The Count of Monte Cristo


2h 11m 2002

Brief Synopsis

Dashing young sailor Edmond Dantes is a guileless and honest man, whose peaceful life and plans to marry the beautiful Mercedes are abruptly shattered when his best friend Fernand, who wants Mercedes for himself, deceives him. Set up to be unlawfully sentenced to the infamous island prison of Chatea

Film Details

Also Known As
Count of Monte Cristo, Greven av Monte Cristo, vengeance de Monte Cristo
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2002
Production Company
Air Studios, London; Ardmore Sound, Ltd.; Ardmore Studios Ltd.; Cine Electric, Ltd.; Cineimage; Cosprop; Eastman Kodak; Farani Sartoria Teatrale; Irish Film Board; Near North Insurance Brokerage Of California Inc; Panavision, Ltd.; Picturemill; Pinewood Studios, Ltd.; Pompei; Rca Victor; Spyglass Entertainment Holdings, Llc; Spyglass Entertainment Holdings, Llc; Technicolor; Touchstone Pictures; Twickenham Film Studios; Twickenham Studios
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Constantin Film Development, Inc.; Fs Film Oy; Gaumont Buena Vista International; Myndform; Rialto Films; SF Studios; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
Malta; Ardmore Studios, Bray, Ireland; Dublin, Ireland; Ireland

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 11m

Synopsis

Dashing young sailor Edmond Dantes is a guileless and honest man, whose peaceful life and plans to marry the beautiful Mercedes are abruptly shattered when his best friend Fernand, who wants Mercedes for himself, deceives him. Set up to be unlawfully sentenced to the infamous island prison of Chateau D'If, Edmond is trapped in a nightmare that lasts for thirteen years. Over time everything he ever believed about right and wrong is abandoned and replaced by all-consuming thoughts of vengeance against those who betrayed him. With the help of an equally innocent fellow inmate, Dantes plots and succeeds in his mission to escape from prison, whereupon he transforms himself into the mysterious and wealthy Count of Monte Cristo. With cunning ruthlessness, he cleverly insinuates himself into the French nobility and systematically destroys the men who manipulated and enslaved him.

Crew

Bonnie Adamson

Crew (S V Kaskelot)

Lucy Allen

Stunts

Marilyn Anderson

Technical Assistant Manager (Mill Valley Films/Visual Effects)

David Andrews

Stunts

Rachel Appino

Art Department Trainee

Lynda Armstrong

Key Makeup

Fernando Arranz Losa

Other

Simon Atherton

Other

Russ Bailey

Construction Manager

Del Baker

Stunts

Vanessa Baker

Adr Voice Casting

Anna Lisa Baldacchino

Trainee Assistant Director (2nd Unit)

Steve Baogoptical

Other

Gary Barber

Producer

Richard Barnard

Other

John Bates

Other

Ian Beadle

Crew (S V Kaskelot)

Sharon Beatty

Costume Stand-By

John Bell

Original Music

Graeme Bird

Other

Roger Birnbaum

Producer

Angel Blasquez

Other

Paula Boram

Foley Artist

Stefan Borell

Crew (S V Kaskelot)

Jean Bourne

Script Supervisor

Kate Bowe

Unit Publicist

Richard Bradshaw

Stunts

Chris Brigham

Production Manager

Chris Brigham

Executive Producer

Andy Brown

Music Fixer (London Metropolitan Orchestra)

Francis Browne

Other

Joby Buckingham

Crew (S V Earl Of Pembroke)

Eleandro Buhagiar

Assistant (To Production Manager (Malta Unit))

Andrew Bull

3-D Previs/Interface (Mill Motion Controls/Model Makers & Motion Control)

Martin Bullard

Other

Kim Buttlar

Executive Coordinator To Gary Barber

William Byren

Dressing Props

Aidan Byrne

Senior Special Effects Technician

Johnny Byrne

Set Decorator

Kevin Byrne

Special Effects Supervisor

Patrick Byrne

Dressing Props

Patrick Byrne

Hair Stand-By (2nd Unit)

Barbara Callaghan

Costume Assistant

Jose Luis Callejon Galindo

Other

Alex Cameron

Assistant Hair (Malta Unit)

Grace Camilleri

Dressmaker (Malta Unit)

Josianne Camilleri

Additional Makeup (Malta Unit)

