End of Days


2h 1999

Brief Synopsis

Jericho Cane, a beaten down ex-cop, wakes up to another day, oblivious to the struggle that he soon must face. His job as a security specialist alongside his partner Chicago has become a tireless routine of seedy surveillance jobs, and since the death of his wife and child, everything in life which

Film Details

Also Known As
Fin des temps, La, La Fin des temps
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Production Company
Centropolis Effects Llc; Chandler Group; Cinesite Europe, Ltd.; Greenberg/Schluter Inc.; Hunter/Gratzner Industries Inc; Knb Efx Group, Inc.; New Deal Studios, Inc.; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Rhythm & Hues Studios; Stan Winston Studios; Todd-Ao; Universal Pictures; Village Roadshow Greece
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures; Buena Vista International; Gaga Communications (Parent); Kinepolis Film Distribution; Metropolitan Filmexport; RCV Distribution; Sam Film; Toho-Towa Company; Universal Pictures; Universal Pictures Home Entertainment; Village Roadshow Limited; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Synopsis

Jericho Cane, a beaten down ex-cop, wakes up to another day, oblivious to the struggle that he soon must face. His job as a security specialist alongside his partner Chicago has become a tireless routine of seedy surveillance jobs, and since the death of his wife and child, everything in life which once held any meaning to him is now gone. Following a bizarre confrontation with a crazed homeless man warning him of impending doom, Cane rescues a young woman, Christine York from attackers who have invaded her home. He soon finds himself drawn into a heart-stopping game of cat and mouse, as he realizes that she is the key to a supernatural force of terror, born of prophecy long ago foretold. For she is the unwitting object of desire of what deceptively appears to be just a man, but is in fact the ultimate embodiment of evil--Satan. Now, as the world stands on the brink of the new millennium, it is up to Cane to protect Christine--and all mankind--from witnessing the end of days.

Crew

Marc Abraham

Executive Producer

Gary Abrahamian

3-D Animator (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Richard Alonzo

Makeup Application (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creatio)

Kokayi Ampah

Supervising Location Manager

Tim Angulo

Visual Effects Director Of Photography (The Chandler Group/Visual Effects Photography)

Pete Anthony

Original Music

Reginald Arvizu

Song ("Camel Song")

Christopher Assells

Sound Effects Editor

Kenneth Au

2-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Don Baker

Visual Effects Supervisor (The Chandler Group/Visual Effects Photography)

Bill Basso

Key Artist (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creatio)

Jennifer M Bell

Key Hair Stylist

David Beneke

Art/Mold Technical Department (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creation)

Stacey Beneville

Assistant Director (New York Crew)

Frank Bennett

Original Music

Lee Berger

Executive Producer (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Chris Bergman

2-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Armyan Bernstein

Producer

Greg Berry

Set Designer

Scott Beverly

Other

Kamar Bitar

Production Staff (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Limp Bizkit

Song Performer ("Crushed")

Thomas Bliss

Executive Producer

Greg M Boettcher

Model Maker (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniature/Effects)

Rick Bongiovanni

Lab Technician (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Bill Borden

Producer

Mauro Borrelli

Illustrator

Jennifer Bourne

Digital Artist (Centropolis Effects/Additional Visual Effects/Computer Generated Imagery)

Darin Bouyssou

Art/Mold Technical Department (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creation)

Greg Bradner

Other

Conrad F Brink

Special Effects Coordinator (New York Crew)

Jeffrey S Brink

Special Effects Coordinator (New York Crew)

Jim Brockett

Animal Trainer

Dan Brodzik

Other

Mark A Brown

Other

Megan Bryant

Supervisor

Cheryl Budgett

Supervisor

Jackie Burch

Casting

Cathy Burns

Other

Norman Cabrera

Sculptor (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Connie Cadwell

Other

Robb Cadzow

Other

Stephen S. Campanelli

Camera Operator

Stephen S. Campanelli

Steadicam Operator

Colin Campbell

2-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Gene S Cantamessa

Production Sound Mixer

Tom Carlson

Music Editor

Tamara Carlson-woodard

Lab Technician (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Ozzie Carmona

Digital Artist (Centropolis Effects/Additional Visual Effects/Computer Generated Imagery)

Teresa Carriker-thayer

Art Director (New York Crew)

Al Cerullo

Other

Al Cerullo

Helicopter Pilot

Al Cerullo

Helicopter Pilot

Pamela Choules

Visual Effects Editor

Keith Claridge

Visual Effects Engineer (The Chandler Group/Visual Effects Photography)

Paul Clemente

Lead Model Maker (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniature/Effects)

