The Hi-Lo Country


1h 54m 1998

Brief Synopsis

In the prairie town of Hi-Lo, New Mexico, Pete and Big Boy return from World War II to their old way of life: raising cattle and working the land. Able to hold their own with other men, and popular with women, they are masters of the land that they are proud to call home. But Pete has always pined f

Film Details

Also Known As
Hi-Lo Country
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
Gramercy Pictures
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Synopsis

In the prairie town of Hi-Lo, New Mexico, Pete and Big Boy return from World War II to their old way of life: raising cattle and working the land. Able to hold their own with other men, and popular with women, they are masters of the land that they are proud to call home. But Pete has always pined for Mona, who is now married to someone else. Pete resigns himself to this loss, and returns to steady girlfriend Josepha. When he discovers that Mona is having a passionate affair with Big Boy, his desires are reawakened and his friendship put into question. Mona represents everything that Pete yearns for but cannot have.

Crew

Douglas Neal Acton

Medic

James Allen

Driver

Joan Altman

Production Auditor

Jimmy Dale Anderson

Stunts

Lindsay Anderson

Other

Lee Archuleta

Other

Eddy Arnold

Song

Laura Auldridge

Assistant

Sydney R Baldwin

Photography

Dianne Barnes

Apprentice

David M. Barrett

Stunts

Jim Barth

Other

Marsha Barton

Other

Thomas J Barton

Other

John Beauvais

Other

Dana Belcastro

Production Supervisor

John Bell

Original Music

Bridget Bergman

Makeup

Dan Berryman

Driver

James D Berryman

Driver

David L Bethel

Medic

Tim Bevan

Producer

Joey Box

Stunts

Greg Bronner

Transportation Co-Captain

Bob F Brown

Stunts

Craig Brown

Other

Kayce Brown

Production Assistant

Ryan Brown

Stunts

Troy Brown

Stunts

Valdia Buchwald

Other

Maurice Burns

Other

Billy Burton

Stunts

Carter Burwell

Music Conductor

Carter Burwell

Music

John C Cameron

Assistant Property Master

Gretchen Campbell

Assistant

Benette Cantu

Driver

Francisco Cantu

Song

Harry Carey Jr.

Special Thanks To

Christopher Carter

Assistant

Jenne Casarotto

Special Thanks To

Will Cascio

Stunts

Steve Chambers

Stunts

Liza Chasin

Coproducer

Rashid Chinchanwala

Consultant

James E Christian

Driver

Art Claunch

Driver

Rob Cohen

Dolly Grip

Jerry Colbeigh

Animal Trainer

Kim Coleman

Casting Associate

Will J Collins

Driver

Ed Collyer

Foley Mixer

Jeff Couch

Transportation Captain

Ken Coulman

Other

Keith Cox

Construction Coordinator

Mary Cybulski

Script Supervisor

J Patrick Daily

Key Grip

Mitch Dalton

Music

Wayne Daniell

Driver

Siduri Davey

Production Assistant

Jason Davis

On-Set Dresser

Steve M Davison

Stunts

Thomas S Dawson

Costume Supervisor

Barbara De Fina

Producer

Anuree Desilva

Assistant Editor

Thomas C Dilbeck

Song

Shane Dixon

Stunts

Shirley Dolle

Hair Stylist

Juliette Dow

Assistant

Lindsay Elliott

Driver

Paul Ensby

Color Timer

Sherry Erickson

Special Thanks To

Pam Erwin

Other

Harland Espeset

Grip

Tobin Espeset

Production Assistant

Gilbert Espinosa

Other

Jesse Esquibel

Driver

Troy Esquibel

Location Assistant

Charles T Esty

Best Boy

Max Evans

Source Material (From Novel)

