Shampoo


1h 49m 1975
Shampoo

Brief Synopsis

A hairdresser expresses his fear of commitment by seducing his female clients.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1975
Production Company
Columbia Pictures; Pacific Title & Art Studio
Distribution Company
Rca; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Bel Air, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Beverly Hills, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)

Synopsis

On Election Day, 1968, hairdresser and ladies' man George Roundy is too busy cutting hair and dealing with his various girlfriends to worry about the historic Presidential race. As George juggles the demands of his girlfriend Jill and mistress Felicia, he meets Felicia's husband Lester to try to get a loan to help his hairdressing salon. He discovers that Lester is now bedding his ex-girlfriend Jackie. Lester asks George to escort Jackie to a Nixon fundraiser, which leads both to confrontation and a crazy orgy among the high-toned guests. The next day, Nixon has won the election, and George's easygoing world is falling apart around him.

Crew

Richmond Aguilar

Gaffer

Robert Barrere

Assistant Editor

The Beatles

Song Performer ("Sgt. Pepper'S Lonely Hearts Club Band" "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds")

Warren Beatty

Producer

Warren Beatty

Screenwriter

Kathryn Blondell

Hairdresser

W Stewart Campbell

Art Direction

Tom Chase

Makeup

Helen L Feibelmann

Production Assistant

Jane Feinberg

Casting

Mike Fenton

Casting

George Gaines

Set Decorator

Robert W Glass

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Robert Jiras

Assistant (To Producers)

Ken S Johnson

Music Editor

Robert C. Jones

Editor

Robert Knudson

Sound Department

Laszlo Kovacs

Director Of Photography

John Lennon

Song ("Sgt. Pepper'S Lonely Hearts Club Band" "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds")

Ralph M Leo

Other

Alan Levine

Property Master

Art Levinson

1st Assistant Director

Len Lookabaugh

Key Grip

Mike Love

Song ("Wouldn'T It Be Nice")

Charles Maguire

Production Manager

Charles Maguire

Associate Producer

Doe Mayer

Research

Paul Mccartney

Song ("Sgt. Pepper'S Lonely Hearts Club Band" "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds")

Tommy Overton

Sound Mixer

William Parks

Construction Coordinator

Lester Persky

Producer

Thalia Phillips

Wardrobe (Women)

Phil Ramone

Technical Advisor (Music)

Laurie Riley

Wardrobe (Men)

Joel Schwartz

Research

Gene Shacove

Technical Consultant

Paul Simon

Music

Peter Sorrel

Stills

Barbara Spitz

Other

Anthea Sylbert

Costume Designer

Richard Sylbert

Production Designer

Robert C. Thomas

Camera Operator

Jim Thornsberry

Transportation

Robert Towne

Screenwriter

Dan Wallin

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Frank Warner

Sound Editor

Carrie White

Technical Consultant

Meta Wilde

Continuity

Patrick Williams

Original Music

Brian Wilson

Song ("Wouldn'T It Be Nice")

Sheila Woodland

Other

Ron L Wright

2nd Assistant Director

Neil Young

Song ("Hell, Mr Soul")

Don Zimmerman

Assistant Editor

Photo Collections

Shampoo - Movie Poster
Shampoo - Movie Poster

Videos

Movie Clip

Shampoo (1975) - Don't Let The Steam Out George (Warren Beatty) has just finished doing a cut for former girlfriend Jackie (Julie Christie) and decides to get friendly when Lester (Jack Warden), her current lover and his potential financier, who presumes he's gay, turns up, Hal Ashby directing, in Shampoo, 1975.
Shampoo (1975) - I'm A Star At the Beverly Hills salon where he works for Norman (Jay Robinson), hairdresser George (co-writer and producer Warren Beatty), aiming to start his own salon, juggles wealthy client/girlfriend Felicia (Lee Grant) and actual girlfriend Jill (Goldie Hawn), who may have an offer to work abroad, in Shampoo, 1975.
Shampoo (1975) - Don't Let Me Drink Too Much Escorting his ex-paramour Jackie (Julie Christie), along with current girlfriend Jill (Goldie Hawn), who’s officially with director Johnny (Tony Bill), hairdresser George (producer and co-writer Warren Beatty) at a Beverly Hills Republican election night party, November 1968, Jack Warden as high-roller Lester, Jackie’s sugar-daddy, who thinks George is gay, in Shampoo, 1975.
Shampoo (1975) - Somebody's Gonna Get Me Called away from another tryst elsewhere in LA, November 4, 1968, hair stylist George (co-writer and producer Warren Beatty) visits needy Jill (Goldie Hawn, her first scene) at her Laurel Canyon pad, in director Hal Ashby's Shampoo, 1975.
Shampoo (1975) - Open, She's Not A Girl Director Hal Ashby working in the dark, co-writer and producer Warren Beatty and Lee Grant (in her academy award-winning role) his subjects, in the famous opening to Shampoo, 1975, also starring Julie Christie and Goldie Hawn.

