Rollerball


1h 38m 2002

Brief Synopsis

Jonathan Cross is an all-American hotshot, the most popular player in the fastest and most extreme sport of all time: Rollerball. Along with teammates Marcus Ridley and Aurora, Jonathan is living the high life -- fame, money, incredible cars -- all for giving viewers what they want: a dangerous game

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
2002
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )/SONY PICTURES RELEASING INTERNATIONAL
Location
Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Alberta, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Synopsis

Jonathan Cross is an all-American hotshot, the most popular player in the fastest and most extreme sport of all time: Rollerball. Along with teammates Marcus Ridley and Aurora, Jonathan is living the high life -- fame, money, incredible cars -- all for giving viewers what they want: a dangerous game packed with visceral thrills, breakneck speed and head-slamming action. Things go wrong when Rollerball's creator, Petrovich, realizes that serious on-court accidents bring higher viewer ratings. Soon Jonathan and his friends are playing for their lives. The teammates find themselves trapped in intrigue, pawns in a new game without any rules.

Crew

Dan Ackerman

Other

Howard Anderson

Director Of Photography

Marie-elaine Bailly

Production Coordinator

Hector Balcacer

Visual Effects

Bob Baron

Adr Mixer

Javier Barone

Effects Assistant

Benjamin Beardwood

Dialogue Editor

Steve Beasse

Assistant Camera Operator

Martin Beaudoin

Cgi Artist

Jean-christian Beauregard

Transportation Captain

Annette Belanger

Art Department Coordinator

Felix Belanger

Carpenter

Pierre Bellemare

On-Set Dresser

Laurent Ben-mimoun

Matte Painter

Jonathan Bergeron

Stunts

Irving Berlin

Song

Alexandre Bernard

Assistant Director

Norman Bernard

Boom Operator

Ann Berrie

Camera

Riccardo Bertoni

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Jeanne Beveridge

Other

Matt Birman

Stunts

Guy Bissonnette

Key Grip

Mario Bissonnette

Grip

Samuel Bokobza

Accounting Assistant

Sue Bokobza

Accountant

Marc Bonin

Lighting

Alexandre Bouchard

Video Assist/Playback

Isabelle Bouchard

Stunts

Yvan Bourdage

Steadicam Operator

Michel Bousquet

Carpenter

Dennis Bradford

Production Designer

Anderson Chet Bradshaw

Stunts

Kristen Leigh Branan

Executive Producer

Lyne Briand

Costume Department

Conrad V Brink

Special Effects Coordinator

Diane Brunjes

Assistant Editor

Eric Bryson

Stunts

Roy C Bryson

Hairdresser

Charles John Bukey

Dolly Grip

Charles John Bukey

Key Grip

Lane Burch

Foley Mixer

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Jim Burt

Music

Eddie Bydalek

Rerecording Assistant

Jennifer Bydwell

Other

Francois Campeau

Assistant

Rick Canelli

Adr

Gina M Carroll

Assistant Editor

Melissa J T Carter

Editor

Jean-marc Casavant

Assistant

Dale Caughey

Visual Effects

Jason Cavalier

Stunts

Christian Chabot

Lighting

Michel Charron

Sound Recordist

Mike Chute

Stunts

Jocelyn Clarke

Stunts

Franklin Cofod

Editing

Heidi Cooke

Stunts

Fran Cooper

Makeup

Bruce Cordozo

Rerecording

John Cornejo

Visual Effects

Pierre Couture

Visual Effects

Ken Dackerman

Visual Effects

Binh Dang

Assistant

Brian Daughtry

Assistant

David R Davies

Visual Effects

Catherine Dawe

Location Manager

Cyrille De Smet

Assistant

Michael Degtjarewsky

Visual Effects

Luc Deguise

Wardrobe

Lorense Della Nave

Wardrobe

Benoit Descary

Assistant

Robert Deschane

Adr Mixer

Melanie Desmarais

Production Assistant

Matthew Dettmann

Foley Artist

Bridget Di Salvo

Visual Effects

Samudio Domingo

Song

Serge Dore

Key Grip

Joe Dorn

Adr Editor

Tommy Dorsett

Editor

Attila Dory

Photography

Mitchell S Drain

Visual Effects Supervisor

Rickley W Dumm

Assistant Sound Editor

Jamie Dunlap

Song

Barbara Dunning

Assistant Editor

Emmanuel Dupire

Other

Mark Edey

Special Effects

Teresa Estinosa

Choreographer