H. P. Evetts

Stunts

Albert Eylar

Other

Kip Farnsworth

Stunts

Michael Farrow

Other

Mike Feinberg

Foley Editor

Eric Fellner

Producer

Jan Fleischer

Special Thanks To

David A Foster

Location Manager

Vic Fraser

Music

Brian Fuller

Loader

Lisa Garcia

Stand-In

Jerry Gardner

Driver

David Gertz

Adr Mixer

William D Gethin-jones

Other

Peter Gleese

Adr Mixer

A Gomez-orozco

Song

Mark Goodermote

Boom Operator

Allan Graf

Stunts

Robin Green

Production Coordinator

Walon Green

Screenplay

Isobel Griffiths

Music Conductor

Pauline Griffiths

Foley Artist

David Haldeman

Driver

James Halty

Stunts

Paul Hamblin

Rerecording

Isabel Harkins

Makeup Artist

Tarn Harper

Post-Production Accountant

Steve Harrow

Production Consultant

Maurice Hatton

Other

Susan Hegarty

Dialect Coach

Juli Heinen

Other

Stefan Henrix

Sound Editor

Hank Herrera

Grip

Stuart Hilliker

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Rich Hintze

Other

Masahiro Hirakubo

Editor

Sean Hobin

Assistant Director

Robert G Hoelen

Grip

Dale Holmen

Lighting Technician

Kimmer Howell

Stunts

Norman Howell

Stunts

Shawn Howell

Stunt Coordinator

Laurie Hudson

Set Costumer

Jerry Irby

Song

Jake Jackson

Assistant Engineer

Julian Jackson

Music

Askia Won-ling Jacob

Costumes

Matt D Johnston

Stunts

L Dean Jones

Assistant Director

Mike Justus

Stunts

Olof Kallstrom

Assistant Editor

Lelan Keffer

On-Set Dresser

Andy Kennedy

Sound Effects Editor

Angela Kent

Accounting Assistant

Nina Khoshaba

Other

Sonny Kompanek

Other

Drew Kunin

Sound Recordist

A. Welch Lambeth

Transportation Coordinator

Leon Lebow

Driver

Erica Levy

Assistant

Joe Lewis

Driver

Marc Coady Lieb

Props

Cris Lombardi

Camera Operator

Bill Lopez

Driver

Sam Lucero

Driver

Narciso Martinez

Song

Timothy P Mcdonald

Other

Keith Mcgee

Props

Larry Mckinney

Wrangler

Larry Mckinney

Stunts

Alvin Mears

Animal Trainer

Matt Medina

Other

Leonor Mendoza

Song

Lydia Mendoza

Song

Alan Miller

Other

Michael Miller

Adr

Darwin Mitchell

Stunts

Darwin Mitchell

Wrangler

Charlie Montoya

On-Set Dresser

Tom Moore

Other

Leslie Morales

Set Decorator

Michelene Mundo

Production Assistant

Cory Murchy

Stand-In

Ty Murray

Stunts

Alan Nelson

Grip

Lou Nelson

Other

Teresa Neptune

Local Casting

Kirk Newren

Props

Jim Nickerson

Stunts

Dan Nordquist

Grip

Patricia Norris

Costume Designer

Patricia Norris

Production Designer

David Nute

Props

Chemen Ochoa

Assistant Director

Jesus M Ornelas

Production

Randy Ortega

Other

Ray Ortega

Other

Maurice Palinski

Set Costumer

Clive Pendry

Adr Mixer

Scott A Perez

Stunts

Gary Petersen

Props

Aron Peterson

Other

Becki Ponting

Assistant Sound Editor

Don Pope

Special Thanks To

Pauline Pope

Song

Trixie Pope

Special Thanks To

Will Power

Driver

Chris I Quintana

Driver

Leon Rausch

Song Performer

Billy Ray

Driver

Paul Ray

Driver

Michael Redfern

Assistant Sound Editor

Patrick Reynolds

Driver

S Mark Rich

On-Set Dresser

Brian Richards

Music

Bill Rogers

Security

Chris Rogers

Consultant

Jake Rogers

Security

Jesse Romero

Driver

Michael Runyward

Stunts

Film Details

Also Known As
Hi-Lo Country
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
Gramercy Pictures
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Articles

Lane Smith (1936-2005)


Lane Smith, a veteran character actor of stage, screen and television, and who was best known to modern viewers as Perry White on Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, died on June 13 at his Los Angeles home of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 69.

Born in Memphis, Tennessee on April 29, 1936, Smith had a desire to act from a very young age. After a brief stint in the Army, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio and made his debut on off-Broadway debut in 1959. For the next 20 years, Smith was a staple of the New York stage before sinking his teeth into television: Kojak, The Rockford Files, Dallas; and small parts in big films: Rooster Cogburn (1975), Network (1976).

In 1978, he moved to Los Angeles to focus on better film roles, and his toothy grin and southern drawl found him a niche in backwoods dramas: Resurrection (1980), Honeysuckle Rose (1980); and a prominent role as the feisty Mayor in the dated Cold War political yarn Red Dawn (1984).

Smith returned to New York in 1984 and scored a hit on Broadway when he received a starring role in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross and earned a drama desk award in the process. His breakthrough role for many critics and colleagues was his powerful turn as Richard Nixon in The Final Days (1989); a docudrama based on the book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. He earned a Golden Globe nomination for his spot-on portrayal of the fallen President, and his career picked up from there as parts in prominent Hollywood films came his way: Air America (1990), My Cousin Vinny, The Mighty Ducks (both 1992), and the Pauly Shore comedy Son in Law (1993).

