Mumford


1h 52m 1999

Brief Synopsis

The story of a young psychologist who hangs out his shingle in a small town that, curiously, is also called Mumford. Dr. Mumford is soon dispensing no-nonsense therapy to an array of quirky locals who are won over by his genuine attentiveness and surprising frankness. Mumford's unusual style opens n

Film Details

Also Known As
Dr. Mumford - Inogjncia Ou Culpa?
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Santa Rosa, California, USA; California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m

Synopsis

The story of a young psychologist who hangs out his shingle in a small town that, curiously, is also called Mumford. Dr. Mumford is soon dispensing no-nonsense therapy to an array of quirky locals who are won over by his genuine attentiveness and surprising frankness. Mumford's unusual style opens new possibilities, lightens hearts darkened by old secrets, and sparks romances in unlikely places. Although he's been in town for only four months, he's already the most popular psychologist around. But the doctor could use some help of his own, when another doctor begins to question Dr. Mumford's credentials. As accusations fly, the town rallies to their doctor's defense.

Crew

Daniel Albanese

Scenic Artist

Chase Allen

Stunts

Pete Anthony

Music Conductor

Alison Armstrong

Visual Effects

James Ashwill

Foley Mixer

Colleen Atwood

Costume Designer

John Banuelos

Sound

Iris C. Barbarino

Driver

James A Barbarino

Driver

Thomas A Barowe

Other

Timothy A Bateman

Driver

Brian Battles

Visual Effects

Alison Bayer

Assistant

James Beaumonte

Grip

Dennis D Becker

Other

Michael Becker

Costumes

Dan Bell

Stunts

Matthew Bell

Animator

Jay Bennett

Song

Tina Bennett

Assistant Production Coordinator

Steph Benseman

Unit Production Manager

J Chuck Biagio

Best Boy

Deborah 'cha' Blevins

Costume Supervisor

Jason P Boccaleoni

Electrician

Lisa Bock

Production Assistant

Ron Bolanowski

Special Effects Coordinator

Lisa Bonaccorso

Camera

Judith Bouley

Location Casting

Brigitte Bourque

Visual Effects

Pete Bowman

Grip

Michael Boyd

Song

Billy Bragg

Song Performer

Billy Bragg

Song

Bill Brashier

Projectionist

Neil Brockbank

Song Performer

B W Brown

Foley Editor

Jonathan Brown

Steadicam Operator

Jonathan Brown

Camera

Malcolm Brown

Camera Operator

Richard L Carden

Dolly Grip

Cristina Christian

Accounting Assistant

Richard Clot

Construction Coordinator

Ken Coomer

Song

Ericson Core

Director Of Photography

Peter T Crosman

Visual Effects Supervisor

Charlie Croughwell

Stunt Coordinator

John Cucci

Foley Artist

Alan Curreri

Scenic Artist

Andrea D'amico

Executive Producer

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Resha M Debaca

Location Casting

Brad Dechter

Original Music

Catherine Deprima

Special Thanks To

Christpher Desmond

Other

Jamie Dismore

Assistant

Daniel Dobson

Video Playback

Lori Dovi

Other

Kim Drummond

Dialogue Editor

Jason R Dudek

Production Assistant

Susan Dudek

Dialogue Editor

Stephen P Dunn

Assistant Director

Stephen P Dunn

Coproducer

Christine Renee Dye

Production Assistant

Kira Edmunds

Assistant Sound Editor

Tom Ehline

Other

Ryan W Eldred

Editor

Pamela Ellington

Accounting Assistant

Leonard Engelman

Makeup Artist

Jane Estocin

Accountant

Amy Beth Feldman

Assistant Set Decorator

Sean Flood

Grip

Mark Franco

Digital Effects Supervisor

Jim Frear

Transportation Co-Captain

Laura Freeman

Scenic Artist

Ellen Freund

Property Master

Aida Gaboyan

Assistant

Elise Ganz

Other

Wendy J Gayner

Other

Linda Goldstein-knowlton

Coproducer

Galen Goodpaster

Assistant Sound Editor

W Steven Graham

Art Director

Richard Grant

Other

Shai Greenburg

Assistant

Robert Grieve

Sound Editor

D Scott Guthrie

Driver

Woody Guthrie

Song

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

Corey Harris

Song

Craig Harris

Production Assistant

