Coming Soon


1h 31m 1999

Brief Synopsis

The trials, tribulations and sexual coming of age of three seniors at the prestigious Halton School in Manhattan as they struggle to find academic advancement and sexual fulfillment. including: Stream, a smart strawberry blonde who always falls for bad boys and social misfits; Henry Rockefeller, her

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Unapix Films
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m

Synopsis

The trials, tribulations and sexual coming of age of three seniors at the prestigious Halton School in Manhattan as they struggle to find academic advancement and sexual fulfillment. including: Stream, a smart strawberry blonde who always falls for bad boys and social misfits; Henry Rockefeller, her latest object of affection whom declares his rebellion by changing his last name to Lipschitz; and Jenny, Stream's best friend who hides her intelligence behind a mask of self-absorption and fishnet stockings.

Crew

Rachel Allen

Makeup Artist

Lorenza Arizaga

Swing Gang

Todd Armitage

Assistant Camera Operator

Thomas Augsberger

Executive Producer

Joaquin Baca-asay

Director Of Photography

Joaquin Baca-asay

Dp/Cinematographer

Joe Barnett

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Luke Bassis

Production

Denise Boquist

Other

Steven E Bram

Auditor

Avery S Brandon

Other

Germaine Brooks

Special Thanks To

Juan Bryan

Driver

Norman Buckley

Editor

Colette Burson

Screenplay

Sean J. Campbell

Assistant Editor

Amanda Carroll

Assistant Set Decorator

Jamie Cohen

Product Placement

Dave Correa

Special Thanks To

Michael Costain

Wig Supplier

Richard D Curry

Other

Robert Danes

Special Thanks To

Jimmi Davarashvili

Grip

Matteo De Cosmo

On-Set Dresser

Canada Dry

Special Thanks To

Jennifer Dubin

Set Production Assistant

Keven Duffy

Producer

Mike Dzienkiewicz

Driver

Meraby Ellis

Best Boy Grip

Matthias Emcke

Executive Producer

Kenan Erdogan

Swing Gang

Adam Escott

Assistant Director

Karen E. Etcoff

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Joe Facey

Craft Service

Donna Farrell

Other

Kimberly Faulkner

Assistant Location Manager

William Featherstone

Driver

Elizabeth Fillmore

Special Thanks To

Eileen Fisher

Special Thanks To

Beau Flynn

Producer

Mara Galus

Set Production Assistant

Cecile George

Assistant

Hildie Ginsberg

Hair Stylist

Mark Goldstein

Grip

Erin Greenwell

Apprentice

Jason Grey

Office Assistant

Barklie K Griggs

Music Supervisor

Tracey Gudwin

Assistant Camera Operator

Tracey Gudwin

Camera

Anguibe Guindo

Wrangler

Blake Hamilton

Assistant

Thomas Hamilton

Gaffer

Monisha Harrell

Office Assistant

Andy Henbest

Other

Cara Hill

Script Supervisor

Curtis Hines

Boom Operator

Bryan Hodge

Dresser

Ryan Hogan

Props

Haroun Ibn Mock

Other

Eddie Joe

Other

Paul Johnson

Security

Lana Jones

Production

Michael Jortner

Assistant Director

Diedre Kane

Special Thanks To

Giles Khan

Wrangler

Tom Kincaid

Photography

Elizabeth Klenk

Location Assistant

Jill Kliber

Assistant Costume Designer

Kevin Knicely

Hair

Linda Krantz

Property Master

Carmel Kubasik

Casting Associate

Nicki Ledermann

Hairdresser

Jenni Lee

Wardrobe Supervisor

Tom Legoff

Photography

Greg Leshe

Special Thanks To

Rachael Levine

Assistant Camera Operator

Alexander Maceev

Storyboard Artist

Steve Madden

Special Thanks To

Claire Mark

On-Set Dresser

Judy Meiselman

Special Thanks To

Nicole Miller

Special Thanks To

Gary Mirabelle

Special Thanks To

Douglas Moe

Assistant Production Coordinator

Michael Moffa

Set Production Assistant

Stephen Molinaro

Location Assistant

Melody Nichols

Extras Casting Assistant

Juan Ogando

Graphics

Susan Ogu

Set Decorator

Robyn Owen

Casting Assistant

Kyra Panchenko

Hair Stylist

Rita Parikh

Production Coordinator

Arik Penchina

