Reds


3h 20m 1981
Reds

Brief Synopsis

American activist John Reed travels to Russia to witness the revolution and its aftermath.

Film Details

Also Known As
NST
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Historical
War
Biography
Political
Release Date
1981
Location
Sussex, England, United Kingdom; Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom; Seville, Spain; Guadix, Spain; London, England, United Kingdom; Ivalo, Finland; Los Angeles, California, USA; Rovaniemi, Finland; New York City, New York, USA; Greater Manchester, England, United Kingdom; Kemijarvi, Finland; Madrid, Spain; Villa Canjasi, Spain; Helsinki, Finland; Washington, DC, USA; Segovia, Spain

Technical Specs

Duration
3h 20m

Synopsis

Political drama about the stormy romantic partnership of journalist-revolutionary Jack Reed, author of "Ten Days That Shook the World," and writer-artist Louise Bryant, set against the backdrop of World War I and the Russian Revolution.

Crew

Roberto Alberti

Other

David Allen

Sound Engineer

Dede Allen

Executive Producer

Dede Allen

Editor

David Appleby

Photography

Paco Ardura

Wrangler

Jennifer Auge

Apprentice

Nat D. Ayer

Song

George Ball

Props

George Ball

Property Master

Debra Bard

Apprentice

Reverend Sabine Baring-gould

Song

Zelda Barron

Consultant

Zelda Barron

Script Supervisor

Donah Bassett

Negative Cutting

Katherine Lee Bates

Song

Eric Beason

Assistant Editor

Warren Beatty

Producer

Warren Beatty

Screenplay

Robert Birnbaum

Assistant Director

Bruce Bisenz

Sound Mixer

Stan Bochner

Sound Editor

Harry Peck Bolles

Sound Editor

Simon Bosanquet

Location Manager

Rebecca Breed

Wardrobe

A Seymour Brown

Song

Richard Brown

Carpenter

Fern Buchner

Makeup

Alex Burks

Camera Operator

Linda Burtenshaw

Assistant

Louis F Bush

Song

Filippo Cafolla

Electrician

Roy Carnon

Art Department

Joan Carpenter

Hair

Jack Cartier

Construction Manager

Sean Casey

Other

Lou Cerborino

Sound Editor

Lance Chapman

Other

Richard P. Cirincione

Sound Editor

Laura Civiello

Sound Editor

Nobby Clark

Other

Juan Clemente

Location Manager

George M. Cohan

Song

Randall Coleman

Sound Editor

Joe Cooper

Song

Angelo Corrao

Associate Editor

Luigi Creatore

Song

Tony Cridlin

Grip

Noel Davis

Casting

Bob Dawson

Special Effects

Pierre Degeyter

Song

Marjorie Deutsch

Sound Editor

Marion Dougherty

Casting

Jay Dranch

Sound Editor

Nic Ede

Wardrobe Assistant

Des Edwards

Sound

Carolyn L. Elias

Makeup

Carolyn L. Elias

Hair

Paul Engelen

Makeup

Vicente Escriva

Production Manager

Judith Evans

Researcher

Martin Evans

Best Boy

Helen L Feibelmann

Assistant

Sam Fine

Editor

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

Tom Fleischman

Sound

Nancy Foy

Casting

Edward Francis

Props

Peter C Frank

Sound Editor

Enrique Gabriel

Assistant Director

Leslie Gaulin

Assistant Editor

Jeremy Gee

Other

Gail Geibel

Production Coordinator

David Gelfand

Sound Editor

Paul Gemignani

Music Conductor

Paul Gemignani

Music Supervisor

L. Wolfe Gilbert

Song

Fernando Gonzalez

Art Director

Michael G Green

Assistant Director

Jerry Greenberg

Editing

Gillian Gregory

Choreographer

Trevor Griffiths

Screenplay

Marshall Grupp

Sound Editor

Dave Grusin

Music

Thomas Gulino

Sound Editor

Catherine Halloran

Wardrobe Assistant

Eddy Hanson

Song

Darrell Hanzalik

Sound Editor

Paul Heffernan

Set Decorator

John Andrew Hill

Apprentice

Walter Hirsch

Song

Kate Hirson

Sound Editor

Richard Hiscott

Editing

A. Kitman Ho

Production Manager

Simon Holland

Art Director

Kaj Holmberg

Production Manager

Alan Hopkins

Assistant Director

Denis Hopperton

Props

Ray Hubley

Assistant Editor

Barbara Huger

Other

Jane Jenkins

Casting

Alan John

Accounting Assistant

Charles L Johnson

Song

Scott Joplin

Song

Carl Joy

Casting

Frank Kaluga

Sound

Michael Karp

Song

Simon Kaye

Sound