Daniel Fair

Assistant Editor

John Paul Fasal

Sound Effects

David Feinner

Art Department

Larry Ferguson

Screenplay

Carolyn Field

Stunts

Andre Fiset

Construction Coordinator

Jean Fiset

Foreman

Kevin Fisher

Rerecording

Dave Fiske

Technical Supervisor

Nicolas Fiszman

Music

Eric Fitzgerald

Titles

Mo Flam

Chief Lighting Technician

Patrick Flanagan

Visual Effects

Christopher Flick

Foley Editor

Carmen Flores De Tanis

Assistant Sound Editor

Chris Flynn

Visual Effects

Tyler Foell

Digital Effects Supervisor

Micheline Forest

Other

Tarn Fox

Other

Jean Frenette

Stunts

Jocelyne Gagnt

Accountant

Kenneth Gagne

On-Set Dresser

Francois S Gagnon

Carpenter

Jean Gagnon

Stunts

Yves Garant

Other

Joe Gareri

Executive Producer

Robert Garrett

Music Editor

Norman Garwood

Production Designer

Louis Gascon

Property Master

David Gaucher

Set Designer

Benoit Gauthier

Stunts

Francois Gauthier

Stunts

George Gervan

Rotoscope Animator

Richard Gervan

Rotoscope Animator

Alex Gibson

Music Editor

Johnny Goar

Stunts

Marceline Gonin

Props Buyer

Linda Gordon

Hairdresser

Ronny Gosselin

Visual Effects

Eric Goulet

Stunts

Christopher Grandell

Art Department

Jim Green

Song

Don Greenberg

Visual Effects

Darcy Greer

Assistant

Rene Guillard

Lighting Technician

Eric Guindon

Carpenter

Nate Haggard

Visual Effects

Martin Hall

Digital Effects Supervisor

Ted Hall

Sound Mixer

Richard Hansen

Hairdresser

Marie-sol Harding

Stunts

Mike Hardison

Digital Effects Supervisor

Kate Harrington

Costume Designer

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

Jessica Harris

Visual Effects

William Harrison

From Story

Allen Hartz

Foley Editor

Anissa Harvey

Assistant Director

Natalie Harvey

Accounting Assistant

James D Hattin

Visual Effects

Reece Jamal Hay

Assistant Location Manager

Maureen Healy

Visual Effects

Gary Hecker

Foley Artist

Scott Hecker

Sound Editor

Karrieann Heisner

Makeup

Jongwoo Heo

Visual Effects

Veronica Hernandez

Visual Effects

Denise Horta

Adr Editor

Gaston Howard

Stunts

Rob Howard

Visual Effects

Heather Hoyland

Visual Effects

Russell Hughes

Medic

Scott Humphrey

Song

Jeff Hutchinson

Visual Effects

Eien Hyett

Titles

Maurice Hyett

Titles

Tony Iammatteo

Editorial Production Assistant

Patrice Iva

Hairdresser

Joe Jackman

Visual Effects

Helen Jarvis

Art Director

Jamie Jones

Stunt Coordinator

Kelly Jones

Stunts

Quincy Jones

Song

Julianne Jordan

Music Supervisor

Serena Juiwen Chang

Visual Effects

Stephane Julien

Stunts

Oded Kassirer

Visual Effects

John P Keating

Consultant

Thomas L Keller

Assistant Costume Designer

Paul D Kelly

Assistant Art Director

Joe Ken

Visual Effects

Derek Khan

Wardrobe

Kevin Kipper

3-D Artist

John G Kirby

Visual Effects

Peter C. Koczera

Art Department

Jon-marc Kortsch

Visual Effects

Carl Kouri

Assistant Director

Marty Kudelka

Choreographer

Andrea Lakin

Rerecording Assistant

Tom Lalley

Sound

Ken Lam

Visual Effects

Stephen Lang

Song

Bertrand Langlois

Accountant

Yves Langlois

Stunts

Gilbert Larose

Stunts

Raymond Larose

Set Designer

Kathleen Latlip

Editorial Production Assistant

Jay Lavalley

Stunts

Jennifer Law-stump

Visual Effects

Lindy Layton

Song

Yvon Leblanc

Production Assistant

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
2002
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )/SONY PICTURES RELEASING INTERNATIONAL
Location
Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Alberta, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m

Articles

Remake - Rollerball


A ROLLERBALL for the 21st Century

