Blues Brothers 2000


2h 3m 1998

Brief Synopsis

Eighteen years after the original "mission from God," Elwood Blues is released from prison and sets out on the road with an 11-year-old orphan, determined to reform the old band and raise funds for hospital's children's wing. They're soon in trouble--pursued by Elwood's upstanding police officer cou

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Chicago, Illinois, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 3m

Synopsis

Eighteen years after the original "mission from God," Elwood Blues is released from prison and sets out on the road with an 11-year-old orphan, determined to reform the old band and raise funds for hospital's children's wing. They're soon in trouble--pursued by Elwood's upstanding police officer cousin Cabel, the Chicago branch of the Russian mob, and a rabidly right-wing militia group.

Cast

Jason Meloche

Gloria Ridgeway

Isaac Hayes

John Popper

Jenni Burke

Peter K Radcliffe

Gina Wilkinson

Fred Keeler

Alfie Chieffallo

Andrew Bortkiewicz

Warren Belle

Danny Ray

Susie Dias

Jake Simons

Liz Gordon

Vicki Galati

Jeff Morris

Michael Bodnar

Lori Maraglia

Cheryl Quiacos

Jillian Hart

Donna Christo

Erykah Badu

Alan Rubin

Dunne Murphy

Bily Preston

Joe Morton

Lonnie Brooks

Himself

Howard Hoover

Nancy Mcalear

Shann Johnson

Jason Mcdonald

Ingrid Abbot

Melanie Fortier

Charlie Musselwhite

Melanie Boyko

James Brown

Patrice Goodman

Gavin Hope

Clarence Clemons

Lou Rawls

Sam Moore

Saidah Baba Talibah

Steve Lawrence

Anindita Banerjee

Iggy Simmons

Frank Oz

Lou Marini

Sandi Ross

Lea Creswell

Kari Bodrug

Teri Keri

Richard Kruk

Rhett George

Nicola Pantin

J Evan Bonifant

Darrell Hammond

Nicholas Rice

Chandler Kinchla

John Lyons

Bo Diddley

Cherilee Taylor

Jodi Screpnek

Karen Holness

Bobby Sheehan

B. B. King

Lara Rodin

Birch Johnson

Travis Tritt

Natalie Sebastian

Lisa Collins

Leon Pendarvis

Samantha Adamson

Heather Cherron

Aimee Mckenzie

Gary "u. S." Bonds

Demo Cates

Angela Desario

Kimberly Pilc

Mary Paterson

Christine Nowland

Brenda Hill

Jennie Ford

Anne-marie Wood

Tom Malone

Jennifer Irwin

Shiraz Tayyeb

Ted Banfalvi

Susan Davy

Kim Roberts

Lena Vajakas

Christopher Marshall

Joshua Redman

Matt Murphy

Roxanne Sorias

Walter Levine

Brandi Marie Ward

Candide Franklyn

Shelly Marriage

Jonny Lang

Sharon Brown

Kathleen Freeman

Danelle Smith

Jason Yorke

Patrick Patterson

Garfield Lemonius

Gloria Slade

Jan-mari Resner

George Sperdakos

Ronnie Pulval

Wilson Pickett

Tommy Mcdonnell

Theresa Runstedtler

Shawn Byfield

Jon Faddis

Simmi Raymond

John Goodman

Siona Jackson

Donald Dunn

Jimmie Vaughan

Eric Clapton

Andrea Kovesdi

Nia Peeples

Arthur Lee Rose

Koko Taylor

Justine Campbell

Jeff Baxter

Carla Bennett

Louise St Cyr

Steve Potts

Willie Weeks

Claudia Openkelder

Jeff Duke

Soo Garay

Gracie Ridgeway

Richard Smith

Karen Burthwright

Paul Shaffer

Wally High

Victor Pedtrchenko

Monique Kurnath

Rochelle Forland

Dorin Grunwald

Janet Zenik

Steve Cropper

Eddie Floyd

Kwame Mensah

Rhonda Towells

Lisa Ferguson

Denosh Bennett

Igor Syyouk

Dan Aykroyd

Tracey Champagne

Christopher Medina

Kelly Gifford

Aretha Franklin

Prakash John

Willie Hall

Troy Terashita

Slavko Hochevar

Grover Washington

Vanessa Cobham

Cindy Willems

Keri Tkacz

Nina Hilgar

John T Davis

Tom Davis

Marianne Mccord

Max Landis

Michelle Digioacchino

Charlene Anthony

Esther Ridgeway

Jacques Dejohnette

Stevie Winwood

Junior Wells

Himself

Crew

Gary Alexander

Rerecording

Rick Avery

Stunt Coordinator

Charles Axton