For all his dependable performances over the years, Smith wasn't a familiar presence to millions of viewers until he landed the plump role of Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet in Superman: Lois and Clark which co-starred Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher (1993-1997). After that run, he gave a scorching performance as Reverend Jeremiah Brown in the teleplay Inherit the Wind (1999); and he appeared last in the miniseries Out of Order (2003). He is survived by his wife Debbie; and son, Rob.

by Michael T. Toole
Lane Smith (1936-2005)

Lane Smith (1936-2005)

Lane Smith, a veteran character actor of stage, screen and television, and who was best known to modern viewers as Perry White on Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, died on June 13 at his Los Angeles home of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 69. Born in Memphis, Tennessee on April 29, 1936, Smith had a desire to act from a very young age. After a brief stint in the Army, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio and made his debut on off-Broadway debut in 1959. For the next 20 years, Smith was a staple of the New York stage before sinking his teeth into television: Kojak, The Rockford Files, Dallas; and small parts in big films: Rooster Cogburn (1975), Network (1976). In 1978, he moved to Los Angeles to focus on better film roles, and his toothy grin and southern drawl found him a niche in backwoods dramas: Resurrection (1980), Honeysuckle Rose (1980); and a prominent role as the feisty Mayor in the dated Cold War political yarn Red Dawn (1984). Smith returned to New York in 1984 and scored a hit on Broadway when he received a starring role in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross and earned a drama desk award in the process. His breakthrough role for many critics and colleagues was his powerful turn as Richard Nixon in The Final Days (1989); a docudrama based on the book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. He earned a Golden Globe nomination for his spot-on portrayal of the fallen President, and his career picked up from there as parts in prominent Hollywood films came his way: Air America (1990), My Cousin Vinny, The Mighty Ducks (both 1992), and the Pauly Shore comedy Son in Law (1993). For all his dependable performances over the years, Smith wasn't a familiar presence to millions of viewers until he landed the plump role of Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet in Superman: Lois and Clark which co-starred Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher (1993-1997). After that run, he gave a scorching performance as Reverend Jeremiah Brown in the teleplay Inherit the Wind (1999); and he appeared last in the miniseries Out of Order (2003). He is survived by his wife Debbie; and son, Rob. by Michael T. Toole

TCM Remembers - Katy Jurado


KATY JURADO, 1924 - 2002

Katy Jurado, an Oscar nominee and major actress in Westerns, died July 5th at the age of 78. She was born in Guadalajara, Mexico on January 16th 1924 as Maria Cristina Estella Marcela Jurado Garcia, daughter of a cattle rancher and an opera singer. Jurado started to appear in Mexican films in 1943. After 15 films in her native country, director Budd Boetticher saw Jurado attending a bullfight (Jurado wrote about the subject for Mexican newspapers) and cast her in his Bullfighter and the Lady (1952), her Hollywood debut. For much of her career Jurado alternated between the two film industries. In the US, she was memorable for the sensual energy she brought to roles in High Noon (1952), One-Eyed Jacks (1961) which was directed by Marlon Brando, Sam Peckinpah's Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973) and John Huston's Under the Volcano (1984). She was nominated for an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress for Broken Lance (1954). Jurado's Mexican films were in a broader range of genres and included Luis Bunuel's El Bruto (1952), Ismael Rodriguez's We the Poor and Miguel Littin's The Widow Montiel (1979). She won three Ariel Awards (Mexican equivalent to the Oscars) and one special award. She was married to Ernest Borgnine from the end of 1959 to summer 1963. One of her final films was The Hi-Lo Country (1998), a contemporary Western directed by Stephen Frears and co-starring Woody Harrelson, Billy Crudup and Penelope Cruz.

