Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas


2h 1998

Brief Synopsis

Journalist Raoul Duke and his lawyer Dr Gonzo drive from LA to Las Vegas on a drugs binge. They nominally cover news stories, including a convention on drug abuse, but also sink deeper into a frightening psychedelic otherworld. As Vietnam, Altamont and the Tate killings impinge from the world of TV

Film Details

Also Known As
Vegas parano
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Synopsis

Journalist Raoul Duke and his lawyer Dr Gonzo drive from LA to Las Vegas on a drugs binge. They nominally cover news stories, including a convention on drug abuse, but also sink deeper into a frightening psychedelic otherworld. As Vietnam, Altamont and the Tate killings impinge from the world of TV news, Duke and Gonzo see casinos, reptiles and the Amercian dream.

Crew

Doug Aarniokoski

Production

Andrea Adams

Visual Effects

Molly Allen

Location Manager

Chris Allies

Titles

Sam Andrew

Song

Paul Anka

Song

Carmine Appice

Song Performer

Carmine Appice

Song

Steve Arnold

Art Director

Burt Bacharach

Song

Jeff Beck

Song Performer

Jeff Beck

Song

Ingrid Behrens

Production

Elmer Bernstein

Song Performer

Elmer Bernstein

Song

Big Brother And The Holding Company

Song Performer

Tim Bogert

Song

Tim Bogert

Song Performer

Mick Boggis

Other

Rob Bottin

Makeup

Rob Bottin

Visual Effects

Michael Brewer

Song

Stephen W Bridgewater

Adr

Harold Bronson

Executive Producer

Paul Carr

Adr

Patrick Cassavetti

Producer

Danny Castle

Other

Melissa Chang

Puppeteer

Martin Charles

Graphic Designer

Lynn Christopher

Set Designer

Eden Clark-coblenz

Costume Supervisor

Michael Colton

Puppeteer

Perry Como

Song Performer

Bridget M. Cook

Hair

Michael Cooper

Effects Coordinator

Ray Cooper

Music

Rupert Coulson

Sound Engineer

Alex Cox

Screenplay

Elizabeth Cox

Song

Steve Cropper

Song

Michael Cudahy

Song

Nicholas Cudahy

Song

Steve Cutmore

Visual Effects

Hal David

Song

Tod Davies

Screenplay

Lynn Del Kail

Hair Stylist

Ditch Doy

Visual Effects

Al Dubin

Song

Donald Dunn

Song

Bob Dylan

Song

Bob Dylan

Song Performer

Seth Edelstein

Assistant Director

Mercer Ellington

Song

Ray Evans

Song

Fernando Favila

Visual Effects

Christina Fong

Assistant Director

Richard Foos

Executive Producer

Amanda Forman

Puppeteer

Julie Forman

Puppeteer

Joann Fregalette Jansen

Choreographer

Steve Galich

Special Effects Coordinator

Joe Gallagher

Adr Editor

Gary Gero

Animal Trainer

Terry Gilliam

Screenplay

Chris Gorak

Art Director

Patricia Gordon

Script Supervisor

Graham Gouldman

Song

Robert Goulet

Song Performer

Tony Grisoni

Screenplay

Nancy Haigh

Set Decorator

Oscar Hammerstein Ii

Song

Motoyoshi Hata

Puppeteer

Chris Heeter

Puppeteer

Duane Hitchings

Song

Kent Houston

Visual Effects Supervisor

Mark Indig

Unit Production Manager

Al Jackson

Song

Mick Jagger

Song

Jefferson Airplane

Song Performer

John Jergens

Associate Producer

Booker T. Jones

Song

Sonia Jones

Music

Tom Jones

Song Performer

Bert Kaempfert

Song

Lawrence Karman

Camera Operator

Katie Kissoon

Music

Tani Kunitake

Illustrator

Kevin Lane

Music Editor

Sydney Lee

Song

John Lennon

Song

Dominic Lester

Rerecording

Joe Levine

Song

Jay Livingston

Song

Bruce Logan

Second Unit Director

Pearl A Lucero

Production Coordinator

Michael Marcus

Graphic Designer

Jamie Marshall

Assistant Director

Karon May

Script Supervisor

Paul Mccartney

Song

Alex Mcdowell

Production Designer

Stephen Mclaughlin

Music

Jay Meagher

Sound Mixer

Gino Mescoli

Song

Gordon Mills

Song

Matthew W. Mungle

Makeup

Laila Nabulsi

Producer

Lisa Nelson

Puppeteer

Stephen Nemeth

Producer

Randy Newman

Song

Wayne Newton

Song Performer

Cheryl Nick

Makeup Artist

Vince Niebla

Puppeteer

Robin O'donoghue

Rerecording

Tim Olive

Visual Effects

Noon Orsatti

Stunt Coordinator

Alan Paley

Dialogue Editor

Vito Pallavicini

Song

Philip A Patterson

Assistant Director

Nicola Pecorini

Steadicam Operator

Nicola Pecorini

Director Of Photography

Peter Pennell

Sound Editor

Frank Perl

Camera Operator

Arthur Pimentel

Puppeteer

Doc Pomus

Song

Ellen Powell

Hair Stylist

Chet Powers