Song

Dan Aykroyd

From Story

Dan Aykroyd

Song Performer

Dan Aykroyd

Screenplay

Dan Aykroyd

Producer

Erykah Badu

Song Performer

Chris Baird

Associate Editor

Benjamin Beardwood

Dialogue Editor

Dale Beldin

Editor

Leslie Belzberg

Producer

John Benson

Foley Editor

Elmer Bernstein

Song

Les Bernstein

Director Of Photography

Brian Bero

Project Manager

Mark Biancaniello

Animal Trainer

Simon Board

Assistant Director

J Evan Bonifant

Song Performer

Gary Bourgeois

Rerecording

Kelly Brine

Storyboard Artist

Bill Brodie

Production Designer

Lonnie Brooks

Song Performer

Michael Broomberg

Foley Artist

Reid Burns

Visual Effects

Paul Butterfield Blues Band

Song Performer

Tracy Byrd

Song

Tracy Byrd

Song Performer

Gilbert Caple

Song

Lorraine Cardinal

Visual Effects

Marsha Carrington

Animator

Clarence Carter

Song

Gary Childs

Other

Ross Clydesdale

Casting

Angelo Colavecchia

Camera Operator

Joanna Colbert

Casting

Judi Cooper-sealy

Hairdresser

Rich Cowan

Assistant Director

Matt Creteau

Art Department

Steve Cropper

Song

Gerrit Dangremond

Camera Operator

Marcus Daniels

Song

Joe Earle

Sound Effects Editor

Leonard Feather

Song

Alice Ferrier

Production Coordinator

Tyrone Fitzgerald

Song

Eddie Floyd

Song

Eddie Floyd

Song Performer

Aretha Franklin

Song Performer

Leigh French

Adr

Kerry Gammili

Other

Sandy Garcia

Foley Recordist

Glen Gauthier

Sound Mixer

Grace Gilroy

Production Manager

Grace Gilroy

Associate Producer

T G Glazer

Location Manager

Mishell Glockler

Production Coordinator

Harvey Goldberg

Music

John Goodman

Song Performer

Marilyn Graf

Foley Mixer

Nicholas Gravenites

Song

Patricia Green

Makeup Artist

Pete Gregory

Other

Dennis Grisco

Animal Trainer

Frank Guida

Song

Rick Hall

Song

Darrell Hanzalik

Adr Supervisor

Joel Harlow

Art Director

Walter Hart

Visual Effects Supervisor

Mark L Hartman

Other

Jim Hebenstreit

Adr Editor

Scott Hecker

Sound Editor

Isabel Heimerdinger

Animator

Ann Henshaw

Wardrobe

David Herrigton

Director Of Photography

David Herrington

Director Of Photography

Ellen Heuer

Foley Artist

Martin Hilke

Visual Effects

Keith Hlady

Camera Operator

Perry Hoffman

Camera Operator

Nori Honda

Art Department

Son House

Song

Diane Hughes

Art Director

Peter Humes

Song

Alan Jackson

Song

Booker T. Jones

Song

Stan Jones

Song

Don Julien

Assistant Director

Katherine Kean

Visual Effects

Mandy Ketcheson

Assistant Director

Vince Lamarsh

Animal Trainer

John Landis

Theme Lyrics

John Landis

Producer

John Landis

From Story

John Landis

Screenplay

Jonny Lang

Song Performer

Keith Large

Location Manager

Barry Lather

Choreographer

Donovan Leitch

Song

Gary Lewis

Dialogue Editor

Taj Mahal

Song Performer

Martin Malivoire

Special Effects Coordinator

Jon Mallard

Assistant Director

Deadric Malone

Song

Henry Mancini

Song

Paul Marcus

Unit Production Manager

Jeff Matakovich

Digital Effects Supervisor

Chips Moman

Song

Juan Son Montuno

Animator

Sam Moore

Song Performer

Art Morrel

Visual Effects

Joe Morton

Song Performer

Frank Munnings

Song

Leroy Munnings

Song

Raphael Munnings

Song

Matt Murphy

Song

Matt Murphy

Song Performer

John Murray

Foley Editor

Deborah Nadoolman

Costume Designer

Ian Nelmes

Scenic Artist

Sandy Nelson

Song

Mark Nesler

Song

Lloyd Newman

Song

Brian Thomas Nist

Sound Effects Editor

Tony Noel

Visual Effects

Eric A Norris

Sound Effects Editor

Ralph Osborn

Dialogue Editor

Richard Parker

Animal Wrangler

Wilson Pickett

Song Performer

Rudolph Pinder

Song