Beverley Keogh

Casting Associate

Alan Killick

Assistant Editor

Dave King

Researcher

Jack King

Production Accountant

John King

Other

Rosalie King

Accounting Assistant

Bruce Kitzmeyer

Sound Editor

Joseph John Kontra

Assistant Director

Fritz Kreisler

Song

William Kruzykowski

Apprentice

Richard Lamotte

Costume Supervisor

Bob Lawrance

Makeup

Bob Lawrence

Makeup

Susan Lazarus

Sound Editor

Tommy Lee

Transportation

Toivo Lehmusvirta

Unit Manager

Martin Levenstein

Assistant Editor

Hal Levinsohn

Sound Editor

Sam Lewis

Song

Dan Lieberstein

Sound Editor

Ake Lindman

Production Consultant

Doug Lister

Transportation

William Loger

Wardrobe

Bert Long

Carpenter

David L Macleod

Associate Producer

Micki Manning

Production Assistant

Alfredo Marchetti

Grip

Mario Marchetti

Grip

Mauro Marchetti

Camera Assistant

Richard Marden

Editing

Elaine May

Screenplay

Jane Mcculley

Sound Editor

Craig Mckay

Editor

Anneli Merila

Accountant

Anneli Merila

Other

Carl Mesterton

Assistant Editor

Joan Metzger

Assistant Editor

Al Mian

Sound

Al Mian

Sound Mixer

Lillian Michelson

Researcher

Redmond Morris

Location Manager

Louis R Muir

Song

Yvette Nable

Sound Editor

Phil Naso

Hair

Peter Odabashian

Sound Editor

Antonio Parra

Special Effects

Brian Peachey

Associate Editor

Hugo Peretti

Song

H W Petrie

Music

Jeremy Pikser

Consultant

Richard Pointing

Wardrobe Supervisor

Patsy Pollock

Casting

Martina Diaz Porras

Wardrobe

Eugene Pottier

Song

Mickey Pugh

Props

Marilyn Putnam

Wardrobe

Jill Quertier

Production

James T Quinn

Assistant Director

Asad Qureshi

Production Assistant

Mark Rathaus

Sound Editor

David Ray

Sound Editor

David Reibman

Editor

Simon Relph

Executive Producer

Simon Relph

Assistant Director

Gretchen Rennell

Casting

Barry Richardson

Hair

Joshua Rifkin

Song Performer

Kuki Lopez Rodero

Assistant Director

David Rogow

Apprentice

Cindy Kaplan Rooney

Assistant Editor

Gina Roose

Sound Editor

Fred Rosenberg

Sound Editor

Robert A Rosenstone

Consultant

Thomas Roysden

Set Decorator

Shirley Russell

Costume Designer

Philip Sanderson

Assistant Editor

Jill Savitt

Assistant Editor

William S. Scharf

Assistant Editor

Maurice Schell

Sound Editor

Phillip Schopper

Color

B Thomas Seidman

Assistant Director

Michael Seirton

On-Set Dresser

Laurie Shane

Electrician

David Sharlein

Video

Rosalind Shingleton

Assistant Art Director

David J Siegel

Sound Editor

Judy Silberstein

Apprentice

Claire Simpson

Assistant Editor

Barney Snelgrove

Song

Glen Snelgrove

Song

Seymore Snelgrove

Song

Stephen Sondheim

Music

Videos

Movie Clip

Reds (1981) - What Haven't We Covered? Portland, Oregon, 1915, a somewhat-contrived version of the meeting of the principals (writer-director Warren Beatty as journalist John "Jack" Reed, Diane Keaton as native Louise Bryant), M. Emmet Walsh the pompous orator at a local civic club, early in Reds, 1981.
Reds (1981) - They Are Waiting For Your Example Moscow, 1917, writer-director Warren Beatty as American radical journalist John “Jack” Reed, with Diane Keaton as his colleague and wife Louise Bryant, swept into supporting a general strike, though not recreating a specific historic event, in Reds, 1981.
Reds (1981) - Go Where The Freedom Is! Meeting for a second time, at a polite Portland, Oregon dinner party, visiting journalist Jack Reed (director Warren Beatty) has learned that Louise (Diane Keaton), who eagerly interviewed him earlier, is married, then more, in Reds, 1981.
Reds (1981) - The Bolsheviks Are Small Potatoes Writer-director Warren Beatty as John Reed in New York, 1917, recovering from the removal of a diseased kidney, reads correspondence from lover Louise Bryant (Diane Keaton) in Paris, then gets news undermining hers, from journalist Pete Van Wherry (Gene Hackman), in Reds, 1981.