Song

Lee Reed

Song

Arthur Resnick

Song

Debbie Reynolds

Song Performer

Keith Richard

Song

Bob Risk

Foley Editor

Richard Rodgers

Song

Susi Roper

Visual Effects

Cindy Rose

Hair Stylist

Elliot Lewis Rosenblatt

Coproducer

Elliot Lewis Rosenblatt

Unit Production Manager

Bradley Ross

Puppeteer

Sam Sainz

Puppeteer

Terry Sandin

Puppeteer

Lia Sargent

Adr

Bob Scribner

Makeup Artist

Dawn Severdia

Effects Coordinator

Russell Shinkle

Digital Effects Supervisor

Tom Shipley

Song

Mort Shuman

Song

Margery Simkin

Casting

Frank Sinatra

Song Performer

Charles Singleton

Song

Darcy Slick

Song

Grace Slick

Song

David Smith

Other

Michael Prestwood Smith

Adr

Eddie Snyder

Song

Michael Solinger

Post-Production Supervisor

Buffalo Sprringfield

Song Performer

Ray Svedin

Special Effects Supervisor

John Swinnerton

Visual Effects

Hunter S Thompson

Consultant

Hunter S Thompson

Book As Source Material

Willie Mae Thornton

Song

Danny Valencia

Hair Stylist

Kitty Veevers

Visual Effects

Brenda Wachel

Script Supervisor

Patrick Wachsberger

Executive Producer

Lesley Walker

Editor

Jacky Ward

Wardrobe

Harry Warren

Song

Jim Warren

Animal Trainer

David Weigand

Puppeteer

Julie Weiss

Wardrobe

J R Westen

Adr

Pete Williams

Visual Effects

Trevor Withers

Other

The Yardbirds

Song Performer

Patty York

Makeup Artist

Neil Young

Song

Laurie Zwerek

Production Supervisor

Film Details

Also Known As
Vegas parano
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Articles

Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)


Elmer Bernstein, the film composer who created unforgettable music for such classics as The Magnificent Seven, To Kill a Mockingbird, and won his only Academy Award for Thoroughly Modern Millie, died of natural causes at his Ojai, California home on August 17. He was 82.

Elmer Bernstein, who was not related to Leonard Bernstein, was born on August 4, 1922, in New York City. He displayed a talent in music at a very young age, and was given a scholarship to study piano at Juilliard when he was only 12. He entered New York University in 1939, where he majored in music education. After graduating in 1942, he joined the Army Air Corps, where he remained throughout World War II, mostly working on scores for propaganda films. It was around this time he became interested in film scoring when he went to see William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), a film whose score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, a man Bernstein idolized as the ideal film composer.

Bernstein, who originally intended to be a concert pianist and gave several performances in New York after being discharged from military service, decided to relocate to Hollywood in 1950. He did his first score for the football film Saturday's Hero (1950), and then proved his worth with his trenchant, moody music for the Joan Crawford vehicle Sudden Fear (1952). Rumors of his "communist" leanings came to surface at this time, and, feeling the effects of the blacklist, he found himself scoring such cheesy fare as Robot Monster; Cat Women of the Moon (both 1953); and Miss Robin Caruso (1954).

Despite his politics, Otto Preminger hired him to do the music for The Man With the Golden Arm, (1955) in which Frank Sinatra played a heroin-addicted jazz musician. Fittingly, Bernstein used some memorable jazz motifs for the film and his fine scoring put him back on the map. It prompted the attention of Cecil B. De Mille, who had Bernstein replace the ailing Victor Young on The Ten Commandments (1956). His thundering, heavily orchestrated score perfectly suite the bombastic epic, and he promptly earned his first Oscar® nod for music.

After The Ten Commandments (1956), Bernstein continued to distinguish himself in a row of fine films: The Rainmaker (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Some Came Running (1958), The Magnificent Seven (a most memorable galloping march, 1960); To Kill a Mockingbird (unique in its use of single piano notes and haunting use of a flute, 1962); Hud (1963); earned a deserved Academy Award for the delightful, "flapper" music for the Julie Andrews period comedy Thoroughly Modern Mille (1967), and True Grit (1969).

