The Talented Mr. Ripley


2h 19m 1999

Brief Synopsis

A con artist infiltrates a playboy's glamorous life.

Film Details

Also Known As
El talento de Mr. Ripley, Mr. Ripley en man med många talanger, Talented Mr. Ripley, talentueux Mr. Ripley
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Suspense/Mystery
Adaptation
Crime
Period
Thriller
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Tuscany, Italy; Cinecitta Studios, Rome, Italy; Naples, Italy; Sicily, Italy; Venice, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 19m

Synopsis

To be young and carefree amid the blue waters and idyllic landscape of sun-drenched Italy in the late 1950s; that's la dolce vita Tom Ripley craves--and Dickie Greenleaf leads. When Dickie's father, a wealthy ship builder, asks Tom to bring his errant playboy son back home to America, Dickie and his beautiful ex-patriate girlfriend, Marge Sherwood, never suspect the dangerous extremes to which Ripley will go to make their lifestyle his own. After all, it's better to be a fake somebody than a real nobody.

Crew

Keith Adams

Location Assistant

Eden Ahbez

Song

Alessandro Alberti

Assistant Art Director

Tom Allen

Property Master

Andrea Alunni

Assistant Location Manager

David Ambrosi

Stunts

Steve Andrews

Associate Producer

Steve Andrews

Assistant Director

Martin Anscombe

Special Thanks To

David Arch

Song Performer

Gianni Arduini

Assistant Director

Robin Aspland

Song Performer

Johann Sebastian Bach

Music

Nena Balzari

Special Thanks To

Don Banks

Boom Operator

Francesco Barbieri

Office Runner

Guy Barker

Song

Alan Barnes

Song Performer

Alan Barnes

Music

Sarah Beardsall

Casting

Ludwig Van Beethoven

Music

John Bell

Original Music

Romano Bellucci

Carpenter

Phil Benson

Editing

Mark Berger

Rerecording

Martin Bernstein

Other

Michael Bigger

Makeup

Agostino Bivi

Other

Alfredo Bocci

Wardrobe

Vebe Borge

Assistant Director

Alessandro Boscu

Special Thanks To

Chantal Bouiges

Special Thanks To

Ferdinando Brachetti

Special Thanks To

Anne Brault

Wardrobe Supervisor

Phil Bray

Photography

Tim Bricknell

Assistant

Jane Bridgeman

Special Thanks To

Silvano Broglia

Driver

J. C. Brotherhood

Special Effects Supervisor

Robbie Broughton

Assistant Editor

Andy Brown

Music Contractor

Rick Butler

Art Director

Sabrina Canale

Assistant

Rosanna Carbonara

Other

Renato Carosone

Song

Fratelli Cartocci

Other

Giorgio Catalano

Accountant

Alessandro Cedoloni

Other

Giancarlo Cedoloni

Other

Mauro Cedoloni

Other

Bruno Cesari

Set Decorator

Carolyn Choa

Other

Sharon Choa

Special Thanks To

Federica Ciciarelli

Assistant Director

Francesca Cingolani

Transportation Coordinator

Alessandra Cinque

Special Thanks To

Roberto Citran

Special Thanks To

Violetta Coata-sternberg

Special Thanks To

Mariano Colace

Carpenter

Remo Colace

Carpenter

Francesco Colangeli

Electrician

Dino Colasanti

Driver

Stephanie Comer

Assistant

Kyrsten Mate Comoglio

Sound Effects Editor

Ben Conrad

Foley Mixer

Richard Conway

Special Effects Supervisor

Sam Conway

Special Effects Coordinator

Rodolfo Corsato

Special Thanks To

Marcia Crayford

Other

Cesare Cremonini

Special Thanks To

Bing Crosby

Song Performer

Julia Cuddihy

Assistant

Salvatore D'arco

Assistant Location Manager

Eric B Dachs

Apprentice

Douglas Dalisera

Assistant Art Director

Lara Dall'antonia

Assistant

Mauro Dalla Costa

Driver

Livia Dalla Torre

Special Thanks To

Matt Damon

Song Performer

Jack Davenport

Song Performer

Miles Davis

Song

Miles Davis

Song Performer

Roberto De Angelis

Camera

Maria De Leo

Assistant Director

Giuseppe De Luca

Swing Gang

Roberto De Luca

Wardrobe

Roberto De Nigris

Camera Operator

Gene De Paul

Song

Cristina De Rossi

Other

Claudio Del Gobbo

Grip

Elisabetta Deleonardis