Charlie Clouser

Song ("Superbeast")

Nat King Cole

Song Performer ("The Christmas Song")

David Collier

Other

Jason Collins

Lab Technician (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Chris Consani

Digital Effects Painter (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Mark S Constance

Assistant Director

Charles Cook

Other

Robert Cribbett

Supervisor

Gino Crognale

Sculptor (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Bing Crosby

Song ("God Rest Ye Merry Gentleman (Traditional)")

Jeffrey Cupernell

Model Maker (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniature/Effects)

Seth Curlin

Model Maker (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniature/Effects)

Charlie Daboub

Art Director

Jonathon Davis

Song ("Camel Song")

Steve M Davison

Stunt Coordinator

Jeff Dawn

Makeup Department Head

Paul Deason

Unit Production Manager

Paul Deason

Co-Producer

John Debney

Music Composer

Sara Decesare

Visual Effects Production Manager (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Brad Dechter

Original Music

Mike Delaney

Model Maker (Stirber Visual Network Inc/Subway Miniature Sequence/Church Pyrotechnic Effects)

Aaron Dem

Head Of Production (Centropolis Effects/Additional Visual Effects/Computer Generated Imagery)

Brian Demsky

Lab Technician (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Robert Deschane

Adr Mixer

John Desjardin

Visual Effects Supervisor (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Richard Devinki

Production Coordinator (Beacon Pictures)

Ivan Dewolf

3-D Digital Animator (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Lou Diaz

Art/Mold Technical Department (Stan Winston Studio/ Creature Design/Creation)

Mariano Agostino Diaz

Illustrator

Bill Dietrich

Supervisor

Lulie Diorio

Model Maker (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniature/Effects)

Justin Ditter

Lab Technician (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Duke Dixon

Other

James Doe

Storyboard Artist

Alon Dori

Art/Mold Technical Department (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creation)

John J. Downey

Special Effects Gang Boss

Roy Downey

Pyro Crew Chief (Stirber Visual Network Inc/Subway Miniature Sequence/Church Pyrotechnic Effects)

Jon Doyle

Digital Artist (Centropolis Effects/Additional Visual Effects/Computer Generated Imagery)

Mitchell S Drain

Digital Effects Supervisor (Centropolis Effects/Additional Visual Effects/Computer Generated Imagery)

Eric Durst

Visual Effects Supervisor

Fred Durst

Song ("Crushed")

Jeff Edwards

Puppeteer

Jeff Edwards

Key Animatronic Design (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creation)

William M Elvin

1st Assistant Director

Gregory Elwood

2-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Ron Epstein

Special Effects Technician

Jelena Erceg

Supervisor

Anders Ericson

3-D Animator (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Richard A. F. Ewan

Other

Conny Fauser

Digital Effects Supervisor (Centropolis Effects/Additional Visual Effects/Computer Generated Imagery)

Val Favela

Model Maker (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniature/Effects)

Mike Ferris

Additional Camera Operator

Gary Fettis

Set Decorator

Greg Figiel

Key Artist (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creatio)

Forest P Fischer

Model Crew Chief (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniatures/Effects)

Julie Fischer

Digital Production Manager (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Kelly Fischer

2-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Paula D Fischer

Special Effects Administrator

Scott R. Fisher

Special Effects Coordinator

Thomas L. Fisher

Special Effects Coordinator

Gail Fitzgibbons

Costume Supervisor (New York Crew)

Anna Foerster

Director Of Photography (The Chandler Group/Visual Effects Photography)

Mark Franco

President (Centropolis Effects/Additional Visual Effects/Computer Generated Imagery)

David Freund

Model Maker (Stirber Visual Network Inc/Subway Miniature Sequence/Church Pyrotechnic Effects)

Bruce Fuller

Sculptor (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Shannon Blake Gans

Church Miniatures/Effects (Hunter-Gratzner Industries), Miniature Effects

Pete Gerard

Mechanical Effects (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniature/Effects)

Carrie Gerlach

Publicity

Scott Gershin

Sound Effects Editor

Nerses Gezalyan

Foley Mixer

Scott Giegler

3-D Digital Animator (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Hector Gika

Sound Effects Editor

Ronald D. Goldstein

Special Effects Gang Boss

Henry Gonzalez

Model Maker (Stirber Visual Network Inc/Subway Miniature Sequence/Church Pyrotechnic Effects)

Roy Goode

Pyro Crew (Stirber Visual Network Inc/Subway Miniature Sequence/Church Pyrotechnic Effects)