His career faltered by the '80s though, as he did some routine Bill Murray comedies: Meatballs (1980) and Stripes (1981). But then director John Landis had Bernstein write the sumptuous score for his comedy Trading Places (1983), and Bernstein soon found himself back in the game. He then graced the silver screen for a few more years composing some terrific pieces for such popular commercial hits as My Left Foot (1989), A River Runs Through It (1992) and The Age of Innocence (1993). Far From Heaven, his final feature film score, received an Oscar® nomination for Best Score in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Eve; sons Peter and Gregory; daughters Emilie and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)

Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)

Elmer Bernstein, the film composer who created unforgettable music for such classics as The Magnificent Seven, To Kill a Mockingbird, and won his only Academy Award for Thoroughly Modern Millie, died of natural causes at his Ojai, California home on August 17. He was 82. Elmer Bernstein, who was not related to Leonard Bernstein, was born on August 4, 1922, in New York City. He displayed a talent in music at a very young age, and was given a scholarship to study piano at Juilliard when he was only 12. He entered New York University in 1939, where he majored in music education. After graduating in 1942, he joined the Army Air Corps, where he remained throughout World War II, mostly working on scores for propaganda films. It was around this time he became interested in film scoring when he went to see William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), a film whose score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, a man Bernstein idolized as the ideal film composer. Bernstein, who originally intended to be a concert pianist and gave several performances in New York after being discharged from military service, decided to relocate to Hollywood in 1950. He did his first score for the football film Saturday's Hero (1950), and then proved his worth with his trenchant, moody music for the Joan Crawford vehicle Sudden Fear (1952). Rumors of his "communist" leanings came to surface at this time, and, feeling the effects of the blacklist, he found himself scoring such cheesy fare as Robot Monster; Cat Women of the Moon (both 1953); and Miss Robin Caruso (1954). Despite his politics, Otto Preminger hired him to do the music for The Man With the Golden Arm, (1955) in which Frank Sinatra played a heroin-addicted jazz musician. Fittingly, Bernstein used some memorable jazz motifs for the film and his fine scoring put him back on the map. It prompted the attention of Cecil B. De Mille, who had Bernstein replace the ailing Victor Young on The Ten Commandments (1956). His thundering, heavily orchestrated score perfectly suite the bombastic epic, and he promptly earned his first Oscar® nod for music. After The Ten Commandments (1956), Bernstein continued to distinguish himself in a row of fine films: The Rainmaker (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Some Came Running (1958), The Magnificent Seven (a most memorable galloping march, 1960); To Kill a Mockingbird (unique in its use of single piano notes and haunting use of a flute, 1962); Hud (1963); earned a deserved Academy Award for the delightful, "flapper" music for the Julie Andrews period comedy Thoroughly Modern Mille (1967), and True Grit (1969). His career faltered by the '80s though, as he did some routine Bill Murray comedies: Meatballs (1980) and Stripes (1981). But then director John Landis had Bernstein write the sumptuous score for his comedy Trading Places (1983), and Bernstein soon found himself back in the game. He then graced the silver screen for a few more years composing some terrific pieces for such popular commercial hits as My Left Foot (1989), A River Runs Through It (1992) and The Age of Innocence (1993). Far From Heaven, his final feature film score, received an Oscar® nomination for Best Score in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Eve; sons Peter and Gregory; daughters Emilie and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003


Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive.

Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979).

Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's (1991) delivering a moving performance as a homeless cabaret singer with AIDS.

He scored his biggest coup when he was cast the same year in the hit sitcom Evening Shade (1991-1994) as Herman Stiles, the wimpy assistant to Reynolds, who played a pro football player turned coach. He won an Emmy award in 1992 for that role and scored two more nominations by the end of the series run. Jeter would also get some good supporting parts in many films throughout the decade: Sister Act 2 (1993), a fun comic role as Whoopi Goldberg's sidekick Father Ignatius; Mouse Hunt (1997); The Green Mile (1999), his best film role as Eduard Delacroix, a condemned murderer who befriends a cellblock mouse; Jurassic Park III (2001); and Welcome to Collinwood (2002).

At the time of his death, Jeter was appearing on the classic PBS children's series Sesame Street as the lovable but bumbling Mr. Noodle; and had been filming Robert Zemekis' Christmas movie The Polar Express starring Tom Hanks. Production was halted on Monday in observance of Jeter's death. He is survived by his life partner, Sean Blue, his parents, Dr. William and Virginia Jeter; a brother, William; and four sisters, Virginia Anne Barham, Emily Jeter, Amanda Parsons and Laurie Wicker.

by Michael T. Toole

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive. Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979). Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer May 22, 1998

Released in United States on Video November 17, 1998

Released in United States November 1998

Released in United States December 1998

Released in United States November 2005

Shown at London Film Festival November 5-19, 1998.

Shown at Havana Film Festival December 1-11, 1998.

Based upon Hunter S. Thompson's book "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" (1971). As a reporter for Rolling Stone magazine, Thompson covered the narcotics enforcement convention in Las Vegas, while under the influence himself.

Project was once in development at Ridley Scott's Percy Main Productions.

Director Alex Cox, who wrote a draft of the script with Tod Davies, left the project in early April 1997 due to creative differences.

Completed shooting October 22, 1997.

Began shooting August 3, 1997.

Johnny Depp receives $500,000 plus a gross percentage for this project.

Released in United States Summer May 22, 1998

Released in United States on Video November 17, 1998

Released in United States November 1998 (Shown at London Film Festival November 5-19, 1998.)

Released in United States December 1998 (Shown at Havana Film Festival December 1-11, 1998.)

Released in United States November 2005 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles International Film Festival (Tribute) November 3-13, 2005.)