Little Indian, Big City


1h 30m 1996

Brief Synopsis

Successful Parisian businessman Stephan Marchado is in for the surprise of his life when, after thirteen years of separation from his wife Patricia, who now lives in South America, he ventures deep into the heart of the remote rain forest to get her to sign a formal divorce agreement. He didn't know

Film Details

Also Known As
Indian in Paris, An, Indian in the City, Little Indian, Big City, Un Indien dans la ville
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
CINEPIX FILM PROPERTIES PRODUCTIONS (CFP)/WALT DISNEY STUDIOS DISTRIBUTION
Location
Paris, France; Venezuela

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

Successful Parisian businessman Stephan Marchado is in for the surprise of his life when, after thirteen years of separation from his wife Patricia, who now lives in South America, he ventures deep into the heart of the remote rain forest to get her to sign a formal divorce agreement. He didn't know that his wife was pregnant when she left him several years ago. And now, after all this time, he finds that he has a son, who has been raised as an Indian and given the Indian name Mimi-Siku, who has grown into a mischievous young boy with a fondness for playing with poisoned blow darts. Stephan promises his son that some day--when he becomes a man--he will take him to visit the "big city" where he lives. That very night, unaware of the meaning of the Indian ritual which Stephan observes by firelight, he watches as his son participates in the sacred process of "becoming a man." He's further astonished when he becomes aware that he must keep his promise or risk losing the respect of his newfound son.

Crew

Philippe Abitbol

Music Producer

Michelle Andreucci

Script Supervisor

Igor Aptekman

Screenplay

Isabelle Arnal

Unit Production Manager

Vincent Arnardi

Sound

Patrick Batteux

Executive Producer

Gregory Baubeau

Apprentice

Roland Baubeau

Editor

Muriel Baurens

Makeup

Louis Becker

Producer

Jean-marie Benoit

Best Boy

Mary Kay Bergman

Other

Juan Blaha

Helicopter Pilot

Sophie Blanvillain

Casting Associate

Francoise Bouillon-pommerolle

Production Supervisor

Jean-pierre Bouvier

Stunts

Hiram Brito

Animal Trainer

Philippe Bruneau

Other

Corey Burton

Other

Remi Canaple

Stunts

Eric Canu

Other

Guy Canu

Grip

Thierry Canu

Dolly Grip

Delfina Catala

Executive Producer

Patrick Cauderlier

Stunts

Benoît Chamaillard

Assistant Camera Operator

Marie Cheminal

Assistant Art Director

Claude Chiericci

Other

Capucine Chotard

Screenplay

Arthur Cloquet

Camera Operator

Edith Colnel

Production Manager

Erasmo Colon

Propman

Gilles Conseil

Stunts

Fabio Conversi

Director Of Photography

Luigi Conversi

Assistant Camera Operator

Jim Cummings

Other

Francois Darminy

Photography

Thierry Daucheron

Gaffer

Tonton David

Original Music

Philippe Verger De L'epitre

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Serge Ladron Deguevara

Unit Manager Assistant

Laurent Delahaye

Gaffer

Arthur Deleu

Other

Hilda Deluca

Production Manager

Guy Demazure

Animal Trainer

Rick Dempsey

Sound

Patrick Deranter

Steadicam Operator

Laurent Duquesnoy

Best Boy Grip

Frederic Echelard

Sound

Christiane Escale

Casting Associate

Marie-beatrice Eynard

Storyboard Artist

Patrice Fasola

Other

Annick Filley

Assistant Editor

Jean-paul Gaillot

Construction Coordinator

Martin Garanger

Other

Ammanuel Gimenes

Production Supervisor

Theodore E Gluck

Post-Production Supervisor

Raphael Gomez

Set Designer

Gaia Gorrini

Assistant Director

Vladimir Hermoso

Interpreter

Valerie Houbart

Other

Christine Janeau

Unit Manager Assistant

Manu Katche

Original Music

Marie Kerhoas

Other

Marc Koenincks

Steadicam Operator

David Koskas

Photography

Thierry Lebon

Sound Mixer

Armelle Lecoeur

Production Assistant

Marie Legardeur

Casting Associate

Emmanuel Legrand

Assistant Director

Jean-pierre Lelong

Sound Effects

Jean-francois Lemaire

Special Effects

Jean-marie Leroy

Photography

Thierry Lhermitte

Sound

Thierry Lhermitte

Other

Thierry Lhermitte

Producer

Stephane Lioret

Boom Operator

Oscar Lobo

Assistant Camera Operator

Zoraida Lopez

Other

Pierre Lorrain

Sound

P'tit Louis

Propman

Liz Mago

Production Coordinator

Ivan Maussion

Production Designer

Mario Melchiori

Sound

Michel Mery

Production

Pierre Mery

Production

Ana Iris Miranda

Production Supervisor

Pierre Morel

Steadicam Operator

Agathe Moro

Hairdresser

Alain Nauroy

Assistant Director

Roland Neunreuther

Stunts

Daisy Nichols

Production Manager

Dries Von Notten

Special Thanks To

Nora Ortega

Unit Manager

Geoffrey Oryema

Original Music

Herve Palud

Other

Herve Palud

Screenplay

Xavier Palud

Apprentice

Christine Pansu

Sound Editor

Pascal Pasola

Other

Rob Paulsen

Other

Valentine Perrin

Assistant Camera Operator

Daniel Pesquer

Production

Eric Pierre

Makeup

Sandrine Plaud

Assistant Editor

Alter Production

Executive Producer

Martine Rapin

Costume Designer

Carlos Reyes

Casting Director

Gil Robillard

Makeup

Frank Rojas

Sound

Orlando Rosales

Assistant Director

Le Cedre Rouge

Special Thanks To

Virginie Denis Roy

Assistant Art Director

Antoine Santana

Assistant Director

Bernard Schlegel

Other

Mark Steilen

Writer (Adaptation)

Mark Steilen

Screenplay

Fred Taieb

Sound

Marie Tardieu

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Patrick Timsit

Screenplay

Jean-louis Trinquier

Special Effects

Gisele Tsobanian

Production Assistant

Daniel Verite

Stunts

Philippe Videcoq

Writer (Adaptation)

Philippe Videcoq

Screenplay

Virginia Vogwill

Wardrobe Supervisor

Bennett Yellin

Screenplay

Bennett Yellin

Writer (Adaptation)

Monica Zakkay

Screenplay

Film Details

Also Known As
Indian in Paris, An, Indian in the City, Little Indian, Big City, Un Indien dans la ville
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
CINEPIX FILM PROPERTIES PRODUCTIONS (CFP)/WALT DISNEY STUDIOS DISTRIBUTION
Location
Paris, France; Venezuela

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)


Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70.

He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950).

After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor.

Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez.

Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati.

Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70. He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950). After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor. Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati. Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring March 22, 1996

Released in United States on Video May 19, 1998

Released in United States Spring March 22, 1996

Released in United States on Video May 19, 1998