Tim Caplan

Supervisor

Fabrizio Caracciolo

Italian Costume Consultant

Michel Carliez

Other

Nick Causon

Crew (S V Earl Of Pembroke)

Elaine Chapman

Assistant Scenic Artist

Jessica Chavez

Assistant (To Jonathan Glickman)

Francoise Chetcuti

Additional Makeup (Malta Unit)

Chris Chrisafis

Co-Producer (United Kingdom)

Gillian Cody

1st Assistant Accountant

Orla Collins

Accounts Assistant

Maria Collns

Production Coordinator

Fionn Comerford

Other

Michael Connell

Music Editor

Gary Connery

Stunts

Tadgh Conway

Video Assist

Jenny Cooney

Trainee Props Maker

Richard Copeman

Other

Dee Corcoran

Key Hair

Michelle Cordina

Accounts Assistant (Malta Unit)

Mike Costelloe

"B" Camera Focus Puller

Colin Coull

Other

Kieran Cuddihy

Other

Danielle Da Costa

Stunts

Manus Daly

Supervising Carpenter

Stephen Daly

Assistant Art Director

Graham Daniel

Re-Recording Mixer

Marie Darmanin

Additional Makeup (Malta Unit)

Andrew Davies

Screenwriter

Robin Davies

Other

Wesley Davies

Other

Perry Davis

Crew (S V Kaskelot)

Sian Davis

Crew (S V Kaskelot)

Brendan Deasy

Sound Mixer

Robert Delicata

Motion Control Visual Effects Producer (Mill Motion Controls/Model Makers & Motion Control)

Conor Devlin

Art Director

Esther Diaz Cabrera

Other

Laura Dickens

Casting Associate

Enda Doherty

Trainee Assistant Director

Brendan Donnison

Adr Voice Casting

Fionnuala Dorney

Construction Department Coordinator

Chris Douridas

Music Supervisor

Sharon Dowding

Crew (S V Earl Of Pembroke)

Audrey Doyle

Makeup Stand-By (2nd Unit)

Stephen Doyle

Riggin Gaffer (Malta)

Tony Doyle

Other

Edward Drew

Small Animal Handler

Alexandre Dumas

Source Material (From Novel)

Andrew Dunn

Dp/Cinematographer

Andrew Dunn

Director Of Photography

Alan Dunne

Dressing Props

David Earley

Digital Matte Painter (Mill Valley Films/Visual Effects)

Cos Egan

Dressing Props

Erin Egan

Accounts Assistant

Nick Eggett

Crew (S V Earl Of Pembroke)

Robert Elhi

Original Music

Pierre Ellul

Additional 3rd Assistant Director (Malta Unit)

Derek Evans

Co-Producer

Dany Everett

Costume Coodinator (United Kingdom)

Gerry Farrell

Special Effects Technician

Lieutenant Michael Farrugia

Helicopter Pilot (Malta Unit)

Kelvin Feeney

Costume Stand-By

Andy Feery

Cg Artist (Mill Valley Films/Visual Effects)

Malcolm Scerri Ferrante

Production Manager (Malta Unit)

Stan Fiferman

Foley Artist

Greg Fisher

Cg Artist (Mill Valley Films/Visual Effects)

Ann-marie Fitzgerald

Post Accounting

James Flynn

Co-Producer (Ireland)

Vic Frasier

Music Preparation

Eduardo Gago Oliveri

Other

Lilian Gahlin

Compositor (Mill Valley Films/Visual Effects)

Rita Galea

Assistant Coordinator (Malta Unit)

Pablo Garcia Ortega

Other

Cara Gavigan

Location Manager (Malta Unit)

Mark Geraghty

Production Designer

Juanita Gill

Crew (S V Earl Of Pembroke)

Jonathan Glickman

Producer

Ingrid Goodwin

Locations Department Coordinator

Karen Gordon

Other

Ciara Gormley

Assistant Art Director

Martin Goulding

Art Director (Malta Unit)

Alan Graham

Gaffer (2nd Unit)

Charles Green

Other

Eric Greenberg

Other

Adrienne Greenhalgh

Assistant Director

Jen Griffin

2nd Assistant Accountant

Carol Grist

Crew (S V Kaskelot)

Kevin Grist

Crew (S V Kaskelot)

Dave Gurney

Other

James Haggar

2nd Assistant Director (2nd Unit)

