All Dogs Go to Heaven 2


1h 24m 1996

Brief Synopsis

The story finds our canine hero Charlie in dog Heaven -- literally -- where he should be enjoying his afterlife. Unfortunately, he has decided that, though his reward may be in Heaven, it's a lot more fun scamming for it back on earth. Charlie gets his chance at a return trip to earth when Gabriel's

Film Details

MPAA Rating
G
Genre
Adventure
Comedy
Family
Musical
Sequel
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Dublin, Ireland

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m

Synopsis

Charlie in dog is in Heaven where he should be enjoying his afterlife. Unfortunately, he has decided that, though his reward may be in Heaven, it's a lot more fun scamming for it back on earth. Charlie gets his chance at a return trip to earth when Gabriel's Horn is stolen and falls from Heaven, and he is assigned to retrieve it. Reunited with his old pal Itchy, Charlie is also joined in his quest by a beautiful Irish setter named Sasha and a young runaway boy named David. The reluctant canine angel Charlie proves to be more worthy of his wings than even he imagined as he battles the foul feline Red and the traitorous bulldog Carface to regain the precious horn and save Heaven.

Crew

Niall Acott

Other

Deborah Ahee

Assistant

Miguel Alaminos

Animator

Paco Alaminos

Animator

Doug Allen

Production Manager

Melanie Allen

Animator

Jose Alonso

Animator

Barry Anderson

Animator

Ian Anderson

Animator

Philip Anderson

Animator

Lilian Andre

Animator

Harry Andronis

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Meelis Arulepp

Animator

James Ashwill

Foley Mixer

Jeff Astofolo

Animator

Dino Athanassiou

Storyboard Artist

Dino Athanassiou

Segment Director

Dino Athanassiou

Props

Eric Athanassiou

Animator

Audrey Auld

Other

Enzo Avolio

Inbetweener

Barry Baker

Animator

Kyung Hee Baker

Animator

Paul Baker

Animator

Alison Barrass

Color

Mike Bass

Animator

Jee Chan Baylis

Inbetweener

Jill Bell

Animator

Julie Bell

Other

Cecile Bender

Animator

Doug Bennett

Animation Director

June Bennett

Other

Rune Brandt Bennicke

Animator

Amy Louise Berenz

Layout Artist

Bibo Bergeron

Animation Director

Arnaud Berthier

Animator

Joselito Bien

Inbetweener

John Bigler

Accounting Assistant

Tang Pei Bin

Animator

Sharon Blake

Assistant

Helene Blitz

Post-Production

Gillian Bolger

Effects Assistant

Bittoria Bolgna

Animator

Alan Boon

Other

Terence Bow

Other

Jason Boyer

Production Assistant

Michael Boylan

Other

Neill Boyle

Animator

Michael Bradley

Editor

Gerard Brady

Inbetweener

Trevor Branningan

Other

Karl Bredendieck

Other

Melanie Bredendieck

Production Assistant

Thomas Brennan

Other

Sandra Breslin

Production Assistant

Jon Brooks

Digital Effects Supervisor

Peter Brown

Special Effects

Peter Brown

Animator

Jacques Bruyns

Production Assistant

Monique Buchans

Other

Michaela Budde

Special Effects Assistant

Michael Burgess

Animator

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Anne Byrne

Art Department

Christine Byrne

Assistant

John Byrne

Storyboard Artist

John Byrne

Animation Director

Jonathan Byrne

Layout Artist

Mark C Byrne

Inbetweener

Mark T Byrne

Layout Artist

Pauline Walsh Byrne

Animator

Romaine Byrne

Animator

Janet Cable

Special Effects Assistant

Pete Canderland

Animator

Fionnuala Carpendale

Production Assistant

Michael Carroll

Inbetweener

Yvonne Carthy

Color

Dominick Certo

Music Editor

Joseph Chan

Camera Operator

Tang Ghia Chan

Animator

Gino Chang

Camera Operator

Lin Li Chen

Animator

Seun Kai Chen

Background Painter

Susan Chen

Assistant

Farouk Cherfi

Animator

Elsie Cheri

Animator

Ron Chevarie

Inbetweener

Pascal Chevé

Production Supervisor

Lai Ghia Chi

Animator

Stan Chiu

Animator

Hseh Ming Chung

Animator

Paul Chung

Animator

Paul Clare

Other

Eimear Clonan

Other

Odile Comon

Animator

Kevin Condron

Other

Mary Conners

Other

John Cooley

Other

Marcos Aurelio Correa

Animator

Denis Couchon

Animator

Nicola Courtney

Animator