Now in theatres is a hyped-up, 21st Century remake of Rollerball. The original 1975 version, directed by Norman Jewison, starred James Caan and John Houseman. The new version promises to take full advantage of special effects technology not available for the 1975 original, as well as some apparently fearless stuntmen. The $80 million film is directed by action specialist John McTiernan (Die Hard, Hunt for Red October) and oddly enough marks his second remake in a row of a film originally by Norman Jewison (after The Thomas Crown Affair). The story remains more or less the same: Chris Klein (in the James Caan role) is uncertain about his future until he hears from suddenly wealthy buddy L.L. Cool J about a new underground sport called Rollerball, a mix of roller derby, motorcycling and sheer mayhem. Klein joins Rollerball and soon becomes one of its biggest stars, only to discover that the corporate boss is much more interested in ratings than in their well-being. The remake will be packed with such familiar faces as model Rebecca Romijn-Stamos (The X-Men), Jean Reno (Mission: Impossible) and pop singer Pink. Bring your crash helmets.

By Lang Thompson

ALWAYS COUNT ON REMAKES

The reason Hollywood continues to remake their past successes is pretty obvious - it's hard to come up with a really good story that audiences want to see retold again and again. Unfortunately, the true art of storytelling died out in the early part of the 20th century which explains why certain tales are recycled every few years. The current case in point is The Count of Monte Cristo, directed by Kevin Reynolds and starring Jim Caviezel, Guy Pierce and Richard Harris. Based on a novel by Alexander Dumas which was written between the years of 1844 and 1846, The Count of Monte Cristo has been adapted for the screen countless times. In fact, it has spawned so many versions that it would take a specialist in Alexander Dumas film adaptations to determine which is the best as well as the most faithful to the novel. One thing is certain, though. The new version starring Jim Caviezel as Edmond Dantes, the title character, is a box office hit. And that's rather refreshing news considering the current state of the action film. How many cop thrillers, terrorist-inspired melodramas and sci-fi combat movies can you take? Kevin Reynold's version of The Count of Monte Cristo is a lavishly produced, old-fashioned costume drama complete with entertaining performances (particularly by Guy Pierce as the villainous Mondego and Richard Harris as the Abbe Faria), exciting action sequences and stunning European locations. But it's the revenge-driven story that captivates audiences. Dumas based his story on fact; in 1809, a man named Francois Picaud was falsely imprisoned on charges that he was a spy. When he was released years later, he mysteriously acquired a fortune and assumed a disguise which enabled him to kill the people who had conspired against him.

Allegedly the first film version of The Count of Monte Cristo is the 1908 version which starred Francis Boggs as Dantes. In 1913 Edwin S. Porter made a version with 66-year-old stage actor James O'Neill in the title role (he played it on the stage). Probably the most popular version (until now) was the 1934 screen adaptation starring Robert Donat as Dantes and Sidney Blackmer as Mondego. It was directed by Rowland V. Lee and is extremely hard to see today. DVD release anyone? Along the way there were unoriginal ripoffs - Louis Hayward as The Son of Monte Cristo (1940) and Ice skating champion Sonja Henie appeared in a comedic spoof called The Countess of Monte Cristo (1948). There were also two French versions of the Dumas novel - one in 1954 starring Jean Marais and one in 1961 with Louis Jourdan. But most American audiences are probably more familiar with the made-for-TV version in 1975 with Richard Chamberlain as Dantes, Tony Curtis as Mondego and Louis Jourdan (this time in the role of De Villefort, the prosecutor. And recently Gerald Depardieu appeared in a mini-series made for television. But the recent film version of The Count of Monte Cristo might be the one to stand the test of time thanks to its epic scope, superb art direction and the way it skillfully updates a 19th century story for contemporary audiences. For more information about The Count of Monte Cristo, visit the Official Web Site.