Set Production Assistant

Sally Penn

Special Thanks To

Simon Pierce

Special Thanks To

Jessica Piscitelli

Set Production Assistant

Kerrie R Plant

Makeup Artist

Kevin Posey

Makeup Artist

Lisa Pressman

Special Thanks To

Tim Rehwaldt

Construction Coordinator

Todd Renschler

Props

Tammie Rhee

Production

Kate Robin

Screenplay

Victoria Robinson

Assistant Director

Ken Rosenberg

Music

Scott Rosenstein

Set Production Assistant

Michael Sadov

Key Grip

Damon Salerno

Dolly Grip

Jordan Schlanger

Special Thanks To

Heidrun Schlossmacher

Production

Duke Scoppa

Swing Gang

Lesley Scott

Set Costumer

Tengo Sepiashvili

Grip

Marcia Shulman

Casting

Stefan Simchowitz

Producer

Dina Sliwiak

Hair Stylist

Melissa Soltis

Camera

Melissa Soltis

Assistant Camera Operator

Sheila Stenber

Special Thanks To

Carrie Stewart

Art Department Coordinator

Jill Stuart

Special Thanks To

Anne Stuhler

Production Designer

Kenneth D Sugerman

Special Thanks To

Robin Sweet

Production Manager

Nathan Thoma

Other

Seamus Tierney

Other

Melissa Toth

Costume Designer

Alfonso Trinidad

Set Production Assistant

Bill Tripician

Extras Casting Assistant

Maria Gracia Turgeon

Special Thanks To

Decay Urban

Special Thanks To

Gayle Vangrofsky

Location Manager

Hector Vasquez

Other

E. Bennett Walsh

Coproducer

Allison Wellins

Accounting Assistant

Erica Westheimer

Wardrobe Assistant

Mark White

Art Director

Vic Whitney

Carpenter

Steve Wiley

Special Thanks To

Jason Williams

Music

Graham Willoughby

Best Boy

Alex Wolfe

Sound Mixer

Gerard Yosca

Special Thanks To

Ronnie Zizmor

Set Production Assistant

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Unapix Films
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m

Articles

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)


Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62.

Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe.

It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art.

Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent.

After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray.

His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month.

Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing.

by Michael T. Toole
Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62. Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe. It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art. Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent. After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray. His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month. Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring May 12, 2000

Released in United States June 16, 2000

Released in United States on Video June 20, 2000

Released in United States 1999

Released in United States April 1999

Released in United States June 1999

Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (American Independent Cinema) May 13 - June 6, 1999.

Shown at Los Angeles Independent Film Festival April 15-20, 1999.

Shown at Nantucket Film Festival (Closing Night) June 14-19, 1999.

Feature directorial debut for Colette Burson.

Straight-to-video release.

Began shooting April 27, 1998.

Completed shooting May 31, 1998.

Released in United States Spring May 12, 2000

Released in United States June 16, 2000 (Laemmle's Sunset 5; Los Angeles)

Released in United States on Video June 20, 2000

Released in United States 1999 (World premiere at the 1999 Los Angeles Independent Film Festival.)

Released in United States 1999 (Shown at Seattle International Film Festival (American Independent Cinema) May 13 - June 6, 1999.)

Released in United States April 1999 (Shown at Los Angeles Independent Film Festival April 15-20, 1999.)

Released in United States June 1999 (Shown at Nantucket Film Festival (Closing Night) June 14-19, 1999.)