Broken Vessels


1h 30m 1998

Brief Synopsis

The story of two emergency medical technicians, Tom, an earnest and seemingly innocent young man from Pennsylvania who has moved to Los Angeles where he lands this intense and challenging job; and Jimmy, his unflappable and reliable veteran partner, who is seriously reckless and desperate. For both

Film Details

Also Known As
Derapages
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Production Company
Ben Liou
Distribution Company
Unapix Films/Zeitgeist Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

The story of two emergency medical technicians, Tom, an earnest and seemingly innocent young man from Pennsylvania who has moved to Los Angeles where he lands this intense and challenging job; and Jimmy, his unflappable and reliable veteran partner, who is seriously reckless and desperate. For both men, the thrill in "life-saving" is surpassed only by their thirst for a heroin-induced delirium. Their journey turns into an experiment into pushing the limits and it quickly evolves into a journey through the drug underworld as they careen off the edge and out of control.

Crew

David Baer

Coproducer

David Baer

Screenplay

Tony Barraza

Visual Effects

Maggie Bialack

Accountant

Martin Blasick

Music

Paul Bochary

Other

John Bulbow

Other

Antonio Calvache

Director Of Photography

Antonio Calvache

Other

Antonio Calvache

Camera Operator

Anthony Carregal

Assistant Director

Jeffrey Castel De Oro

Visual Effects

Rodrigo Castillo

Production Designer

Becky Claassen

Script Supervisor

Hayley J Collings

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Haley Collins

Assistant Director

James Culligan

Grip

Sean Donahue

Stunts

Sharyn Doudey

Other

Heather Douglas

Foley Artist

James Edward

Other

Laura Eriksen

Other

Roseanne Fiedler

Costume Designer

Todd Field

Coproducer

Chris Figler

Editor

George Flores

Boom Operator

Patrick Flores

Grip

Bonnie Foley

Production Coordinator

Brent Fraser

Music

Vince Garcia

Sound Mixer

Claudette Gil

Costumes

Kristen Gilmartin

Art Director

Lori Gordon

Makeup Assistant

Marcia Gray

Other

Marjorie Hagar

Assistant Editor

Bike Harris

Other

Shaun Healy

Transportation Coordinator

Gil Herrick

Location Manager

Michael Hicks

Adr Mixer

Shawna James

Other

Bill Jenkins

Other

Tony Jenkins

Rerecording

Ron Jeremy

Other

Berkley Johnson

Other

Ian Jordan

Swing

Phillip Jordan

Other

Stacy Kalkowski

Assistant Director

Barry Key

Sound Effects Editor

Robyn Knoll

Coproducer

Robyn Knoll

Casting

Bill Laswell

Music

Ben Liou

Cable Operator

Ben Liou

Assistant

Warren Longsworth

Grip

Rob Lueker

Best Boy

Ron Lunceford

Assistant Director

John Lutz

Consultant

Michael Lyle

Foley Artist

Dan Mack

Transportation Coordinator

John Mcmahon

Screenplay

Brian Morena

Assistant Camera Operator

David Moritz

Editor

Richard Nasworthy

Best Boy

Debbie Nielson

Craft Service

Barry Norwood

Assistant Camera Operator

Myles O'reilly

Makeup

Tom Parker

Assistant

Tony Parker

Other

Lemuel Price

Grip

Matthew Reilly

Visual Effects

Padrina Reyes

Transportation

Julio Ribeyro

Gaffer

Jeff Rogers

Consultant

Cesar Romero

Visual Effects

Doug Rymes

Other

Kate Schermerhorn

Photography

Vidette Schine

Associate Producer

Vidette Schine

Unit Production Manager

Yael Shpiller

Sound

John Sjogren

Associate Producer

Raymond Spiess

Dialogue Editor

Christian Staab

Key Grip

Fred Stuhr

Visual Effects

Andrew Taylor

Photography

Clive Taylor

Rerecording

Gabriela Tollman

Assistant Editor

Lydian Tone

Foley

Lydian Tone

Sound Effects Editor

Mike Tristano

Other

Roxana Zal

Producer

Scott Ziehl

Screenplay

Scott Ziehl

Producer

Film Details

Also Known As
Derapages
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Production Company
Ben Liou
Distribution Company
Unapix Films/Zeitgeist Films

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)


Patrick Cranshaw, the grizzly American character actor who spent the last four decades playing a series of old sidekicks and comic relief in such diverse movies as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) to last year's hit summer film Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005), died of natural causes on December 28 at his Fort Worth, Texas home. He was 86.

Born on June 17, 1919 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, Cranshaw became interested in acting while entertaining the troops with the Army Air Forces during World War II. After the war, he worked in radio, and slogged his way though bit parts in a few films before landing his first notable (if still uncredited) part as a bartender in the Claudette Colbert western Texas Lady (1955). It took a while before he got his next strong part, but he was memorable in his brief scene as the fidgety bank teller in Arthur Penn's classic Bonnie and Clyde (1967); and appeared as a hayseed in some wildly bad camp fare such as Mars Need Women and Hip, Hot and 21 (also 1967).

But so what if the good movie roles weren't coming? Cranshaw, with his small, expressive eyes, crinkled smile, and scraggly white beard, made for an ideal comic foil in sitcoms; and anyone with a passing interest for spotting character actors can't help but be impressed with his resume on that medium in the '70s: (The Odd Couple, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show, Mork and Mindy); the '80s: (The Dukes of Hazzard, Growing Pains, Perfect Strangers, Night Court, Diff'rent Strokes); '90s: (Coach, Ellen, Married...with Children, Just Shoot Me!, The Drew Carey Show); and even the 21st century: (Suddenly Susan, Monk).