Andrew Haigh

Assistant Editor (United Kingdom)

Ray Hall

Grip (2nd Unit)

Yan Hammond

Motion Control

Martin Hayes

Supervising Carpenter

Martin Hayes

Crew (S V Kaskelot)

Simon Heck

Other

Tara Hegarty

Assistant (To Chris Brigham)

Jonathan Hession

Stills Photographer

Bernard Hickie

Other

Connie Hill

Accounts Assistant (Malta Unit)

Manus Hingerty

Location Manager

Bill Hobbs

Fight Arranger

Eoin Holohan

Location Assistant (Malta Unit)

Cephas Howard

Underwater Gaffer (2nd Unit)

Jessamy Howarth

Crew (S V Earl Of Pembroke)

Lorea Hoye

Visual Effects Producer (Mill Valley Films/Visual Effects)

Bob Huberman

1st Assistant Director

Malcolm Hues

Grip

Laurent Hugueniot

Cg Supervisor (Mill Valley Films/Visual Effects)

Rowley Irlam

Stunts

Christina Jackson

Other

Dan Jammieson

Crew (S V Earl Of Pembroke)

Priscilla John

Casting (United Kingdom)

Ian Johns

Sound Trainee

Peter Joly

Supervising Sound Editor

Pete Jopling

Compositor (Mill Valley Films/Visual Effects)

Tanya Kakoma

Costume Stand-By

Ciaran Kavanagh

Other

Jimmy Kavanagh

Other

Daryl Kell

Music Editor

Sandra Kelly

Assistant Hair

Ivan Kennedy

Assistant Wrangler

Ray Kenny

Trainee Assistant Director

Paul Kersey

Other

Raymond Kirk

3rd Assistant Director

Rene Knol

Chargehand Dressing Props

Marcelle Gianna Koudakis

Seamstress (Malta Unit)

Clare Lambe

Assistant Make-Up

Mark Lane

2nd Assistant Editor (United Kingdom)

Daragh Lewis

Stand-By Props

Owen Lewis

Dressing Props

Nessa Linnane

Other

Juan Antonio Lopez Enciso

Other

Rafael Lopez Plaza

Other

Clare Mahoney

Foley Artist

Lilene Mansell

Dialect Coach

Bailey Marks

Trainee Assistant Director

Iain Marshall

Crew (S V Kaskelot)

Niall Martin

Assistant Location Supervisor

Enrique Martin Diaz

Other

Davie Mayes

Other

Dorothy Mcdonnell

Production Trainee

James Mcgeytrick

Trainee Stand-By Props

Stephen Mcgillen

Post Accounting

Sinead Mcgoldrick

Assistant Editor (Ireland)

James Mcguire

Gaffer

Seamus Mcinerney

Production Manager

Nuala Mckernan

Chargehand Stand-By Props

Laura Mckinney

Assistant Buyer

Stephen Mclaughlin

Score Recorder & Mixer

Ruth Mcmahon

Other

Jane Mcnally

Production Manager (2nd Unit)

Killian Mcnulty

Props Storeman

Jimmy Merrigan

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Count of Monte Cristo, Greven av Monte Cristo, vengeance de Monte Cristo
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2002
Production Company
Air Studios, London; Ardmore Sound, Ltd.; Ardmore Studios Ltd.; Cine Electric, Ltd.; Cineimage; Cosprop; Eastman Kodak; Farani Sartoria Teatrale; Irish Film Board; Near North Insurance Brokerage Of California Inc; Panavision, Ltd.; Picturemill; Pinewood Studios, Ltd.; Pompei; Rca Victor; Spyglass Entertainment Holdings, Llc; Spyglass Entertainment Holdings, Llc; Technicolor; Touchstone Pictures; Twickenham Film Studios; Twickenham Studios
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Constantin Film Development, Inc.; Fs Film Oy; Gaumont Buena Vista International; Myndform; Rialto Films; SF Studios; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
Malta; Ardmore Studios, Bray, Ireland; Dublin, Ireland; Ireland