Reds (1981) - I Wouldn't Share You Louise Bryant (Diane Keaton) in an early encounter with Eugene O'Neill (Jack Nicholson), friend of her lover and writer of a play in which she's performing, from director and star Warren Beatty's Reds, 1981.
Reds (1981) - One Big Union Ca. 1916, probably New Jersey, writer-director-star Warren Beatty as activist-journalist John “Jack” Reed at an IWW (Industrial Workers Of The World) gathering, Dolph Sweet playing the legendary organizer Big Bill Haywood, in Beatty’s historical epic Reds, 1981.

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
NST
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Historical
War
Biography
Political
Release Date
1981
Location
Sussex, England, United Kingdom; Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom; Seville, Spain; Guadix, Spain; London, England, United Kingdom; Ivalo, Finland; Los Angeles, California, USA; Rovaniemi, Finland; New York City, New York, USA; Greater Manchester, England, United Kingdom; Kemijarvi, Finland; Madrid, Spain; Villa Canjasi, Spain; Helsinki, Finland; Washington, DC, USA; Segovia, Spain

Technical Specs

Duration
3h 20m

Award Wins

Best Cinematography

1981

Best Director

1981
Warren Beatty

Best Supporting Actress

1981
Maureen Stapleton

Award Nominations

Best Actor

1981
Warren Beatty

Best Actress

1981
Diane Keaton

Best Art Direction

1981
Richard Sylbert

Best Costume Design

1981
Shirley Russell

Best Editing

1981
Dede Allen

Best Editing

1981
Craig Mckay

Best Original Screenplay

1981

Best Picture

1981

Best Sound

1981

Best Supporting Actor

1981
Jack Nicholson

Articles

Reds


Timing, as they say, is everything. In 1981, with the Reagan Era dawning, the American movie-going public might have been by and large disinclined to embrace an epic-length historical romance centered on two prominent radical socialists of the 1910s. The timing ultimately proved less than precipitous for Warren Beatty, who had nurtured the concept since the early 1970s, and whose belief in the project was sufficient to get the green light from the powers that be at Paramount. Ultimately, Reds (1981) would struggle to recoup its staggering production costs (an estimated $45 million) in theaters. The critical praise garnered by the film was considerable, however, and it stands as a work of considerable sweep and scope with a realistic and, at times, painfully honest love story at its core.

In the figure of John Reed (1887-1920), Beatty found a compelling paradox. Born to privilege and educated at Harvard, the experiences of his journalism career led him to leftist thought. Reporting from Russia as the Bolsheviks rose to power, he authored his best-known work Ten Days That Shook the World in 1919. The year after its publication, Reed, then in the employ of the Soviet propaganda ministry, took ill and died, becoming the only American laid to rest in the Kremlin. In a 1976 collaboration with British playwright Trevor Griffiths, Beatty fashioned a script that juxtaposed Reed's notorious public life with his ongoing affair with Louise Bryant, the Oregon housewife and amateur journalist who left her world behind to travel in Reed's circle of Greenwich Village intellectuals.

The screenplay would subsequently undergo tweaking by Elaine May and Robert Towne, and Beatty assembled a distinguished cast and crew, including his off-screen leading lady of the moment, Diane Keaton, to play Bryant to his Reed. The film's opening sequence establishes Reed's thirst to be on the cutting edge of history, depicting his reckless pursuit of frontline action during the Mexican Revolution. The following year finds Reed at home in his native Portland, flirting with Bryant as she tries to wrest an interview from him. His charisma leads her to follow him east, where she uncomfortably tries to hold her own with his formidable cronies such as Emma Goldman (Maureen Stapleton), Max Eastman (Edward Herrmann) and Eugene O'Neill (Jack Nicholson).