Most impressively, Cranshaw should serve as model for all struggling actors that sheer persistency can pay off when you're hungry for some good roles in motion pictures, for he was in well in his seventies when he started gaining some decent screen time in The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), Everyone Says I Love You (1996), and Best in Show (2000). However, his most memorable moment in film came in the Will Ferrell/Vince Vaughn comedy Old School (2003). Here he played a octogenarian frat boy named Blue; and in one terrific sequence, he's dressed in his longjohns ready to wrestle two topless girls but dies of a heart attack due to overexcitement! He may have not won an Oscar® for his performance, but he developed something of cult following after that great comic turn.

Most recently, he played a Derby owner with Lindsay Lohan and Matt Dillon in Disney's Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005); and just completed the movie Air Buddies due for release next year. Cranshaw is survived by three children, Jan Ragland, Joe Cranshaw and Beverly Trautschold; his sister, Billie Gillespie; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)

Patrick Cranshaw (1919-2005)

Patrick Cranshaw, the grizzly American character actor who spent the last four decades playing a series of old sidekicks and comic relief in such diverse movies as Bonnie and Clyde (1967) to last year's hit summer film Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005), died of natural causes on December 28 at his Fort Worth, Texas home. He was 86. Born on June 17, 1919 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, Cranshaw became interested in acting while entertaining the troops with the Army Air Forces during World War II. After the war, he worked in radio, and slogged his way though bit parts in a few films before landing his first notable (if still uncredited) part as a bartender in the Claudette Colbert western Texas Lady (1955). It took a while before he got his next strong part, but he was memorable in his brief scene as the fidgety bank teller in Arthur Penn's classic Bonnie and Clyde (1967); and appeared as a hayseed in some wildly bad camp fare such as Mars Need Women and Hip, Hot and 21 (also 1967). But so what if the good movie roles weren't coming? Cranshaw, with his small, expressive eyes, crinkled smile, and scraggly white beard, made for an ideal comic foil in sitcoms; and anyone with a passing interest for spotting character actors can't help but be impressed with his resume on that medium in the '70s: (The Odd Couple, Sanford and Son, The Bob Newhart Show, Mork and Mindy); the '80s: (The Dukes of Hazzard, Growing Pains, Perfect Strangers, Night Court, Diff'rent Strokes); '90s: (Coach, Ellen, Married...with Children, Just Shoot Me!, The Drew Carey Show); and even the 21st century: (Suddenly Susan, Monk). Most impressively, Cranshaw should serve as model for all struggling actors that sheer persistency can pay off when you're hungry for some good roles in motion pictures, for he was in well in his seventies when he started gaining some decent screen time in The Beverly Hillbillies (1993), The Hudsucker Proxy (1994), Everyone Says I Love You (1996), and Best in Show (2000). However, his most memorable moment in film came in the Will Ferrell/Vince Vaughn comedy Old School (2003). Here he played a octogenarian frat boy named Blue; and in one terrific sequence, he's dressed in his longjohns ready to wrestle two topless girls but dies of a heart attack due to overexcitement! He may have not won an Oscar® for his performance, but he developed something of cult following after that great comic turn. Most recently, he played a Derby owner with Lindsay Lohan and Matt Dillon in Disney's Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005); and just completed the movie Air Buddies due for release next year. Cranshaw is survived by three children, Jan Ragland, Joe Cranshaw and Beverly Trautschold; his sister, Billie Gillespie; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States July 1998 (Shown at Karlovy Vary International Film Festival July 3-11, 1998.)

Released in United States Summer July 2, 1999

Released in United States July 30, 1999 (Nuart; Los Angeles)

Winner of best feature at the 1998 Los Angeles Independent Film Festival.

Released in United States 1998

Released in United States April 1998

Released in United States July 1998

Released in United States July 30, 1999

Released in United States June 1999

Released in United States May 1999

Released in United States October 1998

Released in United States on Video November 9, 1999

Released in United States September 1998

Released in United States Summer July 2, 1999

Shown at Dockers Khakis/IFP's Classically Independent Film Festival in Los Angeles (Writers Guild Theater) June 25-28, 1999.

Shown at Dockers Khakis/IFP's Classically Independent Film Festival in New York City (Film Forum) May 7-10, 1999.

Shown at Karlovy Vary International Film Festival July 3-11, 1998.

Shown at Los Angeles Independent Film Festival April 16-20, 1998.

Shown at Raindance Film Showcase in London October 22-31, 1998.

Shown at Seattle International Film Festival May 21 - June 14, 1998.

Shown at Toronto International Film Festival (Contemporary World Cinema) September 10-19, 1998.

Feature directorial debut for Scott Ziehl.

Released in United States 1998 (Shown at Seattle International Film Festival May 21 - June 14, 1998.)

Released in United States April 1998 (Shown at Los Angeles Independent Film Festival April 16-20, 1998.)

Released in United States May 1999 (Shown at Dockers Khakis/IFP's Classically Independent Film Festival in New York City (Film Forum) May 7-10, 1999.)

Released in United States June 1999 (Shown at Dockers Khakis/IFP's Classically Independent Film Festival in Los Angeles (Writers Guild Theater) June 25-28, 1999.)

Released in United States September 1998 (Shown at Toronto International Film Festival (Contemporary World Cinema) September 10-19, 1998.)

Released in United States October 1998 (Shown at Raindance Film Showcase in London October 22-31, 1998.)

Released in United States on Video November 9, 1999