Evelyn


1h 33m 2002

Brief Synopsis

A drama based on the true story of Desmond Doyle and his young children, Evelyn, Maurice and Dermot. Abandoned by his wife, Doyle does his best to make it as a single dad, raising his kids alone in Ireland in 1953. Their life isn't easy--but above all else in the world, Doyle loves his children. Unf

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
2002
Production Company
Angel Studios; Bank Of Ireland Group; Cine Electric, Ltd.; Cineimage; Cool Music; Fintage House; First Look Holdings; Irish Dreamtime; Marsh Inc.; Pinewood Studios, Ltd.; Reelsound Ltd; Sapex; Sargent Disc, Ltd.; Sony Pictures Scoring Stage; Technicolor; United Artists Films
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM ); DeAPlaneta; Hoyts Distribution; MGM Distribution Company; MGM Home Entertainment; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Monopole Pathe Films Ag; PathT International; Ster-Kinekor; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
Ardmore Studios, Dublin, Ireland

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m

Synopsis

A drama based on the true story of Desmond Doyle and his young children, Evelyn, Maurice and Dermot. Abandoned by his wife, Doyle does his best to make it as a single dad, raising his kids alone in Ireland in 1953. Their life isn't easy--but above all else in the world, Doyle loves his children. Unfortunately, when his wife's mother reports her daughter's abandonment to the authorities, the power of the Church and the Irish courts take his children away and put them in orphanages. Doyle is devastated. Vowing to reunite his family, he enlists the help of new friend Bernadette Beattie, her solicitor brother Michael, their American lawyer friend Nick and Nick's mentor Tom Connolly. Together they attempt to do what has never been done before--challenge a law before the Irish Supreme Court. Doyle's fight to keep his family intact becomes an uplifting testament to the strength of a father's love and the power of the human spirit.

Crew

Hugo Adams

Assistant Sound Editor

Julie Ankerson

Foley Artist

Fabienne Arbogast

Auto Conform

Ann K Aylward

1st Apprentice Editor (U.K.)

Ian Bailie

Art Director

Garret Baldwin

Best Boy

Kevan Barker

Line Producer

Ruth Barry

Art Department

Joan Bergin

Costume Designer

Shane Bisgood

Location Assistant

Steve Boag

Visual Effects Supervisor

Phil Bodger

Music Scoring Mixer

Phil Bodger

Music Recorder

Simon Bosanquet

Executive Producer

Donnacha Brady

Assistant Location Manager

Mick Doyle Bray

Special Effects

Pierce Brosnan

Producer

Pierce Brosnan

Song Performer ("On The Banks Of The Roses"), Song Performer ("The Parting Glass")

Martin Bullard

Opticals Supervision

Renee Foley Burke

Script Supervisor

Julie Busher

Graphics

Alan Butler

Focus Puller

David Byrne

Unit Production Manager

Steve Cardone

Other

Jeff Carter

Office Production Assistant (La)

Mary Casey

1st Assistant Editor (Ireland)

Susan Casey

Trainee Maker

Chris Charalambous

Office Production Assistant (La)

Jason Clarke

Construction Runaround

Dermot Cleary

Location Manager

Gabriel Coates

Stand-By Carpenter

Nicola Conlon

Assistant (To Mr. Brosnan)

John Connon

2nd Grip

June Connon

Chargehand/Standby Props

Louis Conroy

Gaffer

Jenny Cooney

Art Department Trainee

Kieran Corrigan

Executive Producer

Jason Costelloe

Conform Editor

Rich Cowan

First Assistant Director

Marcia Crayford

Orchestra Leader

Keith Cullen

Trainee Standby Props

Michelle Cunniffe

Adr Mixer (Ardmore Studios)

Matt Curtis

Main Titles Design

Brendan Deasy

Production Sound Mixer

Humphrey Dixon

Editor

Bernadette Dooley

Key Hair Stylist

Martin Doyle

Dressing Props

William Doyle

Electrician

Jessica Drum

Camera Trainee

Olive Drynan

Unit Nurse

Dina Eaton

Preview Music Editor

Emer Egan

Accounts Assistant

Louis Elman

Adr Voice Casting

Stephen Endelman

Musical Director

Stephen Endelman

Composer

Stephen Endelman

Original Music

Paschal Farrell

Senior Supervising Carpenter

John Fewell

Foley Artist

Dave Flanagan

Dressing Props

Andre Fleurin

Director Of Photography

Maurice Foley

Special Effects Supervisor

Sarah J Francis

Loader

Esther Goodhew

Music Contractor (Cool Music)

