Producer

Barry Berg

Unit Production Manager

Irving Berlin

Song

Kirt Birch

Production Assistant

Kim Blank

Choreographer

Donna Bloom

Unit Production Manager

Chris Boardman

Music Producer

Chris Boardman

Song

James Bolt

Rerecording

Tracy Bolt

Other

Bruce Botnick

Other

Mike Boyle

Animal Wrangler

Brooke Brooks

Assistant

Einstein Brown

Song

George Brown

Song

Mike Brown

Helicopter Pilot

Jackie Burch

Casting

Tom Burdett

Other

Johnny Burke

Song

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Gregory R Campbell

Props

Peter Campbell

Other

Tom Cantrell

Electrician

Tony Capasso

Props

Ted Caplan

Foley Editor

Kyle Carden

Grip

Gary Carlson

Other

Hoagy Carmichael

Song

Juan M Carrion

Production

Don L Cash

Makeup Artist

Cindy Cassel

Assistant

Paul Catapano

Props

Hazel Catmull

Hair Stylist

Jules Chaikin

Other

James Chawkin

Assistant Location Manager

Greg Cheever

Other

Mary Cheung

Costumes

Andy Chilcoat

Other

Marcello Ciorciolini

Song

Roydon Clark

Stunt Coordinator

Tim Clark

Visual Effects

Rich Cline

On-Set Dresser

Anne V. Coates

Editor

Marne Cohen

Other

William C Coleman

Production Assistant

Bryan Corbett

Props

Lauren Cory

Set Designer

Frank Lucky Costello

Other

Doug Cowden

Best Boy Grip

Ronald Croci

Visual Effects

Phil Culotta

Stunts

Vern Curry

Other

Bobby Darin

Song Performer

Debbi Datz-pyle

Other

John Davis

Producer

Ross C Day

Location Manager

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Brad Dean

Apprentice

Sara Decesare

Assistant

Brad Dechter

Original Music

Karen Dejong

Visual Effects

Rodney Delaplane

Other

Greg Dennen

Other

Patrick Denver

Visual Effects

Eumir Deodato

Song

Alberto Dominguez

Song

Richard Bryan Douglas

Props

Tim Downs

Props

Al Dubin

Song

Arnie Durazo

Props

Gus Duron

Other

Bruce Duvall

Painter

Janet Earl

Visual Effects

Jim Early

Props

Ron Epstein

Props

James Eric

Other

Mark Eshelman

Other

Glen R. Feldman

Assistant Property Master

Ed Felix

Special Effects Coordinator

Mike Fenster

Transportation Coordinator

Bonnie Fernimen

Other

Maryann Filer

Assistant Production Coordinator

Lupe Fischer

Costumes

John Flynn

Props

Nancy Fogarty

Music

Andre Fortin

Consultant

Dan Foster

Production Manager

Marty Frasu

Music Arranger

David Friendly

Producer

Giancarlo Ganziano

Video

Sean Garnhart

Sound Effects Editor

Andy Gauvreau

3-D Artist

Rickie Joe Gee

Other

Jeff Gershman

Steadicam Operator

Bonny Giardina

Assistant

Alex Gibson

Music Editor

Pat Gilligan

Other

Mark Gillson

Other

Norman Gimbel

Song

Don Givens

Foley Artist

Mack Gordon

Song

Marilyn Graf

Foley Mixer

Lee Green

Props

Wendy Greiner

Costumes

Greg Griffith

On-Set Dresser

Laurah Grijalva

Special Effects

Sarah Grossman

Associate Producer

Ed Gutentag

Camera Assistant

Daniel Hamuy

Original Music

Erik Haraldsted

Special Effects

Jeffrey Harris

Production Auditor

Todd Harris

Assistant Sound Editor

Rick Hart

Rerecording

Gustavo Hernandez

Other

Jose Clemente Hernandez

Dga Trainee

Darryl Herzon

Electrician

Phil Hetos

Color Timer

Ellen Heuer

Foley Artist

Eddie Heywood

Song

Eddie Hice

Stunts

Richard Hill

Props

Chris Hogarth

Other

Chris Howell

Stunt Coordinator

Kelly Huff

Other

Christine Hurrey

Accountant

Eric Ingraham

Props

Jim Ingraham

Foreman

Randy Ingraham

Props

Tom Ivanjack

Other

Robert Nelson Jacobs

Screenplay

Robert Nelson Jacobs

Song

Danny Jacobson

Screenplay

Ramiro G Jaloma

Unit Production Manager

Loren Janes

Stunts

Xandy Janko

Original Music

Bob Jason

Lighting Technician

Richard Jerebicz

Props

Leif Jonsson

Special Effects

Petko Kadiev

Visual Effects

Dotti Karlstein

Consultant

Peter Karp

Assistant

Robert E Kay

Production Assistant

Scott Kennedy

On-Set Dresser

Josh Kesselman

Assistant

Susan Kistler

Assistant Costume Designer

R. J. Kizer

Adr Supervisor

Jerry Knight

Props

Joyce Kogut

Costumes

Leslie Kolbeins

Props

Lajos Koltai

Director Of Photography

Gene Kozicki