THE MANY FACES OF JACK THE RIPPER

The recent success of From Hell, the film adaptation of Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell's excellent graphic novel, probably shouldn't have come as a real surprise. Jack the Ripper has fascinated people for well over a century, inspiring a small library of books ranging from the silliest conspiracy text to Iain Sinclair's hallucinatory novels. Inevitably there would be movies featuring the Ripper. He eventually became something of a generic boogeyman, popping up as a minor character in films like Waxwork II: Lost in Time (1992) but there are other films that focus mainly on him.

The first movie with Jack the Ripper appears to have been the 1929 Pandora's Box starring Louise Brooks as a free-spirted woman who may or may not be a prostitute. This was based on the work of the controversial Franz Wedekind, one of Germany's leading playwrights at the turn of the century. His story has been filmed at least seven times, including a 1980 version by Walerian Borowczyk (Immoral Tales). The 1929 version is actually based on two plays, Pandora's Box and Earth-Spirit, the convoluted history of which need not detain us here (except to note that this was also the source of Alban Berg's opera Lulu).

Oddly enough, considering the public interest and dramatic potential, Ripper films have tended to not focus on the actual case. Exceptions are a couple of TV movies, one in 1988 named Jack the Ripper (starring Michael Caine) and one in 1997 entitled The Ripper (starring Gabrielle Anwar) though some might mention the 1959 Jack the Ripper that imagines an American detective heading to London to track down the killer. More commonly though Ripper films attempt some twist to the story, often to the point that they have no relation to the real Jack the Ripper case. An obvious example is the idea of pitting the Ripper against his fictional contemporary Sherlock Holmes. A few novels had used the idea but the first film was A Study in Terror (1965) based on an Ellery Queen novel. More notable perhaps is Murder by Decree (1979) which pits Sherlock Holmes (Christopher Plummer) against a Ripper protected by a vast conspiracy. It was directed by Bob Clark of A Christmas Story (and Porky's fame.

Other cross-breeds with familiar characters occur as well. One of the better examples is Time After Time (1979), directed and co-written by Nicholas Meyer (who had written best-selling novels where Holmes meets Freud and Bernard Shaw). Here, Jack (David Warner) escapes to the 1970s using a time machine and it's up to H.G. Wells (Malcolm McDowell) to follow and capture him. Only Wells didn't plan on falling in love with a bank clerk (Mary Steenburgen), possibly because in his day such clerks were all men. Another example is Edge of Sanity (1989) which adapts the Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde story (with the lead played by Anthony Perkins) so that Mr. Hyde is actually Jack Hyde, aka Jack the Ripper. The Ruling Class (1972) starring Peter O'Toole as an unbalanced English lord features a subplot in which he imagines he IS the Ripper, going so far to even murder a woman on his estate.

Other Ripper films present a later series of murders that follow the earlier pattern. In films like the 1976 Jack the Ripper from prolific cult director Jess Franco (and recently released on DVD), the murderer (Klaus Kinski) is a modern serial killer mimicking the Ripper. A similar idea occurs in Jack the Mangler (1971, aka Jack the Ripper and originally Jack el destripador de Londres) where Spanish cult actor Paul Naschy plays a lunatic re-enacting the Ripper murders. Hands of the Ripper (1971), a Hammer production, features Jack the Ripper's daughter who has grown up to be a very unstabile adult.

Some films go even futher. Take Bridge Across Time (1985), a TV movie that shows the London Bridge being relocated to Arizona where suddenly mysterious murders happen and it's up to policeman David Hasselhoff to save us all. And during the busy days of blaxploitation there was an announcement for Black the Ripper but this appears to have never actually been made. Certainly there are more Ripper films waiting discovery....