Carol Graham

Wardrobe Assistant

Vivienne Gray

Assistant Art Director

Charles Green

Color Grading

David Grennan

"B" Camera Focus Puller

Brendan Gunn

Dialect Coach

Dave Gurney

Optical Camera

Jeanette Haley

Post-Production Supervisor

Robert Hamilton

Video Assist

Cathy Handelman

Production Coordinator

Simon Harding

Steadicam Operator

Simon Harding

Director Of Photography (2nd Unit)

Iseult Harrington

Office Production Assistant

Gemma Hayes

Song Performer ("Angel Rays")

John Hayward

Rerecording Mixer

Paul Hedges

Property Master

James Hennessy

Chargehand/Rigger

Lee Herrick

Dialogue Editor

Mark Heslop

Supervising Sound Editor

Jonathan Hession

Still Photographer

Noel Holland

Electrician

John Hubbard

Casting

Ros Hubbard

Casting

Nicola Hughes

Trainee Props

James Hunt

Scenic Artist

Malcolm Huse

Dolly Grip

Ciara James

Trainee Costume Designer

Ian Johns

Sound Trainee

Lyn Johnson

Key Makeup

Tom Joyner

Other

Jimmy Kavanagh

Drapes

John Kavanagh

Transportation Captain

Eberhard Kayser

Executive Producer

Derek Kelly

Special Effects

Seamus Kelly

Dressing Props

Tracy Kelly

Accounts Trainee

Christopher Kennedy

Music Editor

Sabine Kertscher

Compositing

Sabine Kertscher

Digital Effects

Raymond Kirk

3rd Assistant Director

Clare Lambe

Assistant Makeup

John Loughney

Location Trainee

Gerry Lundberg

Publicity

Gerry Lundberg

Unit Publicist

Tom Lundy

Stand-By Painter

Brian Lynch

Stand-In

Josie Macavin

Set Decorator

Ian Madden

Electrician

Owen Magee

Set Production Assistant

Frank Matthews

Master Plasterer

Derbhla Mcclelland

Wardrobe Trainee

Helen Mccusker

Wardrobe Trainee

Gary Mcginty

Draughtsman

Jean Mcgrath

Adr Mixer (Ardmore Studios)

Philip Mckeon

"B" Camera Focus Puller

Bronco Mcloughlin

Stunt Coordinator

Brendan Mcnicholl

Stand-By Rigger

Colin Morris

Personal Driver (For Mr. Brosnan)

Van Morrison

Song Performer ("Sitting On Top Of The World")

Mark Mottram

Stunt Double (For Mr. Brosnan)

Fiona Mullally

Trainee Art Director

Owen Murnane

Master Scenic Painter

Linda Murphy

Art Department Coordinator

Sinead Murphy

Set Production Assistant

Linda Nartey

2nd Assistant Film Editor

Tony Nicholson

Chargehand/Dressing Props

Anthony Nugent

Trainee Props

Lucie Nunan

Tutor

Alan O'brien

Office Production Assistant

Gabriel O'brien

Wardrobe Assistant

Vivion O'brien

Chargehand Carpenter

Melissa O'connor

Wardrobe Trainee

Sinead O'doherty

Assistant Unit Publicist

Anna Maria O'flanagan

Avid Assistant Editor

Michelle O'mahony

Assistant (Mr. Corrigan)

Shane O'neill

"B" Camera Focus Puller

Andy O'reilly

Camera Trainee

Frances O'reilly

Assistant (To Mr. Quinn And Ms. Marguilies)

Tara O'sullivan

Assistant Production Coordinator

Peter O'toole

Generator Operator

Mario Ohoven

Executive Producer

Michael Ohoven

Producer

Cynthia A Palormo

Associate Producer

Cynthia Palormo

Associate Producer

Geraldine Patten

Assistant (To Mr. Bosanquet)