Hair Stylist

Benoît Delhomme

Dp/Cinematographer

Benoît Delhomme

Director Of Photography

Dominique Des Langes

Assistant Location Manager

Massimiliano Dessena

Grip

Marco Di Francesco

Assistant

Barbara Di Girolamo

Production Assistant

Adriano Di Lorenzo

Other

Paolo Di Stefano

Electrician

Ales Diabac

Art Department

Chris Dibble

Music

Iain Dixon

Music

Iain Dixon

Song Performer

Francis B K Dokyi

Office Runner

Lorenzo Dominici

Carpenter

Final Draft

Special Thanks To

Nick Drew

Visual Effects

Dianne Dreyer

Script Supervisor

Gordon Driver

Special Thanks To

Tommaso Dubla

Other

Massimiliano Duranti

Hair Assistant

Deb Dyer

Accounting Assistant

Polly Earnshaw

Makeup Assistant

Tina Earnshaw

Makeup Artist

Ginevra Elkann

Video Assist/Playback

Antonello Emidi

Camera

Sandro Ercolini

Other

Sarah Ewing

Casting

Sergio Faina

Grip

Raffaella Fantasia

Other

Daniel Farrell

Assistant Editor

Filippo Fassetta

Assistant Director

Sylvia Fay

Extras Agent/Coordinator

John Fenner

Art Director

Malcolm Fife

Foley Editor

Rosario Fiorello

Song Performer

Alessandro Fiorito

Other

Maria Fiorito

Production Accountant

Serena Fiumi

Wardrobe

Mo Flam

Gaffer

Clarissa Flamenco

Special Thanks To

Steve Fontano

Foley

Jan Foster

Unit Production Manager

Sarajo Frieden

Special Thanks To

Antonio Gabrielli

Location Manager

Giancarlo Gabrielli

Swing Gang

Rita Gacioppo

Location Manager

Giorgio Gallani

Location Manager

Joseph Garzero

Other

Geoff Gascoyne

Stand-In

Gabriella Generosi

Wardrobe

Paola Genevese

Hair Assistant

Gianni Gentili

Electrician

Kay Georgiou

Hair Stylist

Sharon Gerussi

Special Thanks To

Adriano Giannini

Camera

W S Gilbert

Song

Aura Gilge

Sound

Dizzy Gillespie

Music

Michele Giordano

Production Coordinator

Raffaella Giovannetti

Assistant Set Decorator

Dan Gleich

Sound Effects

Mack Gordon

Song

Orlando Gough

Special Thanks To

Giampietro Grassi

Tailor

Hannah Green

Wardrobe

Giorgio Gregorini

Hair Stylist

Isobel Griffiths

Music Contractor

Sian Grigg

Makeup Artist

Storico Gucci

Special Thanks To

Steven R Hammond

Transportation Captain

Holly Hardin

Assistant Production Coordinator

Dierdre Harrison

Special Thanks To

Lorenz Hart

Song

Ruth Hasty

Assistant Editor

Ruth Hasty

Post-Production Supervisor

Bernard Hearn

Property Master

Sam Hencher

Art Department

Jeremy Henderson

Special Thanks To

Jonathan Herman

Assistant

Patricia Highsmith

Source Material

Dean Hood

Production Accountant

William Horberg

Producer

Pat Jackson

Sound Editor

Vanessa Jacobs

Assistant Production Coordinator

Sondra James

Voice Casting

Harry Jarman

Art Department

Allan Jenkins

Music

Gary Jones

Costume Designer

Lynn Kamern

Unit Production Manager

Pete King

Song

Miura Kite

Casting Associate

Petr Komrzy

Effects Coordinator

Vit Komrzy

Effects Coordinator

Ronna Kress

Casting Associate

Brigitte Lacombe

Special Thanks To

Jude Law

Song Performer

William Lee

Song

Iris H. Lemos

Costumes

Benito Leonardi

Carpenter

Sabina Lepri

Art Assistant

Mark Levinson

Adr Supervisor

Fabrizio Lombardo

Special Thanks To

Maurizio Lorenzetti

Other

Dennis Lowe

Visual Effects Supervisor

Laura Luchetti

Other

Amy Lynn

Assistant Director

Luciano Magagnini

Swing Gang

Roberto Magagnini

Props

Maurizio Maggi

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
El talento de Mr. Ripley, Mr. Ripley en man med många talanger, Talented Mr. Ripley, talentueux Mr. Ripley
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Suspense/Mystery
Adaptation
Crime
Period
Thriller
Release Date
1999
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
Tuscany, Italy; Cinecitta Studios, Rome, Italy; Naples, Italy; Sicily, Italy; Venice, Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 19m