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 11m

Articles

Remake - The Count of Monte Cristo


ALWAYS COUNT ON REMAKES

The reason Hollywood continues to remake their past successes is pretty obvious - it's hard to come up with a really good story that audiences want to see retold again and again. Unfortunately, the true art of storytelling died out in the early part of the 20th century which explains why certain tales are recycled every few years. The current case in point is The Count of Monte Cristo, directed by Kevin Reynolds and starring Jim Caviezel, Guy Pierce and Richard Harris. Based on a novel by Alexander Dumas which was written between the years of 1844 and 1846, The Count of Monte Cristo has been adapted for the screen countless times. In fact, it has spawned so many versions that it would take a specialist in Alexander Dumas film adaptations to determine which is the best as well as the most faithful to the novel. One thing is certain, though. The new version starring Jim Caviezel as Edmond Dantes, the title character, is a box office hit. And that's rather refreshing news considering the current state of the action film. How many cop thrillers, terrorist-inspired melodramas and sci-fi combat movies can you take? Kevin Reynold's version of The Count of Monte Cristo is a lavishly produced, old-fashioned costume drama complete with entertaining performances (particularly by Guy Pierce as the villainous Mondego and Richard Harris as the Abbe Faria), exciting action sequences and stunning European locations. But it's the revenge-driven story that captivates audiences. Dumas based his story on fact; in 1809, a man named Francois Picaud was falsely imprisoned on charges that he was a spy. When he was released years later, he mysteriously acquired a fortune and assumed a disguise which enabled him to kill the people who had conspired against him.

Allegedly the first film version of The Count of Monte Cristo is the 1908 version which starred Francis Boggs as Dantes. In 1913 Edwin S. Porter made a version with 66-year-old stage actor James O'Neill in the title role (he played it on the stage). Probably the most popular version (until now) was the 1934 screen adaptation starring Robert Donat as Dantes and Sidney Blackmer as Mondego. It was directed by Rowland V. Lee and is extremely hard to see today. DVD release anyone? Along the way there were unoriginal ripoffs - Louis Hayward as The Son of Monte Cristo (1940) and Ice skating champion Sonja Henie appeared in a comedic spoof called The Countess of Monte Cristo (1948). There were also two French versions of the Dumas novel - one in 1954 starring Jean Marais and one in 1961 with Louis Jourdan. But most American audiences are probably more familiar with the made-for-TV version in 1975 with Richard Chamberlain as Dantes, Tony Curtis as Mondego and Louis Jourdan (this time in the role of De Villefort, the prosecutor. And recently Gerald Depardieu appeared in a mini-series made for television. But the recent film version of The Count of Monte Cristo might be the one to stand the test of time thanks to its epic scope, superb art direction and the way it skillfully updates a 19th century story for contemporary audiences. For more information about The Count of Monte Cristo, visit the Official Web Site.

THE MANY FACES OF JACK THE RIPPER

The recent success of From Hell, the film adaptation of Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell's excellent graphic novel, probably shouldn't have come as a real surprise. Jack the Ripper has fascinated people for well over a century, inspiring a small library of books ranging from the silliest conspiracy text to Iain Sinclair's hallucinatory novels. Inevitably there would be movies featuring the Ripper. He eventually became something of a generic boogeyman, popping up as a minor character in films like Waxwork II: Lost in Time (1992) but there are other films that focus mainly on him.

The first movie with Jack the Ripper appears to have been the 1929 Pandora's Box starring Louise Brooks as a free-spirted woman who may or may not be a prostitute. This was based on the work of the controversial Franz Wedekind, one of Germany's leading playwrights at the turn of the century. His story has been filmed at least seven times, including a 1980 version by Walerian Borowczyk (Immoral Tales). The 1929 version is actually based on two plays, Pandora's Box and Earth-Spirit, the convoluted history of which need not detain us here (except to note that this was also the source of Alban Berg's opera Lulu).

Oddly enough, considering the public interest and dramatic potential, Ripper films have tended to not focus on the actual case. Exceptions are a couple of TV movies, one in 1988 named Jack the Ripper (starring Michael Caine) and one in 1997 entitled The Ripper (starring Gabrielle Anwar) though some might mention the 1959 Jack the Ripper that imagines an American detective heading to London to track down the killer. More commonly though Ripper films attempt some twist to the story, often to the point that they have no relation to the real Jack the Ripper case. An obvious example is the idea of pitting the Ripper against his fictional contemporary Sherlock Holmes. A few novels had used the idea but the first film was A Study in Terror (1965) based on an Ellery Queen novel. More notable perhaps is Murder by Decree (1979) which pits Sherlock Holmes (Christopher Plummer) against a Ripper protected by a vast conspiracy. It was directed by Bob Clark of A Christmas Story (and Porky's fame.