Paul Pender

Screenwriter

Paul Pender

Co-Producer

Grahame Peters

Foley Editor

Sheelagh Power

Property Buyer

Rick Provenzano

Hair Stylist (For Mr. Brosnan)

Richard Pryke

Rerecording Mixer

Gary Purdy

Standby Stagehand

John Purdy

Chargehand/Stagehand

Rob Quigley

Production Accountant

Bairbre Quinn

Extras Coordinator

Eddie Quinn

Boom Operator

Hannah Quinn

2nd Assistant Director

Justine Redfern

Production Associate

George Edward Regis

Music Clearances

Matthias Reisser

Camera Trainee

Gerard Richardson

Supervising Painter

Philip Richardson

Storeman/Dressing Props

Gerry Roache

Adr Mixer (Ardmore Studios)

Bron Roylance

Makeup (For Mr. Brosnan)

Charles Russell

Legal Services

Pat Ryder

Electrician

Amanda J Scarano

Production Supervisor

Ger Scully

Wardrobe Supervisor

James Seddon

Dolby Sound Consultant

L K Shields

Legal Services

Beau St. Clair

Producer

Stefan Stankowski

Camera Operator

John Stoddart

Production Designer

Matthew Symonds

Compositing

Matthew Symonds

Digital Effects

Kevin Tayler

Adr Mixer (Pinewood Studios)

Kevin Tayler

Foley Mixer (Pinewood Studios)

Nick Thomas

Location Assistant

Christian Tobin

Trainee Props

Deirdre Tormey

Assistant Hair Stylist

David Valleau

Assistant (Mr. Ohoven)

Jean Wainwright

Assistant Accountant

Norm Wallerstein

Other

Brendan Walsh

Special Effects

Martin Walsh

Color Timer

Anne Warter

Set Production Assistant

Dave Whelan

Construction Manager

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
2002
Production Company
Angel Studios; Bank Of Ireland Group; Cine Electric, Ltd.; Cineimage; Cool Music; Fintage House; First Look Holdings; Irish Dreamtime; Marsh Inc.; Pinewood Studios, Ltd.; Reelsound Ltd; Sapex; Sargent Disc, Ltd.; Sony Pictures Scoring Stage; Technicolor; United Artists Films
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM ); DeAPlaneta; Hoyts Distribution; MGM Distribution Company; MGM Home Entertainment; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Monopole Pathe Films Ag; PathT International; Ster-Kinekor; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
Ardmore Studios, Dublin, Ireland

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m

Articles

Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)


Sir Alan Bates, the versatile British actor, who held a distinguished career on both stage and screen, via a string of outstanding roles in both classical (Shakespeare, Chekhov, Ibsen) and contemporary (Pinter, Osborne, Stoppard) drama, died of pancreatic cancer on December 27th in London. He was 69.

Born Alan Arthur Bates on February 17th, 1934 in Derbyshire, England, Bates was the son of amateur musicians who wanted their son to become a concert pianist, but the young man had other ambitions, bluntly declaring to his parents that he had his sights set on an acting career when he was still in secondary school. He eventually earned a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, but had his career briefly interrupted with a two-year stint in the Royal Air Force. Soon after his discharge, Bates immediately joined the new English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre and by 1955 he had found steady stage work in London's West End theatre district.

The following year, Bates made a notable mark in English theatre circles when he starred as Cliff Lewis in John Osborne's charging drama about a disaffected, working-class British youth in Look Back in Anger. Bates' enormous stage presence along with his brooding good looks and youthfulness (he was only 22 at the time of the play's run) made him a star and promised great things for his future.

Four years later, Bates made a solid film debut in Tony Richardson's The Entertainer (1960) as the son of a failing seaside entertainer, played by Sir Laurence Olivier. Yet it would be his next two films that would leave an indelible impression in '60s British cinema; Bryan Forbes' Whistle Down the Wind (1961) and John Schlesinger's A Kind of Loving (1962). Bates' performances as a murderer on the lam who finds solace at a farm house in the company of children in the former, and a young working-class husband who struggles with his identity in a loveless marriage in the latter, were such finely nuanced portrayals of loners coping with an oppressive social order that he struck a chord with both audiences and critics alike. Soon, Bates was considered a key actor in the "angry young men" movement of the decade that included Albert Finney and Tom Courtney.

