Crazy in Alabama


1h 51m 1999

Brief Synopsis

It's the summer of 1965 and eccentric and glamorous Lucille is on her way to Hollywood to pursue her dreams of television stardom. With the head of her abusive husband stored safely in a tupperware container, she hits the road on a journey of self independence and becomes an unlikely catalyst for a

Film Details

Also Known As
La Tete dans le carton a chapeaux, Locos en Alabama, Tete dans le carton a chapeaux, La
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Houma, Louisiana, USA; New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 51m

Synopsis

It's the summer of 1965 and eccentric and glamorous Lucille is on her way to Hollywood to pursue her dreams of television stardom. With the head of her abusive husband stored safely in a tupperware container, she hits the road on a journey of self independence and becomes an unlikely catalyst for an unforgettable summer for her nephew Peejoe, a backewoods Alabama boy who gets a fast education in matters of personal freedom, women's rights and racial prejudice.

Crew

Nate Adams

Song Performer

Nate Adams

Song

Harold Allen

Song Performer

Harold Allen

Song

Douglas B Arnold

Sound

Shorty Ashford

Song Performer

Shorty Ashford

Song

Michael Atwell

Art Director

Carmen Baker

Assistant Sound Editor

Warren Barker

Song

Jorge L Baron

Assistant Director

Guy Norman Bee

Steadicam Operator

Dan Bentley

Assistant Property Master

Bill W Benton

Rerecording

Steve Birkett

Boom Operator

Kevin Bissada

Production Assistant

Erin Borel

Other

James Borgardt

Adr Editor

Luke Borghi

Apprentice

Alex Bradford

Song

Jim Brookshire

Sound Editor

Michael Broomberg

Foley Artist

Candice Campos

Assistant Production Coordinator

Guy Carawan

Song

Jon Carpenter

Transportation Captain

Buddy Carr

Dolly Grip

Jeff Charbonneau

Music Editor

Tim Chau

Sound Editor

Mark Childress

Screenplay

Mark Childress

Source Material (From Novel)

John Chisholm

Other

Joe Coble

Craft Service

Albert Collins

Song

Devon Curry

Adr Editor

Burt Dache

Song Performer

Xanthia Decaux

Casting Associate

Jo Doster

Location Casting

Richard Duarte

Foley Mixer

Stephanie Dupuy

Location Manager

James R. Dyer

Unit Production Manager

James R. Dyer

Executive Producer

Susan Ehrhart

Other

Joy Ellison

Dialect Coach

David Erwin

On-Set Dresser

Peter Ettinger

Assistant Editor

Rae Jean Ferreri

Song

Leigh French

Voice Casting

Sierra French-myerson

Casting Associate

Elisabeth Fry

Makeup Supervisor

Kris Fullan Martinez

Production Coordinator

Sam Gaglani

Assistant

Wilma Garscadden-gahret

Script Supervisor

Albert Gasser

Sound Editor

Lonnie Gatlin

Lighting

Gerry Goffin

Song

Linda Goldstein-knowlton

Producer

Howard Greenfield

Song

Robert Greenfield

Set Decorator

Jeffrey J. Haboush

Rerecording

Frank Hamilton

Song

Lee Hazlewood

Song

Justine Hebron

Production Coordinator

Gary Hecker

Foley Artist

Hilary Hellman

Assistant

Mo Henry

Negative Cutting

Debra Hill

Producer

Zilphia Horton

Song

Maysie Hoy

Editor

Steele Hunter

Grip

Jeff Imada

Stunt Coordinator

Doug Jackson

Sound Editor

Drake Jenevein

Assistant Sound Editor

Malle Jensen

Assistant

Nils C Jensen

Sound Editor

Audrey A Johnson

Assistant Property Master

Kent Johnson

Property Master

Robert C. Jones

Editor

Gene Kearney

Key Grip

Jack Keller

Song

Gene Kelly

Production Accountant

David Kern

Sound Editor

Carole King

Song

Carole King

Song Performer

Noelle King

Set Designer

Robert E Krattiger

Lighting Technician

J. T. Lannen

Transportation Co-Captain

Lonnie Leibowitz

Song

Little Richard

Song Performer

Little Richard

Song

Deborah Lurie

Original Music

Julio Macat

Director Of Photography

Ralph Maiers

Visual Effects Supervisor

Mindy Marin

Casting

Daniel May

Song Performer

Daniel May

Song

Graciela Maz=n

Costume Designer

Virginia Mccollam

Location Manager

Chitra F Mojtabai

Assistant Director

Cecilia Montiel

Production Designer

Jim Morris

Location Manager

Jennifer Morrison Holyfield

Costumes

Piero Mura

Sound Editor

Candace Neal

Hair Stylist

Ralph Nelson

Photography

Valli O'reilly

Makeup

Greg Orloff

Rerecording

Nic Papanickolas

Dolly Grip

George Parra

Assistant Director

Ron Peterson

Assistant Camera Operator

Steve Peterson

Assistant Camera Operator

Joe Ramsey

Special Effects Coordinator

Patricia Ramsey

Special Effects Foreman

Larold Rebhun

Music

Tiffany Reinhard

Assistant Production Accountant

Jonathan Sacks

Original Music

Pete Seeger

Song

Ashley Sibille

Production Assistant

Diane Sillan Isaacs

Producer

Nancy Sinatra

Song Performer

Mark Snow

Music

John Earl Stone

Construction Coordinator

Meir Teper

Producer

Rudolph Toombs

Song

Larry Velasco

Wardrobe Supervisor

Ken Walker

Hair Stylist

J T Watts

Song Performer

Jay Worth

Production Assistant

Gina Zappala

Assistant Editor

Film Details

Also Known As
La Tete dans le carton a chapeaux, Locos en Alabama, Tete dans le carton a chapeaux, La
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Houma, Louisiana, USA; New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 51m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger


ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Tcm Remembers - Rod Steiger

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 22, 1999

Released in United States November 1999

Released in United States on Video March 28, 2000

Released in United States September 1999

Shown at London Film Festival November 3-18, 1999.

Shown at Venice International Film Festival (in competition) September 1-11, 1999.

Feature directorial debut for actor Antonio Banderas who received the fifth annual (1999) American Latin Media Arts award, known as the ALMA, for Best Director from the National Council of La Raza.

Began shooting April 22, 1998.

Completed shooting June 27, 1998.

Green Moon Productions is Antonio Banderas' production company.

Cinemascope

Released in United States on Video March 28, 2000

Released in United States September 1999 (Shown at Venice International Film Festival (in competition) September 1-11, 1999.)

Released in United States Fall October 22, 1999

Released in United States November 1999 (Shown at London Film Festival November 3-18, 1999.)