Richard A Podolor

Song

John Popper

Song

John Popper

Song Performer

Otis Redding

Song

Allison Reid

Stunt Coordinator

Mack Rice

Song

Dug Rotstein

Script Supervisor

Joseph Royster

Song

Alison Sanford

Other

Joey Scott

Song

Paul Shaffer

Song Performer

Paul Shaffer

Music Producer

Paul Shaffer

Music

Steve Shewchuk

Set Decorator

Tim Singh

Assistant Director

Jerry Smith

Song

Buffy Snyder

Costume Supervisor

Lewie Steinberg

Song

Fred Steiner

Song

Derek Stephenson

Scenic Artist

Sean Taylor

Production Coordinator

Wilbur Terrell

Song

Clive Thomasson

Set Decorator

Ben Vaughn

Song Performer

Ben Vaughn

Song

Junior Wells

Song Performer

Gord White

Set Designer

Sonny Boy Williamson

Song

Dan Yarhi

Art Director

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Chicago, Illinois, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 3m

Articles

Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)


Elmer Bernstein, the film composer who created unforgettable music for such classics as The Magnificent Seven, To Kill a Mockingbird, and won his only Academy Award for Thoroughly Modern Millie, died of natural causes at his Ojai, California home on August 17. He was 82.

Elmer Bernstein, who was not related to Leonard Bernstein, was born on August 4, 1922, in New York City. He displayed a talent in music at a very young age, and was given a scholarship to study piano at Juilliard when he was only 12. He entered New York University in 1939, where he majored in music education. After graduating in 1942, he joined the Army Air Corps, where he remained throughout World War II, mostly working on scores for propaganda films. It was around this time he became interested in film scoring when he went to see William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), a film whose score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, a man Bernstein idolized as the ideal film composer.

Bernstein, who originally intended to be a concert pianist and gave several performances in New York after being discharged from military service, decided to relocate to Hollywood in 1950. He did his first score for the football film Saturday's Hero (1950), and then proved his worth with his trenchant, moody music for the Joan Crawford vehicle Sudden Fear (1952). Rumors of his "communist" leanings came to surface at this time, and, feeling the effects of the blacklist, he found himself scoring such cheesy fare as Robot Monster; Cat Women of the Moon (both 1953); and Miss Robin Caruso (1954).

Despite his politics, Otto Preminger hired him to do the music for The Man With the Golden Arm, (1955) in which Frank Sinatra played a heroin-addicted jazz musician. Fittingly, Bernstein used some memorable jazz motifs for the film and his fine scoring put him back on the map. It prompted the attention of Cecil B. De Mille, who had Bernstein replace the ailing Victor Young on The Ten Commandments (1956). His thundering, heavily orchestrated score perfectly suite the bombastic epic, and he promptly earned his first Oscar® nod for music.

After The Ten Commandments (1956), Bernstein continued to distinguish himself in a row of fine films: The Rainmaker (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Some Came Running (1958), The Magnificent Seven (a most memorable galloping march, 1960); To Kill a Mockingbird (unique in its use of single piano notes and haunting use of a flute, 1962); Hud (1963); earned a deserved Academy Award for the delightful, "flapper" music for the Julie Andrews period comedy Thoroughly Modern Mille (1967), and True Grit (1969).

