Wyatt Earp


3h 15m 1994

Brief Synopsis

The life of lawman Wyatt Earp and his famous showdown at the O.K. Corral.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Action
Adventure
Historical
Western
Biography
Period
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
3h 15m

Synopsis

The epic biography of western lawman Wyatt Earp, who at an early age, is taught that nothing matters more than family and the law. He becomes a respected sheriff in Dodge City and Tombstone. Joined by his brothers and Doc Holliday, Earp wages war on the dreaded Clanton and McLaury gangs.

Crew

Todd Adelman

Other

Jennifer Alexander

Costumes

Christopher Alfieri

Production

William Althouse

Other

Peter Alvarez

Props

David Amberik

Driver

Robert W Anderson

Props

J H Arrufat

Sound Editor

James Ashwill

Foley Mixer

Colleen Atwood

Costume Designer

Gregory Avellone

Other

Steve Baer

Swing Gang

Suzi Battaglia

Driver

Lindsay Beamish

Production

Steph Benseman

Production Manager

Stu Bernstein

Sound Editor

Cynthia Black

Costumes

Donna Blau

Assistant Production Accountant

Cha Blevins

Costume Supervisor

Ulli Bonnekamp

Photography

Chris Boradman

Original Music

Kirk Borcherding

Production Associate

Justin Bourret

Apprentice Editor

Richard Bowen

Director Of Photography

John W Brilhante

Sound Recordist

Samuel H Brinson

Props

Ray Brooks

Driver

David Brown

Grip

Phil Brown

Grip

Cindy Burroughs

Craft Service

Billy Burton

Stunts

Rodney Byrd

Effects Assistant

Greg Callas

Construction Coordinator

Chris Cannon

Driver

Desmond Cannon

Assistant Sound Editor

Tony Cappelli

Assistant Sound Editor

Frank Cappiello

Other

Cheryl Carasik

Set Decorator

Andy Carter

Other

Will Cascio

Stunts

Barry Chusid

Set Designer

Art Clever

Foreman

Jim Cody

Apprentice

Denis Cordova

Props

Kevin Costner

Producer

Stacy Courtney

Stunts

Jerry Crespin

Production

Charlie Daboub

Set Designer

Burt Dalton

Special Effects

Raúl Dávalos

Editor

Shad Davis

Production

Stanford A Davis

Driver

Le Dawson

Costume Supervisor

Vince Deamicis

Driver

Brad Dechter

Original Music

Bonita Dehaven

Makeup Artist

Barry Delaney

Costumes

Michael Delheim

Consultant

Vashti Desire

Driver

Kyle Deviendt

Video

Tom Dewitt

Grip

Alan Disler

Assistant Camera Operator

Joe Dorn

Adr Editor

Joe Downey

Stand-In

Michael Dressel

Sound Editor

Bob Dunn

Thanks

Stephen P Dunn

Assistant Director

Rose Echevarria

Driver

Dave Effron

Stunts

Elle Elliott

Hair Stylist

Robert Elsey

Driver

Chandos Erwin

Production

Chris Espeset

Grip

Dale Ettema

Effects Assistant

H. P. Evetts

Stunts

Giovanni Ferrara

Other

Richard Fezzey

Grip

Robert D. Fish

Driver

Alison Fisher

Dialogue Editor

Andy Flores

Other

Anne C. Ford

Assistant Production Accountant

John Forwalter

Props

Dorothy D Fox

Hair Stylist

Ian Fox

Camera Operator

Jessica Gallavan

Adr Supervisor

Kevin M Gannon

Assistant Property Master

Michael R Gannon

Assistant Property Master

Rusty Geller

Steadicam Operator

James M George

Costumes

Jeff Gershman

Assistant Camera Operator

Nerses Gezalyan

Foley Recordist

Hank Giardina

Other

Eric Giese

Production

Gershon Ginsburg

Art Assistant

John Glaeser

Sound

Ben Glass

Photography

Jeff Goldberg

Foreman

Lewis Goldstein

Dialogue Editor

Greg Goossen

Stunts

Dan Gordon

Screenplay

Dan Gordon

Executive Producer

Zak Gordon

Production

Robert Grieve

Sound Editor

Khan Griffith

Other

Michael Grillo

Executive Producer

Michael Grillo

Unit Production Manager

Mark Hadland

Lighting

Rose Hansen

Production

Paul Hargrave

Location Manager

Val Harris

Swing Gang

John O Hartman

Swing Gang

William Hauer

Driver

Rusty Hendrickson

Animal Wrangler

Chris Herrington

Other

Bill Hill

Projectionist

Peter Hirsch

Assistant Director

Mark Hitchler

Foreman

Sonny Hodge