Production Manager

Greg Kozikowski

Video

David Krueger

Production Assistant

Mark Landon

Makeup Artist

Derrick Landry

Production Auditor

Kevin Landry

Production Auditor

Vanessa Lapato

Adr Editor

Steve Laporte

Makeup Supervisor

John A. Larsen

Sound Editor

Robert Leitelt

Key Rigging Grip

Mary Leitz

2-D Artist

John Leletzopoulos

Other

Clint Lilley

Stunts

Diane Linn

Adr

Paul Litteken

Props

Dorothea Long Mackenzie

Hair Stylist

Jose Lopez

Other

Marilyn Madsen

Costumes

Garth Majors

Props

Cindy Marty

Dialogue Editor

William F Matthews

Art Director

Chris Mcbee

Hair Stylist

Dennis Mccarthy

Costumes

J D Mccarthy

Craft Service

Brian Mccarty

Sound

Connie Mccauley

Assistant

Sue Mcclean

Other

Van Mccoy

Song Performer

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Florida, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 46m

Articles

Donald O'Connor, 1925-2003


Donald O'Connor, the sprightly, acrobatic dancer-comedian who was unforgettable in his exhilarating "Make 'em Laugh" number in the classic musical Singin' in the Rain, died of heart failure at the Motion Picture Country Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills, California on September 27. He was 78.

Born Donald David Dixon O' Connor in Chicago on August 28, 1925, he was raised in an atmosphere of show business. His parents were circus trapeze artists and later vaudeville entertainers, and as soon as young Donald was old enough to walk, he was performing in a variety of dance and stunt routines all across the country. Discovered by a film scout at age 11, he made his film debut with two of his brothers in Melody for Two (1937), and was singled out for a contract by Paramount Pictures. He co-starred with Bing Crosby and Fred MacMurray in Sing, You Sinners (1938) and played juvenile roles in several films, including Huckleberry Finn in Tom Sawyer - Detective (1938) and the title character as a child in Beau Geste (1939).

As O'Connor grew into adolescence, he fared pretty well as a youthful hoofer, dancing up a storm in a string of low-budget, but engaging musicals for Universal Studios (often teamed with the equally vigorous Peggy Ryan) during World War II. Titles like What's Cookin', Get Hep to Love (both 1942), Chip Off the Old Block and Strictly in the Groove (both 1943) made for some fairly innocuous entertainment, but they went a long way in displaying O'Connor's athletic dancing and boyish charm. As an adult, O'Connor struck paydirt again when he starred opposite a talking mule (with a voice supplied by Chill Wills) in the enormously popular Francis (1949). The story about an Army private who discovers that only he can communicate with a talking army mule, proved to be a very profitable hit with kids, and Universal went on to star him in several sequels.

Yet if O'Connor had to stake his claim to cinematic greatness, it would unquestionably be his daringly acrobatic, brazenly funny turn as Cosmo Brown, Gene Kelly's sidekick in the brilliant Singin' in the Rain (1952). Although his self-choreographed routine of "Make "Em Laugh" (which includes a mind-bending series of backflips off the walls) is often singled out as the highlight, in truth, his whole performance is one of the highlights of the film. His deft comic delivery of one-liners, crazy facial expressions (just watch him lampoon the diction teacher in the glorious "Moses Supposes" bit) and exhilarating dance moves (the opening "Fit As a Fiddle" number with Kelly to name just one) throughout the film are just sheer film treats in any critic's book.

After the success of Singin' in the Rain, O'Connor proved that he had enough charisma to command his first starring vehicle, opposite Debbie Reynolds, in the cute musical I Love Melvin (1953). He also found good parts in Call Me Madam (1953), There's No Business Like Show Business (1954), and Anything Goes (1956). Unfortunately, his one attempt at a strong dramatic role, the lead in the weak biopic The Buster Keaton Story (1957) proved to be misstep, and he was panned by the critics.