For the next ten years, Bates simply moved from strength to strength as he chose film roles that both highlighted his range and raised his stock as an international celebrity: reprising his stage role as the brutish thug Mick in the film adaptation of Harold Pinter's The Caretaker (1963); starring alongside Anthony Quinn as the impressionable young writer Basil in Zorba the Greek (1964); the raffish charmer Jos who falls in love with Lynn Redgrave in the mod comedy Georgy Girl; the bemused young soldier who falls in love with a young mental patient (a radiantly young Genevieve Bujold) in the subdued anti-was satire King of Hearts (both 1966); reuniting with director Schlesinger again in the effective period drama Far from the Madding Crowd (1967); a Russian Jew falsely accused of murder in John Frankenheimer's The Fixer (1968, remarkably, his only Oscar nomination); as Rupert, the freethinking fellow who craves love and understanding in Ken Russell's superb Women in Love (1969); playing Vershinin in Sir Laurence Olivier's underrated The Three Sisters (1970); opposite Julie Christie in Joseph Losey's tale of forbidden love The Go-Between (1971); and his moving, near-tragic performance as Bri, a father who struggles daily to maintain his sanity while raising a mentally disabled daughter in the snarking black comedy A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (1972).

Bates would slow down his film work, concentrating on the stage for the next few years, including a Tony award winning turn on Broadway for his role in Butley (1972), but he reemerged strongly in the late '70s in three good films: a conniving womanizer in The Shout; Jill Clayburgh's love interest in Paul Mazursky's hit An Unmarried Woman (1978); and as Rudge, Bette Midler's overbearing manager in The Rose (1979).

By the '80s, Bates filled out somewhat physically, but his now burly presence looked just right in some quality roles: as the notorious spy, Guy Burgess, in John Schlesinger's acclaimed mini-series An Englishman Abroad (1983); a lonely homosexual who cares for his incarcerated lovers' dog in the charming comedy We think the World of You (1988); and a superb Claudius in Franco Zeffirelli's Hamlet (1990).

Tragically, Bates lost his son Tristan to an asthma attack in 1990; and lost his wife, actress Victoria Ward, in 1992. This led to too few film roles for the next several years, although he remained quite active on stage and television. However, just recently, Bates has had some choice moments on the silver screen, most notably as the butler Mr. Jennings in Robert Altman's murder mystery Gosford Park (2001); and scored a great comic coup as a gun-toting, flag-waving Hollywood has-been in a very broad satire about the Canadian movie industry Hollywood North (2003). Also, theatre fans had a treat when Bates appeared on Broadway last year to critical acclaim (and won a second Tony award) for his portrayal of an impoverished 19th century Russian nobleman in Fortune's Fool (2002). Most deservedly, he was knighted earlier this year for his fine contributions as an actor in all major mediums. Sir Alan Bates is survived by two brothers Martin and Jon, son Benedick and a granddaughter.

by Michael T. Toole
Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)

Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)