Kimberly Harris

Adr Supervisor

Jim Hill

Music Producer

James Newton Howard

Original Music

James Newton Howard

Music

Jon Hutman

Coproducer

Jon Hutman

Production Designer

Steve Imbler

Transportation Captain

Barbara Jenichen

Wardrobe

James E Johnson

Lighting

Kay Jordan

Accountant

Jason Joseph

Apprentice

Susannah Julien

Assistant

Robert Kaiser

Color Timer

Jo Ann Kane

Music

Robert Karpman

Location Manager

Lawrence Kasdan

Screenplay

Lawrence Kasdan

Producer

Mike Kaufman

Sound

David Kebo

Production Assistant

Ian C Kelly

Other

D Kendell

Scenic Artist

Mitchell Kenney

Costumes

Stephanie Kime

Assistant Director

Marion Kolsby

Assistant Art Director

Karen Kutcka

Production Manager

James R Kwiatkowski

Scenic Artist

John Lacy

Electrician

Gemma Lamana

Photography

Rick Lambert

Swing Gang

Carolyn Lassek

Assistant Property Master

Woody Lawhon

Other

Jerry Leiber

Song

Linda Lew

Foley Recordist

Alan Lieberman

Key Grip

Carol Littleton

Editor

Kenneth Littleton

Digital Effects Supervisor

Lawrence Littleton

Digital Effects Supervisor

Robert Loranger

Swing Gang

Lyle Lovett

Song Performer

Lyle Lovett

Song

Nick Lowe

Song Performer

Nick Lowe

Song

David Lucarelli

Adr

Angie Luckey

Assistant Editor

Ivy K Lukas

Production Assistant

Gary Remal Malkin

Song

Johnny M Martin

Stunts

Gail Martin-sheridan

Production Accountant

Robert Bruce Mccleery

Lighting Technician

Gary Mcclendon

Electrician

Stephen Mcgehee

Other

Stephen Mcnally

Scenic Artist

Brandon Mcnaughton

Visual Effects

Sharon Mcvey-rude

Hair Stylist

Nicolas A Meeks

On-Set Dresser

Morgan Anne Metzger

Production Assistant

Marilyn Michel

Location Casting

William Mings

Animator

Brian Minzlaff

Electrician

Keb Mo

Song Performer

Keb Mo

Song

Michael Molnar

Grip

Daniel P Moore

Video Assist/Playback

Daniela Moore

Costumes

John Murray

Foley Editor

Diana Myers

Assistant Location Manager

Gregory A Nahem

Scenic Artist

Boone Narr

Animal Trainer

Dan O'connell

Foley Artist

Kevin O'connell

Sound Mixer

Donna O'neal

Set Costumer

Charles Okun

Producer

David Olson

Music Editor

Orlando Orona

Grip

John Panzarella

Location Manager

Richard Perkins

Assistant Editor

Peter Pilafian

Camera Operator

Kevin Potter

Assistant

Phil Poulos

Casting Associate

Paul Prenderville

Assistant Director

John Patrick Pritchett

Sound Mixer

Gregory Pyros

Other

Susan Pyros

Art Director

Liz Radley

Video

Medel Ramos

Lighting

Manish Raval

Music Supervisor

Josephine Reil

Art Department

Russell J Reilly

Best Boy Grip

David Renaud

Stunts

Charlene Richards

Adr Mixer

Tom Richardson

Other

Marianne Riegg

Costumes

David M Roberts

Boom Operator

David Rodriguez

Song

Lauren Ross

Location Manager

Beth A Rubino

Set Decorator

Greg P. Russell

Sound Mixer

Monique Salvato

Assistant Sound Editor

Paul Santoni

Assistant Camera Operator

Grant Schmitz

Rerecording

Bill Schnee

Sound Mixer

Bob Seger

Song Performer

Bob Seger

Song

Dan Sharp

Other

James R Shelton

Key Grip

Jennifer Shull

Casting

Amy Smith

Costumes

Mary Beth Smith

Negative Cutting

Sandra Lisa Smith

Props

Kevin Springer

Other

Scott Sproule

Stunts

Film Details

Also Known As
Dr. Mumford - Inogjncia Ou Culpa?
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Santa Rosa, California, USA; California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m

Articles

Robert Stack, 1919-2003


Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84.

Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling.

Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger.

Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen.

His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942).

After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958).

Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name.

Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980).

Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles.

by Michael T. Toole
Robert Stack, 1919-2003

Robert Stack, 1919-2003

Robert Stack, the tough, forceful actor who had a solid career in films before achieving his greatest success playing crime fighter Eliot Ness in the '60s television series The Untouchables (1959-63) and later as host of the long-running Unsolved Mysteries(1987-2002), died on May 14 of heart failure in his Los Angeles home. He was 84. Stack was born in Los Angeles on January 13, 1919 to a well-to-do family but his parents divorced when he was a year old. At age three, he moved with his mother to Paris, where she studied singing. They returned to Los Angeles when he was seven, by then French was his native language and was not taught English until he started schooling. Naturally athletic, Stack was still in high school when he became a national skeet-shooting champion and top-flight polo player. He soon was giving lessons on shooting to such top Hollywood luminaries as Clark Gable and Carol Lombard, and found himself on the polo field with some notable movie moguls like Darryl Zanuck and Walter Wanger. Stack enrolled in the University of Southern California, where he took some drama courses, and was on the Polo team, but it wasn't long before some influential people in the film industry took notice of his classic good looks, and lithe physique. Soon, his Hollywood connections got him on a film set at Paramount, a screen test, and eventually, his first lead in a picture, opposite Deanna Durbin in First Love (1939). Although he was only 20, Stack's natural delivery and boyish charm made him a natural for the screen. His range grew with some meatier parts in the next few years, especially noteworthy were his roles as the young Nazi sympathizer in Frank Borzage's chilling The Mortal Storm (1940), with James Stewart, and as the Polish flier who woos a married Carole Lombard in Ernst Lubitsch's To Be or Not to Be (1942). After serving as a gunnery officer in the Navy during World War II, Stack returned to the screen, and found a few interesting roles over the next ten years: giving Elizabeth Taylor her first screen kiss in Robert Thorp's A Date With Judy (1948); the leading role as an American bullfighter in Budd Boetticher's The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951); and as a pilot in William Wellman's The High and the Mighty (1954), starring John Wayne. However, Stack saved his best dramatic performances for Douglas Sirk in two knockout films: as a self-destructive alcoholic in Douglas Sirk's Written on the Wind (1956), for which he received an Academy Award nomination for supporting actor; and sympathetically portraying a fallen World War I pilot ace who is forced to do barnstorming stunts for mere survival in Tarnished Angels (1958). Despite proving his capabilities as a solid actor in these roles, front rank stardom oddly eluded Stack at this point. That all changed when Stack gave television a try. The result was the enormously popular series, The Untouchables (1959-63). This exciting crime show about the real-life Prohibition-era crime-fighter Eliot Ness and his G-men taking on the Chicago underworld was successful in its day for several reasons: its catchy theme music, florid violence (which caused quite a sensation in its day), taut narration by Walter Winchell, and of course, Stack's trademark staccato delivery and strong presence. It all proved so popular that the series ran for four years, earned an Emmy for Stack in 1960, and made him a household name. Stack would return to television in the late '60s, with the The Name of the Game (1968-71), and a string of made-for-television movies throughout the '70s. His career perked up again when Steven Spielberg cast him in his big budget comedy 1941 (1979) as General Joe Stillwell. The film surprised many viewers as few realized Stack was willing to spoof his granite-faced stoicism, but it won him over many new fans, and his dead-pan intensity would be used to perfect comic effect the following year as Captain Rex Kramer (who can forget the sight of him beating up Hare Krishnas at the airport?) in David and Jerry Zucker's wonderful spoof of disaster flicks, Airplane! (1980). Stack's activity would be sporadic throughout the remainder of his career, but he returned to television, as the host of enormously popular Unsolved Mysteries (1987-2002), and played himself in Lawrence Kasden's comedy-drama Mumford (1999). He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Rosemarie Bowe Stack, a former actress, and two children, Elizabeth and Charles, both of Los Angeles. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 24, 1999

Released in United States on Video April 18, 2000

Released in United States September 1999

Shown at San Sebastian International Film Festival (opening night) September 16-25, 1999.

Shown at Toronto International Film Festival (Gala) September 9-18, 1999.

Began shooting April 6, 1998.

Completed shooting June 24, 1998.

Released in United States on Video April 18, 2000

Released in United States September 1999 (Shown at San Sebastian International Film Festival (opening night) September 16-25, 1999.)

Released in United States September 1999 (Shown at Toronto International Film Festival (Gala) September 9-18, 1999.)

Released in United States Fall September 24, 1999