To salvage the relationship, the couple set up housekeeping in Provincetown. It doesn't take long for the restless Reed to chafe under those circumstances, however, and he heads for Chicago, against Bryant's wishes, to cover the 1916 Democratic Convention. In his absence, she falls into an affair with O'Neill; the returning Reed owns up to his own infidelities once he learns of the truth. Bryant takes flight to Europe to work as a war correspondent; Reed, after a flare-up of the kidney disorder that eventually killed him, opts to take the same path. Reluctantly reunited as professionals, the two find their passion rekindled as they are swept up in the fall of Russia's czarist regime.

All these events merely take Reds up to the intermission. The second act follows Reed's short life in the wake of Ten Days' publication, and the growing disillusionment he suffered with both the American socialist movement and the bureaucracy that the Bolsheviks imposed on Moscow that he experienced firsthand when he accepted his political appointment.

In Reds, Beatty used an intriguing device to effectively lend his narrative a sense of time and place. Interspersed throughout the film is interview footage, shot against a simple black background, featuring the recollections of over two dozen of Reed and Bryant's contemporaries. Beatty opted against the use of superimposed graphics to identify his "witnesses"-- including Henry Miller, Adela Rogers St. John, Rebecca West, George Jessel, Will Durant and George Seldes-- in order to avoid giving the film an overly documentary feel.

The shoot for Reds spanned a grueling 240 days from August 1979 to July 1980. Beatty's request to the Soviet government to film in Leningrad was rejected, so he turned to Helsinki for its architectural similarities. The film would ultimately be primarily shot in England, with more location work in New York, Washington, and the Seville region in Spain, which was utilized to double for Baku in Russia. (In a famous incident, director Beatty sought to explain to his Spanish extras their motivation by playing out Reed's beliefs. They responded by holding out for a $20-a-day pay hike.)

Between Beatty's creative demands on his cast and crew, and the front office pressure he was feeling as the cost overruns continued to mount, tensions ran high on the set. The strains would ultimately take a toll on Beatty's relationship with Keaton. In Jonathan Moor's Diane Keaton: The Story of the Real Annie Hall mention was made of a photo journal from the set kept by the novelist Jerzy Kosinski, whom Beatty had very effectively cast as the martinet functionary Zinoviev. "[I]n many, many of these photographs a very angry Keaton is captured arguing with a scowling Beatty in front of the camera," Moor observed.

Whether the blame rests with prevalent political sentiment or an ill-conceived and executed marketing campaign, Reds struggled to find a popular audience. It was a tide that the film's considerable Oscar buzz-- 12 nominations overall, with three prizes going to Stapleton, Beatty's direction, and Vittorio Storaro's cinematography-- did little to stem. It's unfortunate, as the film plays far less like an endorsement of communist thought than as an indictment of Reed's shortcomings. At its core is a story of a man willing to make the ultimate sacrifice for principle, told in a fashion that transcends its political and historical context.

Producer: Warren Beatty, David L. MacLeod, Simon Relph, Dede Allen
Director: Warren Beatty
Screenplay: Warren Beatty, Trevor Griffiths, John Reed (book)
Cinematography: Vittorio Storaro
Film Editing: Dede Allen, Craig McKay
Art Direction: Simon Holland
Music: Stephen Sondheim, Dave Grusin
Cast: Warren Beatty (John Reed), Diane Keaton (Louise Bryant), Edward Herrmann (Max Eastman), Jerzy Kosinski (Grigory Zinoviev), Jack Nicholson (Eugene O'Neill), Paul Sorvino (Louis Fraina), Maureen Stapleton (Emma Goldman), Nicolas Coster (Paul Trullinger), M. Emmet Walsh (Speaker at Liberal Club), Bessie Love (Mrs. Partlow), Ian Wolfe (Mr. Partlow), George Plimpton (Horace Whigham), Dolph Sweet (Big Bill Haywood).
C-194m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Jay S. Steinberg
Reds