Sir Alan Bates, the versatile British actor, who held a distinguished career on both stage and screen, via a string of outstanding roles in both classical (Shakespeare, Chekhov, Ibsen) and contemporary (Pinter, Osborne, Stoppard) drama, died of pancreatic cancer on December 27th in London. He was 69. Born Alan Arthur Bates on February 17th, 1934 in Derbyshire, England, Bates was the son of amateur musicians who wanted their son to become a concert pianist, but the young man had other ambitions, bluntly declaring to his parents that he had his sights set on an acting career when he was still in secondary school. He eventually earned a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, but had his career briefly interrupted with a two-year stint in the Royal Air Force. Soon after his discharge, Bates immediately joined the new English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre and by 1955 he had found steady stage work in London's West End theatre district. The following year, Bates made a notable mark in English theatre circles when he starred as Cliff Lewis in John Osborne's charging drama about a disaffected, working-class British youth in Look Back in Anger. Bates' enormous stage presence along with his brooding good looks and youthfulness (he was only 22 at the time of the play's run) made him a star and promised great things for his future. Four years later, Bates made a solid film debut in Tony Richardson's The Entertainer (1960) as the son of a failing seaside entertainer, played by Sir Laurence Olivier. Yet it would be his next two films that would leave an indelible impression in '60s British cinema; Bryan Forbes' Whistle Down the Wind (1961) and John Schlesinger's A Kind of Loving (1962). Bates' performances as a murderer on the lam who finds solace at a farm house in the company of children in the former, and a young working-class husband who struggles with his identity in a loveless marriage in the latter, were such finely nuanced portrayals of loners coping with an oppressive social order that he struck a chord with both audiences and critics alike. Soon, Bates was considered a key actor in the "angry young men" movement of the decade that included Albert Finney and Tom Courtney. For the next ten years, Bates simply moved from strength to strength as he chose film roles that both highlighted his range and raised his stock as an international celebrity: reprising his stage role as the brutish thug Mick in the film adaptation of Harold Pinter's The Caretaker (1963); starring alongside Anthony Quinn as the impressionable young writer Basil in Zorba the Greek (1964); the raffish charmer Jos who falls in love with Lynn Redgrave in the mod comedy Georgy Girl; the bemused young soldier who falls in love with a young mental patient (a radiantly young Genevieve Bujold) in the subdued anti-was satire King of Hearts (both 1966); reuniting with director Schlesinger again in the effective period drama Far from the Madding Crowd (1967); a Russian Jew falsely accused of murder in John Frankenheimer's The Fixer (1968, remarkably, his only Oscar nomination); as Rupert, the freethinking fellow who craves love and understanding in Ken Russell's superb Women in Love (1969); playing Vershinin in Sir Laurence Olivier's underrated The Three Sisters (1970); opposite Julie Christie in Joseph Losey's tale of forbidden love The Go-Between (1971); and his moving, near-tragic performance as Bri, a father who struggles daily to maintain his sanity while raising a mentally disabled daughter in the snarking black comedy A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (1972). Bates would slow down his film work, concentrating on the stage for the next few years, including a Tony award winning turn on Broadway for his role in Butley (1972), but he reemerged strongly in the late '70s in three good films: a conniving womanizer in The Shout; Jill Clayburgh's love interest in Paul Mazursky's hit An Unmarried Woman (1978); and as Rudge, Bette Midler's overbearing manager in The Rose (1979). By the '80s, Bates filled out somewhat physically, but his now burly presence looked just right in some quality roles: as the notorious spy, Guy Burgess, in John Schlesinger's acclaimed mini-series An Englishman Abroad (1983); a lonely homosexual who cares for his incarcerated lovers' dog in the charming comedy We think the World of You (1988); and a superb Claudius in Franco Zeffirelli's Hamlet (1990). Tragically, Bates lost his son Tristan to an asthma attack in 1990; and lost his wife, actress Victoria Ward, in 1992. This led to too few film roles for the next several years, although he remained quite active on stage and television. However, just recently, Bates has had some choice moments on the silver screen, most notably as the butler Mr. Jennings in Robert Altman's murder mystery Gosford Park (2001); and scored a great comic coup as a gun-toting, flag-waving Hollywood has-been in a very broad satire about the Canadian movie industry Hollywood North (2003). Also, theatre fans had a treat when Bates appeared on Broadway last year to critical acclaim (and won a second Tony award) for his portrayal of an impoverished 19th century Russian nobleman in Fortune's Fool (2002). Most deservedly, he was knighted earlier this year for his fine contributions as an actor in all major mediums. Sir Alan Bates is survived by two brothers Martin and Jon, son Benedick and a granddaughter. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 13, 2002

Limited Release in United States December 13, 2002

Released in United States on Video April 15, 2003

Released in United States January 2003

Shown at Palm Springs International Film Festival January 9-20, 2003.

Released in United States Winter December 13, 2002

Limited Release in United States December 13, 2002

Released in United States on Video April 15, 2003

Released in United States January 2003 (Shown at Palm Springs International Film Festival January 9-20, 2003.)