By the '60s, the popularity of musicals had faded, and O'Connor spent the next several years supporting himself with many dinner theater and nightclub appearances; but just when it looked like we wouldn't see O'Connor's talent shine again on the small or big screen, he found himself in demand at the dawn of the '90s in a string of TV appearances: Murder She Wrote, Tales From the Crypt, Fraser, The Nanny; and movies: Robin Williams' toy-manufacturer father in Toys (1992), a fellow passenger in the Lemmon-Matthau comedy, Out to Sea (1997), that were as welcoming as they were heartening. Survivors include his wife, Gloria; four children, Alicia, Donna, Fred and Kevin; and four grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Donald O'connor, 1925-2003

Donald O'Connor, 1925-2003

Donald O'Connor, the sprightly, acrobatic dancer-comedian who was unforgettable in his exhilarating "Make 'em Laugh" number in the classic musical Singin' in the Rain, died of heart failure at the Motion Picture Country Home and Hospital in Woodland Hills, California on September 27. He was 78. Born Donald David Dixon O' Connor in Chicago on August 28, 1925, he was raised in an atmosphere of show business. His parents were circus trapeze artists and later vaudeville entertainers, and as soon as young Donald was old enough to walk, he was performing in a variety of dance and stunt routines all across the country. Discovered by a film scout at age 11, he made his film debut with two of his brothers in Melody for Two (1937), and was singled out for a contract by Paramount Pictures. He co-starred with Bing Crosby and Fred MacMurray in Sing, You Sinners (1938) and played juvenile roles in several films, including Huckleberry Finn in Tom Sawyer - Detective (1938) and the title character as a child in Beau Geste (1939). As O'Connor grew into adolescence, he fared pretty well as a youthful hoofer, dancing up a storm in a string of low-budget, but engaging musicals for Universal Studios (often teamed with the equally vigorous Peggy Ryan) during World War II. Titles like What's Cookin', Get Hep to Love (both 1942), Chip Off the Old Block and Strictly in the Groove (both 1943) made for some fairly innocuous entertainment, but they went a long way in displaying O'Connor's athletic dancing and boyish charm. As an adult, O'Connor struck paydirt again when he starred opposite a talking mule (with a voice supplied by Chill Wills) in the enormously popular Francis (1949). The story about an Army private who discovers that only he can communicate with a talking army mule, proved to be a very profitable hit with kids, and Universal went on to star him in several sequels. Yet if O'Connor had to stake his claim to cinematic greatness, it would unquestionably be his daringly acrobatic, brazenly funny turn as Cosmo Brown, Gene Kelly's sidekick in the brilliant Singin' in the Rain (1952). Although his self-choreographed routine of "Make "Em Laugh" (which includes a mind-bending series of backflips off the walls) is often singled out as the highlight, in truth, his whole performance is one of the highlights of the film. His deft comic delivery of one-liners, crazy facial expressions (just watch him lampoon the diction teacher in the glorious "Moses Supposes" bit) and exhilarating dance moves (the opening "Fit As a Fiddle" number with Kelly to name just one) throughout the film are just sheer film treats in any critic's book. After the success of Singin' in the Rain, O'Connor proved that he had enough charisma to command his first starring vehicle, opposite Debbie Reynolds, in the cute musical I Love Melvin (1953). He also found good parts in Call Me Madam (1953), There's No Business Like Show Business (1954), and Anything Goes (1956). Unfortunately, his one attempt at a strong dramatic role, the lead in the weak biopic The Buster Keaton Story (1957) proved to be misstep, and he was panned by the critics. By the '60s, the popularity of musicals had faded, and O'Connor spent the next several years supporting himself with many dinner theater and nightclub appearances; but just when it looked like we wouldn't see O'Connor's talent shine again on the small or big screen, he found himself in demand at the dawn of the '90s in a string of TV appearances: Murder She Wrote, Tales From the Crypt, Fraser, The Nanny; and movies: Robin Williams' toy-manufacturer father in Toys (1992), a fellow passenger in the Lemmon-Matthau comedy, Out to Sea (1997), that were as welcoming as they were heartening. Survivors include his wife, Gloria; four children, Alicia, Donna, Fred and Kevin; and four grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer July 2, 1997

Released in United States on Video December 30, 1997

Herb Ross was previously attached to direct.

Began shooting September 11, 1996.

Completed shooting December 20, 1996.

Production went on hiatus from November 21 to December 14, 1996 while Jack Lemmon received the Kennedy Center Honors in Washington D.C.

Released in United States Summer July 2, 1997

Released in United States on Video December 30, 1997