Award Nominations

Best Adapted Screenplay

1999

Set Decoration

1999

Best Costume Design

1999

Best Original Score

1999

Best Supporting Actor

1999
Jude Law

Articles

The Talented Mr. Ripley


One of the more unorthodox "heroes" of mystery fiction from the past century, Patricia Highsmith's Tom Ripley carved a deadly niche through Europe in a string of novels which found him insinuating his way into high society, terrorizing his socially-inappropriate neighbors, and even "adopting" a son. Best known in the film community as the author of Strangers on a Train (1951), Highsmith published The Talented Mr. Ripley in 1955, introducing a sociopathic cipher whose first-person narrative takes him from the assigned retrieval of a wayward son of privilege, Dickie Greenleaf, to a pair of brutal murders and Ripley's attempts to deceive Dickie's girlfriend, Marge. As Ripley begins to impersonate a life of wealth and largesse, he also finds paranoia part of the package as well.

A film adaptation of the novel was quick to follow in 1960 from France, courtesy of René Clément's Plein Soleil (released in the U.S. as Purple Noon), with a perfectly-cast Alain Delon as Ripley and the slippery, unresolved sexual tensions between the characters carried over faithfully from the book. However, a more socially-acceptable ending finds Ripley meeting traditional justice courtesy of a final Hitchcockian twist.

Astonishingly, it took 39 years for an English-speaking filmmaker to finally take a crack at the Ripley character (with only one other adaptation in the interim, Wim Wenders' The American Friend [1977]), this time under the care of director/playwright Anthony Minghella, fresh off the success of The English Patient [1996]. This time Matt Damon essays the title role, bringing more of a vulnerable, physically awkward, and sexually insecure take on the character, with Jude Law and Gwyneth Paltrow offering appropriately glamorous, pampered characterizations of Dickie and Marge. This version also concocts two major additional characters, chatty heiress Meredith Logue (Babel's [2006] Cate Blanchett) and openly gay love interest Peter Smith-Kingsley (Jack Davenport, shortly before his lead role on the hit BBC show Coupling), an insignificant name from the novel expanded into a pivotal player. Both characters prominently figure in an alternate third act for the story, which finds Ripley in the tortured position of choosing his options between love, murder and imprisonment; oddly enough, both film versions add sexual relationships for Ripley (though of differing genders), while the literary character's desires remain far murkier.

The 1999 film came at the height of prominence for independent giant Miramax, which had become the property of Buena Vista (Walt Disney's entertainment company). The $40 million production became a co-production arrangement with domestic distributor Paramount, who owned the rights to the novel and had initiated the project with Minghella originally tapped to only write the screenplay. The finished product retains a strong Miramax pedigree thanks to the presence of its biggest Oscar®-winning talents-Minghella (The English Patient), Damon (Good Will Hunting [1997]), and Paltrow (Shakespeare in Love [1998]); further art house and critic-friendly credentials were provided by Blanchett (following her acclaimed Elizabeth [1998]) and Philip Seymour Hoffman (as Dickie's nosy friend, Freddie) from Boogie Nights [1997] and Happiness [1998]. The talent behind the camera was no less impressive, including frequent Minghella collaborators like seasoned editor Walter Murch (Apocalypse Now, 1979), Australian cinematographer John Seale (Dead Poets Society [1989]), and composer Gabriel Yared (Betty Blue [1986]), all of whom reunited with Minghella and Law for Cold Mountain [2003].

Involvement of this caliber along with the lustrous Italian locations signaled another feather in the Miramax cap, though the premise – with its elements of homicide, homosexuality, and the disaffected rich – caused some concern before awards season. Damon was candid about the pitfalls of his character in an Entertainment Weekly interview, remarking, "From the moment the decision was made to make this movie we knew this time was going to come. If it's phrased in a really reductive way – a 'fag serial killer' – then Ripley can't be the audience. He's one of them... But everyone's felt like an outsider before... I have hundreds of episodes from high school I'd love to replay – but a lot cooler. I was short – like 5 foot 2 until my junior year, so my sophomore year was terrifying."