Reds

Timing, as they say, is everything. In 1981, with the Reagan Era dawning, the American movie-going public might have been by and large disinclined to embrace an epic-length historical romance centered on two prominent radical socialists of the 1910s. The timing ultimately proved less than precipitous for Warren Beatty, who had nurtured the concept since the early 1970s, and whose belief in the project was sufficient to get the green light from the powers that be at Paramount. Ultimately, Reds (1981) would struggle to recoup its staggering production costs (an estimated $45 million) in theaters. The critical praise garnered by the film was considerable, however, and it stands as a work of considerable sweep and scope with a realistic and, at times, painfully honest love story at its core. In the figure of John Reed (1887-1920), Beatty found a compelling paradox. Born to privilege and educated at Harvard, the experiences of his journalism career led him to leftist thought. Reporting from Russia as the Bolsheviks rose to power, he authored his best-known work Ten Days That Shook the World in 1919. The year after its publication, Reed, then in the employ of the Soviet propaganda ministry, took ill and died, becoming the only American laid to rest in the Kremlin. In a 1976 collaboration with British playwright Trevor Griffiths, Beatty fashioned a script that juxtaposed Reed's notorious public life with his ongoing affair with Louise Bryant, the Oregon housewife and amateur journalist who left her world behind to travel in Reed's circle of Greenwich Village intellectuals. The screenplay would subsequently undergo tweaking by Elaine May and Robert Towne, and Beatty assembled a distinguished cast and crew, including his off-screen leading lady of the moment, Diane Keaton, to play Bryant to his Reed. The film's opening sequence establishes Reed's thirst to be on the cutting edge of history, depicting his reckless pursuit of frontline action during the Mexican Revolution. The following year finds Reed at home in his native Portland, flirting with Bryant as she tries to wrest an interview from him. His charisma leads her to follow him east, where she uncomfortably tries to hold her own with his formidable cronies such as Emma Goldman (Maureen Stapleton), Max Eastman (Edward Herrmann) and Eugene O'Neill (Jack Nicholson). To salvage the relationship, the couple set up housekeeping in Provincetown. It doesn't take long for the restless Reed to chafe under those circumstances, however, and he heads for Chicago, against Bryant's wishes, to cover the 1916 Democratic Convention. In his absence, she falls into an affair with O'Neill; the returning Reed owns up to his own infidelities once he learns of the truth. Bryant takes flight to Europe to work as a war correspondent; Reed, after a flare-up of the kidney disorder that eventually killed him, opts to take the same path. Reluctantly reunited as professionals, the two find their passion rekindled as they are swept up in the fall of Russia's czarist regime. All these events merely take Reds up to the intermission. The second act follows Reed's short life in the wake of Ten Days' publication, and the growing disillusionment he suffered with both the American socialist movement and the bureaucracy that the Bolsheviks imposed on Moscow that he experienced firsthand when he accepted his political appointment. In Reds, Beatty used an intriguing device to effectively lend his narrative a sense of time and place. Interspersed throughout the film is interview footage, shot against a simple black background, featuring the recollections of over two dozen of Reed and Bryant's contemporaries. Beatty opted against the use of superimposed graphics to identify his "witnesses"-- including Henry Miller, Adela Rogers St. John, Rebecca West, George Jessel, Will Durant and George Seldes-- in order to avoid giving the film an overly documentary feel. The shoot for Reds spanned a grueling 240 days from August 1979 to July 1980. Beatty's request to the Soviet government to film in Leningrad was rejected, so he turned to Helsinki for its architectural similarities. The film would ultimately be primarily shot in England, with more location work in New York, Washington, and the Seville region in Spain, which was utilized to double for Baku in Russia. (In a famous incident, director Beatty sought to explain to his Spanish extras their motivation by playing out Reed's beliefs. They responded by holding out for a $20-a-day pay hike.) Between Beatty's creative demands on his cast and crew, and the front office pressure he was feeling as the cost overruns continued to mount, tensions ran high on the set. The strains would ultimately take a toll on Beatty's relationship with Keaton. In Jonathan Moor's Diane Keaton: The Story of the Real Annie Hall mention was made of a photo journal from the set kept by the novelist Jerzy Kosinski, whom Beatty had very effectively cast as the martinet functionary Zinoviev. "[I]n many, many of these photographs a very angry Keaton is captured arguing with a scowling Beatty in front of the camera," Moor observed. Whether the blame rests with prevalent political sentiment or an ill-conceived and executed marketing campaign, Reds struggled to find a popular audience. It was a tide that the film's considerable Oscar buzz-- 12 nominations overall, with three prizes going to Stapleton, Beatty's direction, and Vittorio Storaro's cinematography-- did little to stem. It's unfortunate, as the film plays far less like an endorsement of communist thought than as an indictment of Reed's shortcomings. At its core is a story of a man willing to make the ultimate sacrifice for principle, told in a fashion that transcends its political and historical context. Producer: Warren Beatty, David L. MacLeod, Simon Relph, Dede Allen Director: Warren Beatty Screenplay: Warren Beatty, Trevor Griffiths, John Reed (book) Cinematography: Vittorio Storaro Film Editing: Dede Allen, Craig McKay Art Direction: Simon Holland Music: Stephen Sondheim, Dave Grusin Cast: Warren Beatty (John Reed), Diane Keaton (Louise Bryant), Edward Herrmann (Max Eastman), Jerzy Kosinski (Grigory Zinoviev), Jack Nicholson (Eugene O'Neill), Paul Sorvino (Louis Fraina), Maureen Stapleton (Emma Goldman), Nicolas Coster (Paul Trullinger), M. Emmet Walsh (Speaker at Liberal Club), Bessie Love (Mrs. Partlow), Ian Wolfe (Mr. Partlow), George Plimpton (Horace Whigham), Dolph Sweet (Big Bill Haywood). C-194m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Jay S. Steinberg

