Digging to China


1h 38m 1997

Brief Synopsis

A 10-year-old girl, staying in a motel with her mother and older sister, befriends a mentally retarded man.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
LEGACY/LEGACY RELEASING
Location
North Carolina, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Synopsis

A 10-year-old girl, staying in a motel with her mother and older sister, befriends a mentally retarded man.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
LEGACY/LEGACY RELEASING
Location
North Carolina, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Articles

Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)


Elmer Bernstein, the film composer who created unforgettable music for such classics as The Magnificent Seven, To Kill a Mockingbird, and won his only Academy Award for Thoroughly Modern Millie, died of natural causes at his Ojai, California home on August 17. He was 82.

Elmer Bernstein, who was not related to Leonard Bernstein, was born on August 4, 1922, in New York City. He displayed a talent in music at a very young age, and was given a scholarship to study piano at Juilliard when he was only 12. He entered New York University in 1939, where he majored in music education. After graduating in 1942, he joined the Army Air Corps, where he remained throughout World War II, mostly working on scores for propaganda films. It was around this time he became interested in film scoring when he went to see William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), a film whose score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, a man Bernstein idolized as the ideal film composer.

Bernstein, who originally intended to be a concert pianist and gave several performances in New York after being discharged from military service, decided to relocate to Hollywood in 1950. He did his first score for the football film Saturday's Hero (1950), and then proved his worth with his trenchant, moody music for the Joan Crawford vehicle Sudden Fear (1952). Rumors of his "communist" leanings came to surface at this time, and, feeling the effects of the blacklist, he found himself scoring such cheesy fare as Robot Monster; Cat Women of the Moon (both 1953); and Miss Robin Caruso (1954).

Despite his politics, Otto Preminger hired him to do the music for The Man With the Golden Arm, (1955) in which Frank Sinatra played a heroin-addicted jazz musician. Fittingly, Bernstein used some memorable jazz motifs for the film and his fine scoring put him back on the map. It prompted the attention of Cecil B. De Mille, who had Bernstein replace the ailing Victor Young on The Ten Commandments (1956). His thundering, heavily orchestrated score perfectly suite the bombastic epic, and he promptly earned his first Oscar® nod for music.

After The Ten Commandments (1956), Bernstein continued to distinguish himself in a row of fine films: The Rainmaker (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Some Came Running (1958), The Magnificent Seven (a most memorable galloping march, 1960); To Kill a Mockingbird (unique in its use of single piano notes and haunting use of a flute, 1962); Hud (1963); earned a deserved Academy Award for the delightful, "flapper" music for the Julie Andrews period comedy Thoroughly Modern Mille (1967), and True Grit (1969).

His career faltered by the '80s though, as he did some routine Bill Murray comedies: Meatballs (1980) and Stripes (1981). But then director John Landis had Bernstein write the sumptuous score for his comedy Trading Places (1983), and Bernstein soon found himself back in the game. He then graced the silver screen for a few more years composing some terrific pieces for such popular commercial hits as My Left Foot (1989), A River Runs Through It (1992) and The Age of Innocence (1993). Far From Heaven, his final feature film score, received an Oscar® nomination for Best Score in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Eve; sons Peter and Gregory; daughters Emilie and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)

Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)