Driver

Tom Hoeck

Other

Richard Hoffenberg

Other

Beau Holden

Assistant

Beau Holden

Stunts

James Newton Howard

Music

James Newton Howard

Original Music

Kanin J. Howell

Stunts

Norman Howell

Stunt Coordinator

Norman Howell

Stunts

Shawn Howell

Stunts

Tricia Howell

Stunts

Kelly Hudson

Other

Dream Quest Images

Special Effects

Ruth Irvine

Assistant

Sally Jackson

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Stephen Janisz

Adr Editor

Ken J Johnson

Sound Effects

Marci R Johnson

Costumes

David Jones

Helicopter Pilot

Karim Jundi

Production

Robert Kaiser

Color Timer

Shannon Kane

Accounting Assistant

Jake Kasdan

Archival Footage

Lawrence Kasdan

Producer

Lawrence Kasdan

Screenplay

Tony Kerum

Caterer

Ian Kincaid

Lighting Technician

Rick Kline

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Kim K Kono

Rigging Gaffer

Kent Kubena

Video

Ernest H Lauterio

Craft Service

Stevie Lazo

Production Accountant

Scott Lewis

Swing Gang

Carol Littleton

Editor

Mitch Lookabaugh

Dolly Grip

Mary B Love

Liaison

Stephanie Lowry

Assistant Sound Editor

Justin Lundin

Wrangler

Maria Manuela Machado

Assistant

Bobby Mackston

Dialogue Editor

Brian Maguire

Driver

Adrienne Manhan

Costumes

Ruby Manis

Costumes

Steve Mann

Sound Editor

Benny Manning

Wrangler

Anthony J Martin

Production

Rick Martin

Foreman

Mike Martinez

Camera

Michael Mason

Music Producer

Bill Masten

Driver

James Matheny

Dialogue Editor

Oscar A Mazzola

Production

Bob Mcdonald

Foreman

Gary Mclarty

Stunts

Moira Mclaughlin

Assistant

Sharon Mcvey

Hair Stylist

Henry Mendoza

Props

David L Merrill

Dolly Grip

Ken Merritt

Driver

Michael Mills

Makeup Supervisor

Ed Mirassou

Props

Darwin Mitchell

Wrangler

Daniel P Moore

Video Assist/Playback

Richard Mosier

Steadicam Operator

Larry Motes

Wrangler

Shawn Murphy

Sound Mixer

John Murray

Foley

Don Myers

Effects Assistant

Tom Nead

Other

David J Negron

Storyboard Artist

Bob Nickloff

Props

Dan O'connell

Foley

Kevin O'connell

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Charles Okun

Unit Production Manager

Charles Okun

Executive Producer

David Olson

Music

Jennifer Owensby

Assistant

Marty Paich

Music Conductor

H Charles Parrish

Stand-In

F X Perez

Makeup Artist

Bill Petrotta

Property Master

Victor Petrotta

Assistant Property Master

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Action
Adventure
Historical
Western
Biography
Period
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
3h 15m

Award Nominations

Best Cinematography

1994

Articles

Wyatt Earp on DVD


Ten years after its theatrical release met with middling box-office and critical response, writer/director Lawrence Kasdan's epic-length rumination on the life and times of the legendary Western lawman Wyatt Earp (1994) has finally made its debut on DVD, presented in a double-disc package by Warner Home Video. As a film, its production detail is meticulous, and it never seems to drag despite its three-hour plus running time. By the same token, though, it harkens back to many other Western opuses that have gone before, and ultimately fails to leave the same sort of indelible impression.

There may not a figure from the American West that Hollywood has revisited so frequently, and Kasdan made the ambitious choice to follow his story from his youth, and chronicle the forces that forged his courage and hardened his soul. His scenario opens on a teenaged Kansas farmboy ready to bolt the homestead and join his older brothers in the Civil War, until his stern attorney father (Gene Hackman) reminds him that duty begins with family. Still, the elder Earp is hardly immune from wanderlust himself, and Wyatt gets his first taste of the frontier when the family makes a postwar pilgrimage to California by covered wagon.