George Plimpton, 1927-2003


George Plimpton, the wry, self-effacing author whose engaging film appearances enlivened many movies over the years, died of a heart attack on September 25 in his Manhattan apartment. He was 76. George Ames Plimpton was born on March 18, 1927 in New York City. The son of a diplomat, he was well connected to high society. A scholarly man of the letters, hip, urbane bohemians knew him for decades as the unpaid editor to the much respected literary quarterly, The Paris Review, which introduced emerging authors such as Gore Vidal and Jack Kerouac. In 1963, the gaunt, unassuming Plimpton documented his time training with the Detroit Lions, and turned the antics into a shrewd, witty piece of sports fulfillment, Paper Lion. The film was adapted for the big screen by Alex March in 1968 with Alan Alda playing the role of Plimpton. That same year, he made his film debut as a reporter in Gordon Douglas' police thriller The Detective (1968) starring Frank Sinatra and followed that up with an amusing cameo as a gunman shot my John Wayne in Howard Hawks' Rio Lobo (1970). A few more cameos came up over the years, but it wasn't until the '90s that he proved he himself a capable performer and found regular film work: an appropriate role as a talk show moderator in Jodie Foster's Little Man Tate's (1991), the president's lawyer in Oliver Stone's Nixon (1995); a psychologist in Gus Van Zandt's Good Will Hunting (1997); a clubgoer in Whit Stillman's discursive drama The Last Day's of Disco (1998); and a very comical doctor in Jean- Marie Poire's Just VisitingThe Simpsons playing a professor who runs a fixed spelling bee! He is survived by his wife Sara Whitehead Dudley and four children. Michael T. Toole

George Plimpton, 1927-2003

George Plimpton, the wry, self-effacing author whose engaging film appearances enlivened many movies over the years, died of a heart attack on September 25 in his Manhattan apartment. He was 76. George Ames Plimpton was born on March 18, 1927 in New York City. The son of a diplomat, he was well connected to high society. A scholarly man of the letters, hip, urbane bohemians knew him for decades as the unpaid editor to the much respected literary quarterly, The Paris Review, which introduced emerging authors such as Gore Vidal and Jack Kerouac. In 1963, the gaunt, unassuming Plimpton documented his time training with the Detroit Lions, and turned the antics into a shrewd, witty piece of sports fulfillment, Paper Lion. The film was adapted for the big screen by Alex March in 1968 with Alan Alda playing the role of Plimpton. That same year, he made his film debut as a reporter in Gordon Douglas' police thriller The Detective (1968) starring Frank Sinatra and followed that up with an amusing cameo as a gunman shot my John Wayne in Howard Hawks' Rio Lobo (1970). A few more cameos came up over the years, but it wasn't until the '90s that he proved he himself a capable performer and found regular film work: an appropriate role as a talk show moderator in Jodie Foster's Little Man Tate's (1991), the president's lawyer in Oliver Stone's Nixon (1995); a psychologist in Gus Van Zandt's Good Will Hunting (1997); a clubgoer in Whit Stillman's discursive drama The Last Day's of Disco (1998); and a very comical doctor in Jean- Marie Poire's Just Visiting

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 4, 1981

Released in United States 2006

Shown at New York Film Festival September 29-October 15, 2006.

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States Winter December 4, 1981

Released in United States 2006 (Shown at New York Film Festival September 29-October 15, 2006.)

Released in United States December 1981

Released in United States December 1981