Robert M. Cowan

Special Effects

Nollaig Cronbie

Other

Caroline Cruikshank

Animator

Rowena Cruz

Animator

John Cucci

Foley Artist

Mark Cumberton

Special Effects

Teresa Cunniffe

Other

Anna Curry

Producer

Ricardo Curtis

Animator

Aaron Daniel

Production Assistant

Anne Daniels

Other

Tonia Davall

Music Contractor

Chris David

Rerecording

Trevor Davies

Special Effects

Janine Dawson

Animator

Michael Daze

Animator

Joel De La Cruz

Inbetweener

Stephen Deane

Special Effects Assistant

Denis Deegan

Animator

Jason Deegan

Other

Marc Degagne

Production Coordinator

Rogelio Degodoy

Animator

Jean Deleani

Inbetweener

Nivaldo Delmaschio

Animator

Pete Denomme

Special Effects

Lee Gen Der

Animator

Jonathan Dern

Producer

Piet Derycker

Animator

Robert Deschane

Adr Mixer

Rafael Diaz

Animator

Sara Dick

Inbetweener

Allan Dickson

Assistant

Michael Dillingham

Production Assistant

Catherine Dillion

Assistant

Fang Ding

Production Manager

Brian Dodd

Inbetweener

Deena Doherty

Assistant

Sheryl Doland

Inbetweener

Bonnie Dombrowski

Dialogue Editor

Hwang Young Dong

Animator

Aroon Donpaisod

Production Manager

John Dorman

Storyboard Artist

Karen Doulac

Assistant Editor

Karen Dove

Assistant

Bernadette Dowling

Production Assistant

Madeleine Downes

Assistant

Chris Drew

Animator

Patrick Duffy

Camera Operator

Colm Duggan

Animator

Des Duggan

Layout Artist

Helga Egilson

Other

Marc Ellis

Special Effects Assistant

David Emerson

Production Assistant

Thom Enriquez

Storyboard Artist

Maria Estrada

Casting Director

Stuart Evans

Animator

Yen Sung Far

Special Effects Supervisor

Wayne Farrar

Production Assistant

James Farrington

Special Effects

Luca Fattore

Animator

Jesse Fawcett

Production Manager

David Feiss

Storyboard Artist

David Feiss

Props

David Feiss

Animation Director

Thomas Fenger

Other

Tanya Fenton

Animator

Charles Fernandez

Original Music

Bruce Ferriz

Animator

Paula Fitzpatrick

Assistant Editor

Stefan Fjeldmark

Layout Artist

Nicola Flynn

Other

Paul Fogarty

Special Effects Assistant

Erric Fokkens

Background Painter

Lin Suu Fong

Animator

Des Forde

Animator

Bruce L. Fowler

Original Music

Emmanuel Franck

Animation Supervisor

Tom Fravestock

Assistant

Liou Yi Fung

Animator

Manuel Galiana

Animation Director

Paul Gallagher

Camera Operator

Chuck Gamage

Animator

Tony Garber

Editor

Natalie Gavet

Animator

Nathalie Gavet

Assistant

Carmel Gavin

Other

An Gellert

Other

Gary S. Gerlich

Sound Editor

Bill Giggie

Animator

Stephanie Gignac

Layout Artist

Miguel Gil

Background Painter

Brian Gilmore

Effects Assistant

Morgan Ginsberg

Animator

Ho Wun Giun

Animator

John Given

Original Music

Maurice Glacomini

Animation Supervisor

Susanne Gloerfelt-tarp

Production Assistant

Gerry Gogan

Assistant Editor

Carmen Gonzales

Animator

Film Details

MPAA Rating
G
Genre
Adventure
Comedy
Family
Musical
Sequel
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Dublin, Ireland

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m

Articles

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)


Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70.

He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950).

After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor.

Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez.

Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati.

Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70. He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950). After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor. Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati. Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring March 29, 1996

Released in United States on Video August 27, 1996

Sequel to Goldcrest Films' "All Dogs Go To Heaven" (United Kingdom/1989), directed by Don Bluth, Dan Kuenster and Gary Goldman.

Completed shooting March 1996.

Began shooting fall 1994.

Released in United States Spring March 29, 1996

Released in United States on Video August 27, 1996