Trailer

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1975
Production Company
Columbia Pictures; Pacific Title & Art Studio
Distribution Company
Rca; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Bel Air, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Beverly Hills, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)

Award Wins

Best Supporting Actress

1975
Lee Grant

Award Nominations

Best Art Direction

1975
Richard Sylbert

Best Supporting Actor

1975
Jack Warden

Best Writing, Screenplay

1976
Warren Beatty

Articles

Shampoo


By the late 1960's, Warren Beatty was a major player in Hollywood, thanks to the success of Bonnie and Clyde (1967), which he not only starred in, but also produced. As a follow-up, Beatty was interested in doing a film about the era's sexual revolution, specifically about a hairdresser whose promiscuity wrecks his relationships. Beatty and screenwriter Robert Towne had begun working on a script, but disagreed so vehemently about the treatment of the women characters that they gave it up. Beatty was also getting involved in politics, and took time off from filmmaking to work on the 1972 McGovern presidential campaign. By the time he and Towne returned to the idea for the hairdresser film, it had changed dramatically. Shampoo (1975) is a comedy of manners about sex, politics, and power among the rich and jaded of Beverly Hills, set against the backdrop of Election Day, 1968 - the day Richard Nixon was elected president. Beatty plays George, a womanizing beautician, who wants to open his own shop. George beds several women as he seeks his goal, and ends up sadder but not much wiser.

Shampoo was Beatty's film in every way. He came up with the concept, co-authored the screenplay with Towne, and produced. Beatty had considered directing, and although he gave that job to Hal Ashby, everyone involved knew Beatty was the true auteur. Many in Hollywood thought Shampoo was also Beatty's film in another way - the womanizer played by Beatty seemed to some uncomfortably close to the star himself. (The character was actually based on Beverly Hills celebrity hairdresser Jay Sebring, who was murdered along with Sharon Tate and several others by the Manson gang in 1969.) And when Beatty hired his former lover Julie Christie to play his character's former lover, who dumped George because of his promiscuity, the gossip went into overdrive. There were rumors during the filming of Shampoo that Christie and Beatty were back together, that they were fighting on the set, that the love scenes were so steamy that they had to be shot on closed sets. Both during production and while publicizing the film afterwards, Beatty shrewdly fanned the gossip by giving teasing interviews, implying much but saying little. Many, no doubt, went to see Shampoo hoping for a glimpse into the love life of the famous Hollywood Lothario.

Beatty's other leading ladies in Shampoo included Oscar winner Goldie Hawn, who had co-starred with Beatty in $ (1971), and 17-year old Carrie Fisher, appearing in her first film as a rather forward teenager who seduces George. Fisher's mother, Debbie Reynolds, was reportedly not happy that her daughter was playing such a lascivious character.

Lee Grant played Fisher's mother, who is also having an affair with the Beatty character. Grant had been nominated for an Academy Award for her film debut in Detective Story (1951), but her career came to a standstill soon after when she was blacklisted for refusing to testify against her husband before the House Un-American Activities Committee. Grant worked only sporadically until the mid-1960s. Shampoo finally won Grant her Oscar® as Supporting Actress. Jack Warden, who played Grant's husband in Shampoo, was nominated as Supporting Actor, as were the film's art direction and Beatty and Towne's script.

Some critics were offended by Shampoo's frank sexuality, though it's tame by today's standards. Others appreciated it as a sparkling sexual farce, and a sly commentary on a superficial society. Critic Pauline Kael wrote "This was the most virtuoso example of sophisticated, kaleidoscopic farce that American moviemakers had yet come up with; frivolous and funny, it carries a sense of heedless activity, of a craze of dissatisfaction." In the end, it was audiences who made Shampoo a huge hit, and the film's success cemented Beatty's stature as an important filmmaker.