Other cross-breeds with familiar characters occur as well. One of the better examples is Time After Time (1979), directed and co-written by Nicholas Meyer (who had written best-selling novels where Holmes meets Freud and Bernard Shaw). Here, Jack (David Warner) escapes to the 1970s using a time machine and it's up to H.G. Wells (Malcolm McDowell) to follow and capture him. Only Wells didn't plan on falling in love with a bank clerk (Mary Steenburgen), possibly because in his day such clerks were all men. Another example is Edge of Sanity (1989) which adapts the Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde story (with the lead played by Anthony Perkins) so that Mr. Hyde is actually Jack Hyde, aka Jack the Ripper. The Ruling Class (1972) starring Peter O'Toole as an unbalanced English lord features a subplot in which he imagines he IS the Ripper, going so far to even murder a woman on his estate.

Other Ripper films present a later series of murders that follow the earlier pattern. In films like the 1976 Jack the Ripper from prolific cult director Jess Franco (and recently released on DVD), the murderer (Klaus Kinski) is a modern serial killer mimicking the Ripper. A similar idea occurs in Jack the Mangler (1971, aka Jack the Ripper and originally Jack el destripador de Londres) where Spanish cult actor Paul Naschy plays a lunatic re-enacting the Ripper murders. Hands of the Ripper (1971), a Hammer production, features Jack the Ripper's daughter who has grown up to be a very unstabile adult.

Some films go even futher. Take Bridge Across Time (1985), a TV movie that shows the London Bridge being relocated to Arizona where suddenly mysterious murders happen and it's up to policeman David Hasselhoff to save us all. And during the busy days of blaxploitation there was an announcement for Black the Ripper but this appears to have never actually been made. Certainly there are more Ripper films waiting discovery....