The now-grown Wyatt (Kevin Costner) returns east for a clerkship with his judge grandfather, and to woo and wed his childhood sweetheart (Annabeth Gish). The young couple's idyll is dashed when, carrying their unborn child, she dies of typhoid. The devastated Earp drifts into alcoholism and thievery, narrowly avoiding hanging after jumping bail posted by his father. Making his way back to the territories, Wyatt supports himself through buffalo hunting, taking as associates the brothers Bat and Ed Masterson (Tom Sizemore, Bill Pullman).

Earp finds his true calling when he brings a rowdy drunk to heel and gets a deputy's commission for his trouble. His reputation quickly grows to where he's hired to bring order to the famously corrupt Dodge City, which he does in short order with the aid of his brothers and the Mastersons. During this time, Earp also made a friend and ally of the notorious dentist-turned-gambler Doc Holliday (Dennis Quaid).

Wyatt presently sets his sights on the town of Tombstone, Arizona, hopeful of the prospective security that its burgeoning silver mining could provide for his extended family. It isn't long before the Earps return to the way of the gun, and the stage is set for the familiar confrontation with the Clantons at the O.K. Corral. Costner's patented earnestness suits the role of the hardened, loyal marshal, and the attention lavished on the project by Kasdan and crew is obvious. While the end result is diverting, it borrows far too many cues from the works of Ford and others to create a genuinely lasting impression.

The supporting cast is both large and gifted, so much so there isn't enough screen time to go around, even in a film of this length. Standouts include Mare Winningham as the prostitute who becomes Wyatt's common-law wife; Joanna Going as the Jewish actress who'd ultimately wind up as his lifemate; Catherine O'Hara and JoBeth Williams as the sisters-in-law resentful of his hold upon their husbands; and Isabella Rossellini, ultimately underused as Holliday's woman, Big Nosed Kate. Of the supporting turns, Quaid's was easily the most flavorful. Frighteningly gaunt--the actor purportedly dropped 40 pounds in order to portray the tubercular gunslinger-- Quaid managed to walk off with every scene in which he appeared.

Warners opted to split the presentation of Wyatt Earp across two discs, and it was a commendable decision, as it freed up enough bitrate to do justice to the visual aspects that comprise the film's primary virtues. From Owen Roizman's lush cinematography to Ida Random's period-perfect production design, the crew's efforts are captured in a strikingly crisp 2:35.1 widescreen transfer. The Dolby Surround 5.1 audio does justice to the considerable gunplay and James Newton Howard's affecting score.

For a multi-disc presentation, the extras package on Wyatt Earp has a disappointingly sparse feel. The menu is headed by a pair of making-of documentaries: It Happened That Way, a 14-minute presentation prepared for the DVD release, and Wyatt Earp: Walk With A Legend, a 22-minute TV special created to promote the '94 theatrical release. The new documentary seems to have been largely cobbled together with unused interview footage shot for the latter, which, in turn, is pretty much a standard puff piece with cast and crew sharing war stories. Next up are 11 "lifted scenes" which run an aggregate 18 minutes, ostensibly the footage contained in Kasdan's 212-minute director's cut of the film. It's somewhat odd that Warner would elect not to simply present the longer cut for this special edition. The theatrical trailer completes the add-ons.

For more information about Wyatt Earp, visit Warner Video. To order Wyatt Earp, go to TCM Shopping.