Director: Hal Ashby
Producer: Warren Beatty
Screenplay: Robert Towne, Warren Beatty
Cinematography: Laszlo Kovacs
Editor: Robert C. Jones
Costume Design: Anthea Sylbert
Art Direction: W. Stewart Campbell
Music: Paul Simon
Principal Cast: Warren Beatty (George Roundy), Julie Christie (Jackie Shawn), Goldie Hawn (Jill), Lee Grant (Felicia Carr), Jack Warden (Lester Carr), Tony Bill (Johnny Pope), Carrie Fisher (Lorna), Jay Robinson (Norman).
C-111m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning.

by Margarita Landazuri
Shampoo

Shampoo

By the late 1960's, Warren Beatty was a major player in Hollywood, thanks to the success of Bonnie and Clyde (1967), which he not only starred in, but also produced. As a follow-up, Beatty was interested in doing a film about the era's sexual revolution, specifically about a hairdresser whose promiscuity wrecks his relationships. Beatty and screenwriter Robert Towne had begun working on a script, but disagreed so vehemently about the treatment of the women characters that they gave it up. Beatty was also getting involved in politics, and took time off from filmmaking to work on the 1972 McGovern presidential campaign. By the time he and Towne returned to the idea for the hairdresser film, it had changed dramatically. Shampoo (1975) is a comedy of manners about sex, politics, and power among the rich and jaded of Beverly Hills, set against the backdrop of Election Day, 1968 - the day Richard Nixon was elected president. Beatty plays George, a womanizing beautician, who wants to open his own shop. George beds several women as he seeks his goal, and ends up sadder but not much wiser. Shampoo was Beatty's film in every way. He came up with the concept, co-authored the screenplay with Towne, and produced. Beatty had considered directing, and although he gave that job to Hal Ashby, everyone involved knew Beatty was the true auteur. Many in Hollywood thought Shampoo was also Beatty's film in another way - the womanizer played by Beatty seemed to some uncomfortably close to the star himself. (The character was actually based on Beverly Hills celebrity hairdresser Jay Sebring, who was murdered along with Sharon Tate and several others by the Manson gang in 1969.) And when Beatty hired his former lover Julie Christie to play his character's former lover, who dumped George because of his promiscuity, the gossip went into overdrive. There were rumors during the filming of Shampoo that Christie and Beatty were back together, that they were fighting on the set, that the love scenes were so steamy that they had to be shot on closed sets. Both during production and while publicizing the film afterwards, Beatty shrewdly fanned the gossip by giving teasing interviews, implying much but saying little. Many, no doubt, went to see Shampoo hoping for a glimpse into the love life of the famous Hollywood Lothario. Beatty's other leading ladies in Shampoo included Oscar winner Goldie Hawn, who had co-starred with Beatty in $ (1971), and 17-year old Carrie Fisher, appearing in her first film as a rather forward teenager who seduces George. Fisher's mother, Debbie Reynolds, was reportedly not happy that her daughter was playing such a lascivious character. Lee Grant played Fisher's mother, who is also having an affair with the Beatty character. Grant had been nominated for an Academy Award for her film debut in Detective Story (1951), but her career came to a standstill soon after when she was blacklisted for refusing to testify against her husband before the House Un-American Activities Committee. Grant worked only sporadically until the mid-1960s. Shampoo finally won Grant her Oscar® as Supporting Actress. Jack Warden, who played Grant's husband in Shampoo, was nominated as Supporting Actor, as were the film's art direction and Beatty and Towne's script. Some critics were offended by Shampoo's frank sexuality, though it's tame by today's standards. Others appreciated it as a sparkling sexual farce, and a sly commentary on a superficial society. Critic Pauline Kael wrote "This was the most virtuoso example of sophisticated, kaleidoscopic farce that American moviemakers had yet come up with; frivolous and funny, it carries a sense of heedless activity, of a craze of dissatisfaction." In the end, it was audiences who made Shampoo a huge hit, and the film's success cemented Beatty's stature as an important filmmaker. Director: Hal Ashby Producer: Warren Beatty Screenplay: Robert Towne, Warren Beatty Cinematography: Laszlo Kovacs Editor: Robert C. Jones Costume Design: Anthea Sylbert Art Direction: W. Stewart Campbell Music: Paul Simon Principal Cast: Warren Beatty (George Roundy), Julie Christie (Jackie Shawn), Goldie Hawn (Jill), Lee Grant (Felicia Carr), Jack Warden (Lester Carr), Tony Bill (Johnny Pope), Carrie Fisher (Lorna), Jay Robinson (Norman). C-111m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning. by Margarita Landazuri

Quotes

Trivia

Robert Towne rewrote his screenplay many times, over a period of eight years prior to production.

Producer Jon Peters claimed the lead in film was based on him but it was really based on a mentor of his, Jay Sebring.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter February 11, 1975

Re-released in United States November 2, 2001

Released in United States 1999

Released in United States 2008

Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival (Tributes) April 24-May 8, 2008.

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States Winter February 11, 1975

Re-released in United States November 2, 2001 (Film Forum; New York City)

Released in United States 1999 (Shown in New York City (Film Forum) as part of program "Columbia 75" November 19 - January 13, 1999.)

Released in United States 2008 (Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival (Tributes) April 24-May 8, 2008.)