Elmer Bernstein, the film composer who created unforgettable music for such classics as The Magnificent Seven, To Kill a Mockingbird, and won his only Academy Award for Thoroughly Modern Millie, died of natural causes at his Ojai, California home on August 17. He was 82. Elmer Bernstein, who was not related to Leonard Bernstein, was born on August 4, 1922, in New York City. He displayed a talent in music at a very young age, and was given a scholarship to study piano at Juilliard when he was only 12. He entered New York University in 1939, where he majored in music education. After graduating in 1942, he joined the Army Air Corps, where he remained throughout World War II, mostly working on scores for propaganda films. It was around this time he became interested in film scoring when he went to see William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), a film whose score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, a man Bernstein idolized as the ideal film composer. Bernstein, who originally intended to be a concert pianist and gave several performances in New York after being discharged from military service, decided to relocate to Hollywood in 1950. He did his first score for the football film Saturday's Hero (1950), and then proved his worth with his trenchant, moody music for the Joan Crawford vehicle Sudden Fear (1952). Rumors of his "communist" leanings came to surface at this time, and, feeling the effects of the blacklist, he found himself scoring such cheesy fare as Robot Monster; Cat Women of the Moon (both 1953); and Miss Robin Caruso (1954). Despite his politics, Otto Preminger hired him to do the music for The Man With the Golden Arm, (1955) in which Frank Sinatra played a heroin-addicted jazz musician. Fittingly, Bernstein used some memorable jazz motifs for the film and his fine scoring put him back on the map. It prompted the attention of Cecil B. De Mille, who had Bernstein replace the ailing Victor Young on The Ten Commandments (1956). His thundering, heavily orchestrated score perfectly suite the bombastic epic, and he promptly earned his first Oscar® nod for music. After The Ten Commandments (1956), Bernstein continued to distinguish himself in a row of fine films: The Rainmaker (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Some Came Running (1958), The Magnificent Seven (a most memorable galloping march, 1960); To Kill a Mockingbird (unique in its use of single piano notes and haunting use of a flute, 1962); Hud (1963); earned a deserved Academy Award for the delightful, "flapper" music for the Julie Andrews period comedy Thoroughly Modern Mille (1967), and True Grit (1969). His career faltered by the '80s though, as he did some routine Bill Murray comedies: Meatballs (1980) and Stripes (1981). But then director John Landis had Bernstein write the sumptuous score for his comedy Trading Places (1983), and Bernstein soon found himself back in the game. He then graced the silver screen for a few more years composing some terrific pieces for such popular commercial hits as My Left Foot (1989), A River Runs Through It (1992) and The Age of Innocence (1993). Far From Heaven, his final feature film score, received an Oscar® nomination for Best Score in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Eve; sons Peter and Gregory; daughters Emilie and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of Bronze Griffin for best actor (Kevin Bacon) at the 1997 Giffoni Film Festival.

Winner of First Prize from the Children's Jury at the 1998 Chicago International Children's Film Festival.

Limited Release in United States September 11, 1998

Released in United States 1997

Released in United States 1998

Released in United States Fall September 11, 1998

Released in United States January 1998

Released in United States July 1997

Released in United States October 1998

Released in United States on Video February 23, 1999

Released in United States September 1998

Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica, California February 27 - March 6, 1997.

Shown at Avignon/New York Film Festival in New York City (French Institute) April 24 - May 3, 1998.

Shown at Boston Film Festival September 10-20, 1998.

Shown at Chicago International Children's Film Festival October 15-25, 1998.

Shown at Denver International Film Festival (Contemproary World Cinema) October 8-15, 1998.

Shown at Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival October 26 November 15, 1998.

Shown at Giffoni International Children's Film Festival in Italy July 20-27, 1997.

Shown at Seattle International Film Festival May 21 - June 14, 1998.

Shown at St Louis International Film Festival (opening night) October 29 - November 8, 1998.

Shown at Sundance Film Festival (Premieres) in Park City, Utah January 15-25, 1998.

Geena Davis was previously attached to direct.

Feature directorial debut for Timothy Hutton.

Gallery Motion Pictures is a division of Moonstone Entertainment devoted to higher-budget projects.

Released in United States 1997 (Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica, California February 27 - March 6, 1997.)

Released in United States 1998 (Shown at Avignon/New York Film Festival in New York City (French Institute) April 24 - May 3, 1998.)

Released in United States 1998 (Shown at Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival October 26 November 15, 1998.)

Released in United States 1998 (Shown at Seattle International Film Festival May 21 - June 14, 1998.)

Began shooting September 16, 1996.

Completed shooting late October 1996.

Released in United States 1998 (Shown at St Louis International Film Festival (opening night) October 29 - November 8, 1998.)

Released in United States January 1998 (Shown at Sundance Film Festival (Premieres) in Park City, Utah January 15-25, 1998.)

Released in United States on Video February 23, 1999

Released in United States July 1997 (Shown at Giffoni International Children's Film Festival in Italy July 20-27, 1997.)

Released in United States September 1998 (Shown at Boston Film Festival September 10-20, 1998.)

Limited Release in United States September 11, 1998

Released in United States Fall September 11, 1998

Released in United States October 1998 (Shown at Chicago International Children's Film Festival October 15-25, 1998.)

Released in United States October 1998 (Shown at Denver International Film Festival (Contemproary World Cinema) October 8-15, 1998.)