The Talented Mr. Ripley opened in theaters on Christmas Day, 1999, and received largely positive reviews, though many audiences were vocally unprepared for the subject matter; nervous giggles were commonplace during many of the Damon/Law scenes. However, audiences soon became receptive and helped it become a strong commercial success, while reviewers were largely positive (with a dissenting Cineaste dismissing it for making the Ripley character too "palatable").

The film earned a respectable clutch of award nominations (including five Academy Awards nods, though it won none); the fact that it opened in the decade's strongest year of filmmaking (including such titles as American Beauty, The Sixth Sense, The Insider, The Matrix, The Straight Story and Being John Malkovich) certainly stalled the usual Miramax campaign juggernaut. However, the film's cultural ripples proved more far-reaching than expected; its sympathetic portrayal of Ripley made him one of Hollywood's first multi-faceted gay protagonists, and soon two more Ripley books became film properties, albeit with far less fortunate outcomes; Liliana Cavani's criminally-underrated Ripley's Game with John Malkovich (it was previously the source for The American Friend) barely opened in Europe in 2002 and went straight to video in America, while Roger Spottiswoode's Ripley Under Ground completed filming in 2005 but, despite a number of announced title changes, has yet to see the light of day.

Producer: Steven E. Andrews, Lydia Dean Pilcher, William Horberg, Sydney Pollack, Tom Sternberg, Paul Zaentz
Director: Anthony Minghella
Screenplay: Anthony Minghella, Patricia Highsmith (novel)
Cinematography: John Seale
Film Editing: Walter Murch
Art Direction: Stefano Ortolani
Music: Gabriel Yared
Cast: Matt Damon (Tom Ripley), Gwyneth Paltrow (Marge Sherwood), Jude Law (Dickie Greenleaf), Cate Blanchett (Meredith Logue), Philip Seymour Hoffman (Freddie Miles), Jack Davenport (Peter Smith-Kingsley).
C-139m. Letterboxed.