by Jay S. Steinberg
Wyatt Earp On Dvd

Wyatt Earp on DVD

Ten years after its theatrical release met with middling box-office and critical response, writer/director Lawrence Kasdan's epic-length rumination on the life and times of the legendary Western lawman Wyatt Earp (1994) has finally made its debut on DVD, presented in a double-disc package by Warner Home Video. As a film, its production detail is meticulous, and it never seems to drag despite its three-hour plus running time. By the same token, though, it harkens back to many other Western opuses that have gone before, and ultimately fails to leave the same sort of indelible impression. There may not a figure from the American West that Hollywood has revisited so frequently, and Kasdan made the ambitious choice to follow his story from his youth, and chronicle the forces that forged his courage and hardened his soul. His scenario opens on a teenaged Kansas farmboy ready to bolt the homestead and join his older brothers in the Civil War, until his stern attorney father (Gene Hackman) reminds him that duty begins with family. Still, the elder Earp is hardly immune from wanderlust himself, and Wyatt gets his first taste of the frontier when the family makes a postwar pilgrimage to California by covered wagon. The now-grown Wyatt (Kevin Costner) returns east for a clerkship with his judge grandfather, and to woo and wed his childhood sweetheart (Annabeth Gish). The young couple's idyll is dashed when, carrying their unborn child, she dies of typhoid. The devastated Earp drifts into alcoholism and thievery, narrowly avoiding hanging after jumping bail posted by his father. Making his way back to the territories, Wyatt supports himself through buffalo hunting, taking as associates the brothers Bat and Ed Masterson (Tom Sizemore, Bill Pullman). Earp finds his true calling when he brings a rowdy drunk to heel and gets a deputy's commission for his trouble. His reputation quickly grows to where he's hired to bring order to the famously corrupt Dodge City, which he does in short order with the aid of his brothers and the Mastersons. During this time, Earp also made a friend and ally of the notorious dentist-turned-gambler Doc Holliday (Dennis Quaid). Wyatt presently sets his sights on the town of Tombstone, Arizona, hopeful of the prospective security that its burgeoning silver mining could provide for his extended family. It isn't long before the Earps return to the way of the gun, and the stage is set for the familiar confrontation with the Clantons at the O.K. Corral. Costner's patented earnestness suits the role of the hardened, loyal marshal, and the attention lavished on the project by Kasdan and crew is obvious. While the end result is diverting, it borrows far too many cues from the works of Ford and others to create a genuinely lasting impression. The supporting cast is both large and gifted, so much so there isn't enough screen time to go around, even in a film of this length. Standouts include Mare Winningham as the prostitute who becomes Wyatt's common-law wife; Joanna Going as the Jewish actress who'd ultimately wind up as his lifemate; Catherine O'Hara and JoBeth Williams as the sisters-in-law resentful of his hold upon their husbands; and Isabella Rossellini, ultimately underused as Holliday's woman, Big Nosed Kate. Of the supporting turns, Quaid's was easily the most flavorful. Frighteningly gaunt--the actor purportedly dropped 40 pounds in order to portray the tubercular gunslinger-- Quaid managed to walk off with every scene in which he appeared. Warners opted to split the presentation of Wyatt Earp across two discs, and it was a commendable decision, as it freed up enough bitrate to do justice to the visual aspects that comprise the film's primary virtues. From Owen Roizman's lush cinematography to Ida Random's period-perfect production design, the crew's efforts are captured in a strikingly crisp 2:35.1 widescreen transfer. The Dolby Surround 5.1 audio does justice to the considerable gunplay and James Newton Howard's affecting score. For a multi-disc presentation, the extras package on Wyatt Earp has a disappointingly sparse feel. The menu is headed by a pair of making-of documentaries: It Happened That Way, a 14-minute presentation prepared for the DVD release, and Wyatt Earp: Walk With A Legend, a 22-minute TV special created to promote the '94 theatrical release. The new documentary seems to have been largely cobbled together with unused interview footage shot for the latter, which, in turn, is pretty much a standard puff piece with cast and crew sharing war stories. Next up are 11 "lifted scenes" which run an aggregate 18 minutes, ostensibly the footage contained in Kasdan's 212-minute director's cut of the film. It's somewhat odd that Warner would elect not to simply present the longer cut for this special edition. The theatrical trailer completes the add-ons. For more information about Wyatt Earp, visit Warner Video. To order Wyatt Earp, go to TCM Shopping. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated for the 1994 Golden Reel Award by the Motion Picture Sound Editors.

Owen Roizman was nominated in the feature film category of the Outstanding Achievement Awards (1994) sponsored by the American Society of Cinematographers.

Released in United States 1994

Released in United States on Video May 2, 2006

Released in United States September 1994

Released in United States Summer June 24, 1994

Shown at Venice Film Festival (out of competition) September 1-12, 1994.

Mary Steenburgen was replaced by Isabella Rossellini.

Began shooting July 19, 1993.

Completed shooting December 15, 1993.

Project was reportedly originally planned as a ten-hour mini-series.

Released in United States 1994 (Shown at AFI Film Festival (opening night / International Erotic Tales) in Los Angeles June 23 - July 7, 1994.)

Released in United States on Video May 2, 2006

Released in United States Summer June 24, 1994

Released in United States September 1994 (Shown at Venice Film Festival (out of competition) September 1-12, 1994.)