By Lang Thompson

Remake - Rollerball

Remake - Rollerball

A ROLLERBALL for the 21st Century Now in theatres is a hyped-up, 21st Century remake of Rollerball. The original 1975 version, directed by Norman Jewison, starred James Caan and John Houseman. The new version promises to take full advantage of special effects technology not available for the 1975 original, as well as some apparently fearless stuntmen. The $80 million film is directed by action specialist John McTiernan (Die Hard, Hunt for Red October) and oddly enough marks his second remake in a row of a film originally by Norman Jewison (after The Thomas Crown Affair). The story remains more or less the same: Chris Klein (in the James Caan role) is uncertain about his future until he hears from suddenly wealthy buddy L.L. Cool J about a new underground sport called Rollerball, a mix of roller derby, motorcycling and sheer mayhem. Klein joins Rollerball and soon becomes one of its biggest stars, only to discover that the corporate boss is much more interested in ratings than in their well-being. The remake will be packed with such familiar faces as model Rebecca Romijn-Stamos (The X-Men), Jean Reno (Mission: Impossible) and pop singer Pink. Bring your crash helmets. By Lang Thompson ALWAYS COUNT ON REMAKES The reason Hollywood continues to remake their past successes is pretty obvious - it's hard to come up with a really good story that audiences want to see retold again and again. Unfortunately, the true art of storytelling died out in the early part of the 20th century which explains why certain tales are recycled every few years. The current case in point is The Count of Monte Cristo, directed by Kevin Reynolds and starring Jim Caviezel, Guy Pierce and Richard Harris. Based on a novel by Alexander Dumas which was written between the years of 1844 and 1846, The Count of Monte Cristo has been adapted for the screen countless times. In fact, it has spawned so many versions that it would take a specialist in Alexander Dumas film adaptations to determine which is the best as well as the most faithful to the novel. One thing is certain, though. The new version starring Jim Caviezel as Edmond Dantes, the title character, is a box office hit. And that's rather refreshing news considering the current state of the action film. How many cop thrillers, terrorist-inspired melodramas and sci-fi combat movies can you take? Kevin Reynold's version of The Count of Monte Cristo is a lavishly produced, old-fashioned costume drama complete with entertaining performances (particularly by Guy Pierce as the villainous Mondego and Richard Harris as the Abbe Faria), exciting action sequences and stunning European locations. But it's the revenge-driven story that captivates audiences. Dumas based his story on fact; in 1809, a man named Francois Picaud was falsely imprisoned on charges that he was a spy. When he was released years later, he mysteriously acquired a fortune and assumed a disguise which enabled him to kill the people who had conspired against him. Allegedly the first film version of The Count of Monte Cristo is the 1908 version which starred Francis Boggs as Dantes. In 1913 Edwin S. Porter made a version with 66-year-old stage actor James O'Neill in the title role (he played it on the stage). Probably the most popular version (until now) was the 1934 screen adaptation starring Robert Donat as Dantes and Sidney Blackmer as Mondego. It was directed by Rowland V. Lee and is extremely hard to see today. DVD release anyone? Along the way there were unoriginal ripoffs - Louis Hayward as The Son of Monte Cristo (1940) and Ice skating champion Sonja Henie appeared in a comedic spoof called The Countess of Monte Cristo (1948). There were also two French versions of the Dumas novel - one in 1954 starring Jean Marais and one in 1961 with Louis Jourdan. But most American audiences are probably more familiar with the made-for-TV version in 1975 with Richard Chamberlain as Dantes, Tony Curtis as Mondego and Louis Jourdan (this time in the role of De Villefort, the prosecutor. And recently Gerald Depardieu appeared in a mini-series made for television. But the recent film version of The Count of Monte Cristo might be the one to stand the test of time thanks to its epic scope, superb art direction and the way it skillfully updates a 19th century story for contemporary audiences. For more information about The Count of Monte Cristo, visit the Official Web Site. THE MANY FACES OF JACK THE RIPPER The recent success of From Hell, the film adaptation of Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell's excellent graphic novel, probably shouldn't have come as a real surprise. Jack the Ripper has fascinated people for well over a century, inspiring a small library of books ranging from the silliest conspiracy text to Iain Sinclair's hallucinatory novels. Inevitably there would be movies featuring the Ripper. He eventually became something of a generic boogeyman, popping up as a minor character in films like Waxwork II: Lost in Time (1992) but there are other films that focus mainly on him. The first movie with Jack the Ripper appears to have been the 1929 Pandora's Box starring Louise Brooks as a free-spirted woman who may or may not be a prostitute. This was based on the work of the controversial Franz Wedekind, one of Germany's leading playwrights at the turn of the century. His story has been filmed at least seven times, including a 1980 version by Walerian Borowczyk (Immoral Tales). The 1929 version is actually based on two plays, Pandora's Box and Earth-Spirit, the convoluted history of which need not detain us here (except to note that this was also the source of Alban Berg's opera Lulu). Oddly enough, considering the public interest and dramatic potential, Ripper films have tended to not focus on the actual case. Exceptions are a couple of TV movies, one in 1988 named Jack the Ripper (starring Michael Caine) and one in 1997 entitled The Ripper (starring Gabrielle Anwar) though some might mention the 1959 Jack the Ripper that imagines an American detective heading to London to track down the killer. More commonly though Ripper films attempt some twist to the story, often to the point that they have no relation to the real Jack the Ripper case. An obvious example is the idea of pitting the Ripper against his fictional contemporary Sherlock Holmes. A few novels had used the idea but the first film was A Study in Terror (1965) based on an Ellery Queen novel. More notable perhaps is Murder by Decree (1979) which pits Sherlock Holmes (Christopher Plummer) against a Ripper protected by a vast conspiracy. It was directed by Bob Clark of A Christmas Story (and Porky's fame. Other cross-breeds with familiar characters occur as well. One of the better examples is Time After Time (1979), directed and co-written by Nicholas Meyer (who had written best-selling novels where Holmes meets Freud and Bernard Shaw). Here, Jack (David Warner) escapes to the 1970s using a time machine and it's up to H.G. Wells (Malcolm McDowell) to follow and capture him. Only Wells didn't plan on falling in love with a bank clerk (Mary Steenburgen), possibly because in his day such clerks were all men. Another example is Edge of Sanity (1989) which adapts the Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde story (with the lead played by Anthony Perkins) so that Mr. Hyde is actually Jack Hyde, aka Jack the Ripper. The Ruling Class (1972) starring Peter O'Toole as an unbalanced English lord features a subplot in which he imagines he IS the Ripper, going so far to even murder a woman on his estate. Other Ripper films present a later series of murders that follow the earlier pattern. In films like the 1976 Jack the Ripper from prolific cult director Jess Franco (and recently released on DVD), the murderer (Klaus Kinski) is a modern serial killer mimicking the Ripper. A similar idea occurs in Jack the Mangler (1971, aka Jack the Ripper and originally Jack el destripador de Londres) where Spanish cult actor Paul Naschy plays a lunatic re-enacting the Ripper murders. Hands of the Ripper (1971), a Hammer production, features Jack the Ripper's daughter who has grown up to be a very unstabile adult. Some films go even futher. Take Bridge Across Time (1985), a TV movie that shows the London Bridge being relocated to Arizona where suddenly mysterious murders happen and it's up to policeman David Hasselhoff to save us all. And during the busy days of blaxploitation there was an announcement for Black the Ripper but this appears to have never actually been made. Certainly there are more Ripper films waiting discovery.... By Lang Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter February 8, 2002

Remake of "Rollerball" (USA/1975), directed by Norman Jewison and starring James Caan and John Houseman.

LL Cool J reportedly received seven figures for this project.

LL Cool J reportedly received seven figures for this project.

Began shooting October 20, 2000.

Completed shooting November 6, 2000.

Mosaic Media Group is a joint venture bewteen Atlas Entertainment, Third Rail and Gold/Miller Productions.

Released in United States Winter February 8, 2002