by Lang Thompson

DOLORES GRAY, 1924 - 2002

Broadway and nightclub star Dolores Gray died June 26th at the age of 78. Her movie career was brief but consisted of high-profile MGM musicals which guaranteed her a place in film history. Gray was born in Chicago on June 7th, 1924 (and where, according to a common story, she was accidentally shot by a gangster as a child and had a bullet in her lung her entire life). As a teenager she began singing in California until Rudy Vallee featured her on his radio show. Gray moved to Broadway in 1944 and then to the London stage in 1947, solidifying her reputation as a singer/actress while constantly giving the gossip columnists plenty to write about. She had two small singing roles in Lady for a Night (1941) and Mr. Skeffington (1944) but didn't really light up the big screen until It's Always Fair Weather (1955) even though Gray reportedly didn't much care for the role. Her rendition of "Thanks a Lot, But No Thanks," which has her gunning down a slew of male dancers on-stage and kicking them through trap doors, is a genuine showstopper. Three more unforgettable musical roles quickly followed: Kismet (1955), The Opposite Sex (1956, which Gray turned down Funny Face to do) and Designing Women (1957). That was it for Gray's film career. She kept busy with TV appearances (mostly singing though she did one 1988 episode of the cult show Dr. Who) and a busy recording and nightclub schedule. In 1987, she appeared in a British production of Follies at Stephen Sondheim's request.

by Lang Thompson

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

TCM Remembers - Katy Jurado

KATY JURADO, 1924 - 2002 Katy Jurado, an Oscar nominee and major actress in Westerns, died July 5th at the age of 78. She was born in Guadalajara, Mexico on January 16th 1924 as Maria Cristina Estella Marcela Jurado Garcia, daughter of a cattle rancher and an opera singer. Jurado started to appear in Mexican films in 1943. After 15 films in her native country, director Budd Boetticher saw Jurado attending a bullfight (Jurado wrote about the subject for Mexican newspapers) and cast her in his Bullfighter and the Lady (1952), her Hollywood debut. For much of her career Jurado alternated between the two film industries. In the US, she was memorable for the sensual energy she brought to roles in High Noon (1952), One-Eyed Jacks (1961) which was directed by Marlon Brando, Sam Peckinpah's Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973) and John Huston's Under the Volcano (1984). She was nominated for an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress for Broken Lance (1954). Jurado's Mexican films were in a broader range of genres and included Luis Bunuel's El Bruto (1952), Ismael Rodriguez's We the Poor and Miguel Littin's The Widow Montiel (1979). She won three Ariel Awards (Mexican equivalent to the Oscars) and one special award. She was married to Ernest Borgnine from the end of 1959 to summer 1963. One of her final films was The Hi-Lo Country (1998), a contemporary Western directed by Stephen Frears and co-starring Woody Harrelson, Billy Crudup and Penelope Cruz. by Lang Thompson DOLORES GRAY, 1924 - 2002 Broadway and nightclub star Dolores Gray died June 26th at the age of 78. Her movie career was brief but consisted of high-profile MGM musicals which guaranteed her a place in film history. Gray was born in Chicago on June 7th, 1924 (and where, according to a common story, she was accidentally shot by a gangster as a child and had a bullet in her lung her entire life). As a teenager she began singing in California until Rudy Vallee featured her on his radio show. Gray moved to Broadway in 1944 and then to the London stage in 1947, solidifying her reputation as a singer/actress while constantly giving the gossip columnists plenty to write about. She had two small singing roles in Lady for a Night (1941) and Mr. Skeffington (1944) but didn't really light up the big screen until It's Always Fair Weather (1955) even though Gray reportedly didn't much care for the role. Her rendition of "Thanks a Lot, But No Thanks," which has her gunning down a slew of male dancers on-stage and kicking them through trap doors, is a genuine showstopper. Three more unforgettable musical roles quickly followed: Kismet (1955), The Opposite Sex (1956, which Gray turned down Funny Face to do) and Designing Women (1957). That was it for Gray's film career. She kept busy with TV appearances (mostly singing though she did one 1988 episode of the cult show Dr. Who) and a busy recording and nightclub schedule. In 1987, she appeared in a British production of Follies at Stephen Sondheim's request. by Lang Thompson ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the Silver Bear for Best Director at the 1999 Berlin Film Festival.

Expanded Release in United States January 22, 1999

Limited Release in United States January 15, 1999

Released in United States April 1999

Released in United States February 1999

Released in United States on Video June 29, 1999

Released in United States Winter December 30, 1998

Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (in competition) February 10-21, 1999.

Shown at Paris Film Festival (closing night) April 6-13, 1999.

Max Evans' novel was originally published in 1961 and was once in development with director Sam Peckinpah.

Began shooting September 22, 1997.

Completed shooting December 4, 1997.

Film dedicated to Lindsay Anderson (1923-1994) & Maurice Hatton (1938-1997).

Limited Release in United States January 15, 1999

Expanded Release in United States January 22, 1999

Released in United States February 1999 (Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (in competition) February 10-21, 1999.)

Released in United States April 1999 (Shown at Paris Film Festival (closing night) April 6-13, 1999.)

Released in United States on Video June 29, 1999

Released in United States Winter December 30, 1998