His career faltered by the '80s though, as he did some routine Bill Murray comedies: Meatballs (1980) and Stripes (1981). But then director John Landis had Bernstein write the sumptuous score for his comedy Trading Places (1983), and Bernstein soon found himself back in the game. He then graced the silver screen for a few more years composing some terrific pieces for such popular commercial hits as My Left Foot (1989), A River Runs Through It (1992) and The Age of Innocence (1993). Far From Heaven, his final feature film score, received an Oscar® nomination for Best Score in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Eve; sons Peter and Gregory; daughters Emilie and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)

Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)

Elmer Bernstein, the film composer who created unforgettable music for such classics as The Magnificent Seven, To Kill a Mockingbird, and won his only Academy Award for Thoroughly Modern Millie, died of natural causes at his Ojai, California home on August 17. He was 82. Elmer Bernstein, who was not related to Leonard Bernstein, was born on August 4, 1922, in New York City. He displayed a talent in music at a very young age, and was given a scholarship to study piano at Juilliard when he was only 12. He entered New York University in 1939, where he majored in music education. After graduating in 1942, he joined the Army Air Corps, where he remained throughout World War II, mostly working on scores for propaganda films. It was around this time he became interested in film scoring when he went to see William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), a film whose score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, a man Bernstein idolized as the ideal film composer. Bernstein, who originally intended to be a concert pianist and gave several performances in New York after being discharged from military service, decided to relocate to Hollywood in 1950. He did his first score for the football film Saturday's Hero (1950), and then proved his worth with his trenchant, moody music for the Joan Crawford vehicle Sudden Fear (1952). Rumors of his "communist" leanings came to surface at this time, and, feeling the effects of the blacklist, he found himself scoring such cheesy fare as Robot Monster; Cat Women of the Moon (both 1953); and Miss Robin Caruso (1954). Despite his politics, Otto Preminger hired him to do the music for The Man With the Golden Arm, (1955) in which Frank Sinatra played a heroin-addicted jazz musician. Fittingly, Bernstein used some memorable jazz motifs for the film and his fine scoring put him back on the map. It prompted the attention of Cecil B. De Mille, who had Bernstein replace the ailing Victor Young on The Ten Commandments (1956). His thundering, heavily orchestrated score perfectly suite the bombastic epic, and he promptly earned his first Oscar® nod for music. After The Ten Commandments (1956), Bernstein continued to distinguish himself in a row of fine films: The Rainmaker (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Some Came Running (1958), The Magnificent Seven (a most memorable galloping march, 1960); To Kill a Mockingbird (unique in its use of single piano notes and haunting use of a flute, 1962); Hud (1963); earned a deserved Academy Award for the delightful, "flapper" music for the Julie Andrews period comedy Thoroughly Modern Mille (1967), and True Grit (1969). His career faltered by the '80s though, as he did some routine Bill Murray comedies: Meatballs (1980) and Stripes (1981). But then director John Landis had Bernstein write the sumptuous score for his comedy Trading Places (1983), and Bernstein soon found himself back in the game. He then graced the silver screen for a few more years composing some terrific pieces for such popular commercial hits as My Left Foot (1989), A River Runs Through It (1992) and The Age of Innocence (1993). Far From Heaven, his final feature film score, received an Oscar® nomination for Best Score in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Eve; sons Peter and Gregory; daughters Emilie and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States May 1998

Released in United States on Video August 4, 1998

Released in United States Winter February 6, 1998

Shown at Cannes Film Festival (Opening Night - out of competition) May 13-24, 1998.

Sequel to "The Blues Brothers" (USA/1980), directed by John Landis and starring John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd.

James Belushi was previously attached to costar but left the project in May 1996.

Began shooting June 3, 1997.

Completed shooting September 11, 1997.

Actor and blues legend Junior Wells died January 1998.

Released in United States Winter February 6, 1998

Released in United States May 1998 (Shown at Cannes Film Festival (Opening Night - out of competition) May 13-24, 1998.)

Released in United States on Video August 4, 1998