by Nathaniel Thompson
The Talented Mr. Ripley

The Talented Mr. Ripley

One of the more unorthodox "heroes" of mystery fiction from the past century, Patricia Highsmith's Tom Ripley carved a deadly niche through Europe in a string of novels which found him insinuating his way into high society, terrorizing his socially-inappropriate neighbors, and even "adopting" a son. Best known in the film community as the author of Strangers on a Train (1951), Highsmith published The Talented Mr. Ripley in 1955, introducing a sociopathic cipher whose first-person narrative takes him from the assigned retrieval of a wayward son of privilege, Dickie Greenleaf, to a pair of brutal murders and Ripley's attempts to deceive Dickie's girlfriend, Marge. As Ripley begins to impersonate a life of wealth and largesse, he also finds paranoia part of the package as well. A film adaptation of the novel was quick to follow in 1960 from France, courtesy of René Clément's Plein Soleil (released in the U.S. as Purple Noon), with a perfectly-cast Alain Delon as Ripley and the slippery, unresolved sexual tensions between the characters carried over faithfully from the book. However, a more socially-acceptable ending finds Ripley meeting traditional justice courtesy of a final Hitchcockian twist. Astonishingly, it took 39 years for an English-speaking filmmaker to finally take a crack at the Ripley character (with only one other adaptation in the interim, Wim Wenders' The American Friend [1977]), this time under the care of director/playwright Anthony Minghella, fresh off the success of The English Patient [1996]. This time Matt Damon essays the title role, bringing more of a vulnerable, physically awkward, and sexually insecure take on the character, with Jude Law and Gwyneth Paltrow offering appropriately glamorous, pampered characterizations of Dickie and Marge. This version also concocts two major additional characters, chatty heiress Meredith Logue (Babel's [2006] Cate Blanchett) and openly gay love interest Peter Smith-Kingsley (Jack Davenport, shortly before his lead role on the hit BBC show Coupling), an insignificant name from the novel expanded into a pivotal player. Both characters prominently figure in an alternate third act for the story, which finds Ripley in the tortured position of choosing his options between love, murder and imprisonment; oddly enough, both film versions add sexual relationships for Ripley (though of differing genders), while the literary character's desires remain far murkier. The 1999 film came at the height of prominence for independent giant Miramax, which had become the property of Buena Vista (Walt Disney's entertainment company). The $40 million production became a co-production arrangement with domestic distributor Paramount, who owned the rights to the novel and had initiated the project with Minghella originally tapped to only write the screenplay. The finished product retains a strong Miramax pedigree thanks to the presence of its biggest Oscar®-winning talents-Minghella (The English Patient), Damon (Good Will Hunting [1997]), and Paltrow (Shakespeare in Love [1998]); further art house and critic-friendly credentials were provided by Blanchett (following her acclaimed Elizabeth [1998]) and Philip Seymour Hoffman (as Dickie's nosy friend, Freddie) from Boogie Nights [1997] and Happiness [1998]. The talent behind the camera was no less impressive, including frequent Minghella collaborators like seasoned editor Walter Murch (Apocalypse Now, 1979), Australian cinematographer John Seale (Dead Poets Society [1989]), and composer Gabriel Yared (Betty Blue [1986]), all of whom reunited with Minghella and Law for Cold Mountain [2003]. Involvement of this caliber along with the lustrous Italian locations signaled another feather in the Miramax cap, though the premise – with its elements of homicide, homosexuality, and the disaffected rich – caused some concern before awards season. Damon was candid about the pitfalls of his character in an Entertainment Weekly interview, remarking, "From the moment the decision was made to make this movie we knew this time was going to come. If it's phrased in a really reductive way – a 'fag serial killer' – then Ripley can't be the audience. He's one of them... But everyone's felt like an outsider before... I have hundreds of episodes from high school I'd love to replay – but a lot cooler. I was short – like 5 foot 2 until my junior year, so my sophomore year was terrifying." The Talented Mr. Ripley opened in theaters on Christmas Day, 1999, and received largely positive reviews, though many audiences were vocally unprepared for the subject matter; nervous giggles were commonplace during many of the Damon/Law scenes. However, audiences soon became receptive and helped it become a strong commercial success, while reviewers were largely positive (with a dissenting Cineaste dismissing it for making the Ripley character too "palatable"). The film earned a respectable clutch of award nominations (including five Academy Awards nods, though it won none); the fact that it opened in the decade's strongest year of filmmaking (including such titles as American Beauty, The Sixth Sense, The Insider, The Matrix, The Straight Story and Being John Malkovich) certainly stalled the usual Miramax campaign juggernaut. However, the film's cultural ripples proved more far-reaching than expected; its sympathetic portrayal of Ripley made him one of Hollywood's first multi-faceted gay protagonists, and soon two more Ripley books became film properties, albeit with far less fortunate outcomes; Liliana Cavani's criminally-underrated Ripley's Game with John Malkovich (it was previously the source for The American Friend) barely opened in Europe in 2002 and went straight to video in America, while Roger Spottiswoode's Ripley Under Ground completed filming in 2005 but, despite a number of announced title changes, has yet to see the light of day. Producer: Steven E. Andrews, Lydia Dean Pilcher, William Horberg, Sydney Pollack, Tom Sternberg, Paul Zaentz Director: Anthony Minghella Screenplay: Anthony Minghella, Patricia Highsmith (novel) Cinematography: John Seale Film Editing: Walter Murch Art Direction: Stefano Ortolani Music: Gabriel Yared Cast: Matt Damon (Tom Ripley), Gwyneth Paltrow (Marge Sherwood), Jude Law (Dickie Greenleaf), Cate Blanchett (Meredith Logue), Philip Seymour Hoffman (Freddie Miles), Jack Davenport (Peter Smith-Kingsley). C-139m. Letterboxed. by Nathaniel Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the 1999 award for Best Score (Gabriel Yared) from the Broadcast Film Critics Association.

Winner of two 1999 awards, including Best Director (Anthony Minghella) and Best Supporting Actor (Philip Seymour Hoffman) from the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures.

Released in United States Winter December 25, 1999

Expanded Release in United States March 24, 2000

Released in United States on Video June 27, 2000

Released in United States February 2000

Released in United States 2008

Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (in competition) February 9-20, 2000.

Patricia Highsmith's novel, the first installment in her Tom Ripley series, was previously adapted to film as "Plein Soleil/Purple Noon" (France/1960), directed and written by Rene Clement and starring Alain Delon.

Anthony Minghella was named NATO/ShoWest 1999 Director of the Year.

Began shooting August 10, 1998.

Completed shooting December 7, 1998.

Released in United States Winter December 25, 1999

Expanded Release in United States March 24, 2000

Released in United States on Video June 27, 2000

Released in United States February 2000 (Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (in competition) February 9-20, 2000.)

Released in United States 2008 (Shown at AFI/Los Angeles International Film Festival (Milestones) October 30-November 9, 2008.)

Nominated for the 1999 award for Best Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published (Anthony Minghella) from the Writers Guild of America.