By Lang Thompson

Remake - The Count Of Monte Cristo

Remake - The Count of Monte Cristo

ALWAYS COUNT ON REMAKES The reason Hollywood continues to remake their past successes is pretty obvious - it's hard to come up with a really good story that audiences want to see retold again and again. Unfortunately, the true art of storytelling died out in the early part of the 20th century which explains why certain tales are recycled every few years. The current case in point is The Count of Monte Cristo, directed by Kevin Reynolds and starring Jim Caviezel, Guy Pierce and Richard Harris. Based on a novel by Alexander Dumas which was written between the years of 1844 and 1846, The Count of Monte Cristo has been adapted for the screen countless times. In fact, it has spawned so many versions that it would take a specialist in Alexander Dumas film adaptations to determine which is the best as well as the most faithful to the novel. One thing is certain, though. The new version starring Jim Caviezel as Edmond Dantes, the title character, is a box office hit. And that's rather refreshing news considering the current state of the action film. How many cop thrillers, terrorist-inspired melodramas and sci-fi combat movies can you take? Kevin Reynold's version of The Count of Monte Cristo is a lavishly produced, old-fashioned costume drama complete with entertaining performances (particularly by Guy Pierce as the villainous Mondego and Richard Harris as the Abbe Faria), exciting action sequences and stunning European locations. But it's the revenge-driven story that captivates audiences. Dumas based his story on fact; in 1809, a man named Francois Picaud was falsely imprisoned on charges that he was a spy. When he was released years later, he mysteriously acquired a fortune and assumed a disguise which enabled him to kill the people who had conspired against him. Allegedly the first film version of The Count of Monte Cristo is the 1908 version which starred Francis Boggs as Dantes. In 1913 Edwin S. Porter made a version with 66-year-old stage actor James O'Neill in the title role (he played it on the stage). Probably the most popular version (until now) was the 1934 screen adaptation starring Robert Donat as Dantes and Sidney Blackmer as Mondego. It was directed by Rowland V. Lee and is extremely hard to see today. DVD release anyone? Along the way there were unoriginal ripoffs - Louis Hayward as The Son of Monte Cristo (1940) and Ice skating champion Sonja Henie appeared in a comedic spoof called The Countess of Monte Cristo (1948). There were also two French versions of the Dumas novel - one in 1954 starring Jean Marais and one in 1961 with Louis Jourdan. But most American audiences are probably more familiar with the made-for-TV version in 1975 with Richard Chamberlain as Dantes, Tony Curtis as Mondego and Louis Jourdan (this time in the role of De Villefort, the prosecutor. And recently Gerald Depardieu appeared in a mini-series made for television. But the recent film version of The Count of Monte Cristo might be the one to stand the test of time thanks to its epic scope, superb art direction and the way it skillfully updates a 19th century story for contemporary audiences. For more information about The Count of Monte Cristo, visit the Official Web Site. THE MANY FACES OF JACK THE RIPPER The recent success of From Hell, the film adaptation of Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell's excellent graphic novel, probably shouldn't have come as a real surprise. Jack the Ripper has fascinated people for well over a century, inspiring a small library of books ranging from the silliest conspiracy text to Iain Sinclair's hallucinatory novels. Inevitably there would be movies featuring the Ripper. He eventually became something of a generic boogeyman, popping up as a minor character in films like Waxwork II: Lost in Time (1992) but there are other films that focus mainly on him. The first movie with Jack the Ripper appears to have been the 1929 Pandora's Box starring Louise Brooks as a free-spirted woman who may or may not be a prostitute. This was based on the work of the controversial Franz Wedekind, one of Germany's leading playwrights at the turn of the century. His story has been filmed at least seven times, including a 1980 version by Walerian Borowczyk (Immoral Tales). The 1929 version is actually based on two plays, Pandora's Box and Earth-Spirit, the convoluted history of which need not detain us here (except to note that this was also the source of Alban Berg's opera Lulu). Oddly enough, considering the public interest and dramatic potential, Ripper films have tended to not focus on the actual case. Exceptions are a couple of TV movies, one in 1988 named Jack the Ripper (starring Michael Caine) and one in 1997 entitled The Ripper (starring Gabrielle Anwar) though some might mention the 1959 Jack the Ripper that imagines an American detective heading to London to track down the killer. More commonly though Ripper films attempt some twist to the story, often to the point that they have no relation to the real Jack the Ripper case. An obvious example is the idea of pitting the Ripper against his fictional contemporary Sherlock Holmes. A few novels had used the idea but the first film was A Study in Terror (1965) based on an Ellery Queen novel. More notable perhaps is Murder by Decree (1979) which pits Sherlock Holmes (Christopher Plummer) against a Ripper protected by a vast conspiracy. It was directed by Bob Clark of A Christmas Story (and Porky's fame. Other cross-breeds with familiar characters occur as well. One of the better examples is Time After Time (1979), directed and co-written by Nicholas Meyer (who had written best-selling novels where Holmes meets Freud and Bernard Shaw). Here, Jack (David Warner) escapes to the 1970s using a time machine and it's up to H.G. Wells (Malcolm McDowell) to follow and capture him. Only Wells didn't plan on falling in love with a bank clerk (Mary Steenburgen), possibly because in his day such clerks were all men. Another example is Edge of Sanity (1989) which adapts the Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde story (with the lead played by Anthony Perkins) so that Mr. Hyde is actually Jack Hyde, aka Jack the Ripper. The Ruling Class (1972) starring Peter O'Toole as an unbalanced English lord features a subplot in which he imagines he IS the Ripper, going so far to even murder a woman on his estate. Other Ripper films present a later series of murders that follow the earlier pattern. In films like the 1976 Jack the Ripper from prolific cult director Jess Franco (and recently released on DVD), the murderer (Klaus Kinski) is a modern serial killer mimicking the Ripper. A similar idea occurs in Jack the Mangler (1971, aka Jack the Ripper and originally Jack el destripador de Londres) where Spanish cult actor Paul Naschy plays a lunatic re-enacting the Ripper murders. Hands of the Ripper (1971), a Hammer production, features Jack the Ripper's daughter who has grown up to be a very unstabile adult. Some films go even futher. Take Bridge Across Time (1985), a TV movie that shows the London Bridge being relocated to Arizona where suddenly mysterious murders happen and it's up to policeman David Hasselhoff to save us all. And during the busy days of blaxploitation there was an announcement for Black the Ripper but this appears to have never actually been made. Certainly there are more Ripper films waiting discovery.... By Lang Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 25, 2002

Released in United States on Video September 10, 2003

Completed shooting October 2000.

Began shooting July 24, 2000.

Released in United States Winter January 25, 2002

Released in United States on Video September 10, 2003