Bradley M Goodman

Post-Production Supervisor

Collin Grant

Storyboard Artist

Matthew Gratzner

Miniature Effects Supervisor (Hunter-Gratzner Industries)

Matthew Gratzner

Church Miniatures/Effects

Abra Grupp

Compositor (Centropolis Effects/Additional Visual Effects/Computer Generated Imagery)

Jeff Gullo

Editor

David Gutman

2-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Lars W Hagen

Model Maker (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniature/Effects)

Brian Kelly Hahn

Mechanical Effects (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniature/Effects)

James Hall

Lab Technician (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Laura Hanigan

2-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Meg Harders

Digital Effects Painter (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Walid Harmoush

Other

Michael Haro

Location Manager

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

Laura Harris

Dialogue Editor

Douglas Harsch

Supervisor

Steve Hartman

Lab Technician (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Geoff Harvey

3-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Chiz Hasegawa

Production Staff (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Rich Haugen

Puppeteer

Rich Haugen

Key Animatronic Design (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creatio)

Jennifer Hawk

Other

Angela Heald

Production Supervisor

Matt Heimlich

Puppeteer

Matt Heimlich

Key Animatronic Design (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creation)

John Heller

Inferno Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Chad Hellmuth

Production Coordinator (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Trevor Hensley

Key Artist (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creation)

Trevor Hensley

Puppeteer

Patrick Hinkle

Model Maker (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniature/Effects)

Bryan Hirota

Digital Effects Producer (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Alec Hirschfeld

Additional Camera Operator (New York Crew)

Al Hobbs

Set Designer

David Hoffner

Song ("Little Yurt On The Prairie")

Grady Holder

Art/Mold Technical Department (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creation)

Richard J Holland

Production Designer

Caleb Howard

3-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Jen Howard

2-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Scott Humphrey

Song ("Superbeast")

Steve Humphrey

Other

Ian Hunter

Church Miniatures/Effects (Hunter-Gratzner Industries)

Ian Hunter

Visual Effects Art Director

Peter Hyams

Westcam Operator

Peter Hyams

Director Of Photography

Garrett Immel

Sculptor (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Sean Hyun In Lee

2d Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Christopher Ivins

2-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Leigh-alexandra Jacob

Other

Brian Jaecker-jones

Mechanical Effects (Hunter-Gratzner Industries/Church Miniature/Effects)

Craig Jaeger

Foley Editor

Dayne Johnson

Key Makeup

Carey Jones

Art/Mold Technical Department (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creation)

Cindy Jones

Effects Producer (Todd-Ao/Hollywood Digital-West/Additional Digital Visual Effects/Computer Generated Imagery Provider)

Mark Jurinko

Art/Mold Technical Department (Stan Winston Studio/Creature Design/Creation)

Dan Kaufman

3-D Digital Animator (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Conrad Kecher

Song ("For The Beauty Of The Earth (Traditional)")

Karen Keener

Lab Technician (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Matt Kelly

2-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Steven Kemper

Editor

Lance Kimes

Other

Jay B King

Special Effects Gang Boss

Louis Kiss

Lab Technician (Kurtzman Nicotero & Berger Efx Group/Special Make-Up Effects)

Nikita Knatz

Senior Production Illustrator

Peter C. Koczera

Digital Effects Supervisor (Todd-Ao/Hollywood Digital-West/Additional Digital Visual Effects/Computer Generated Imagery Provider)

Hoiyue Harry Lam

Supervisor

Tony Lamberti

Sound Design Editor

Lance Laspina

2-D Digital Artist (Rhythm & Hues/Visual Effects & Digital Creature)

Film Details

Also Known As
Fin des temps, La, La Fin des temps
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1999
Production Company
Centropolis Effects Llc; Chandler Group; Cinesite Europe, Ltd.; Greenberg/Schluter Inc.; Hunter/Gratzner Industries Inc; Knb Efx Group, Inc.; New Deal Studios, Inc.; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Rhythm & Hues Studios; Stan Winston Studios; Todd-Ao; Universal Pictures; Village Roadshow Greece
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures; Buena Vista International; Gaga Communications (Parent); Kinepolis Film Distribution; Metropolitan Filmexport; RCV Distribution; Sam Film; Toho-Towa Company; Universal Pictures; Universal Pictures Home Entertainment; Village Roadshow Limited; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Articles

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger


ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Tcm Remembers - Rod Steiger

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 24, 1999

Released in United States on Video April 18, 2000

Music video director Marcus Nispel was previously attached to direct.

Began shooting November 21, 1998.

Completed shooting May 3, 1999.

Released in United States on Video April 18, 2000

Released in United States Fall November 24, 1999