The Mothman Prophecies


1h 59m 2002

Brief Synopsis

When John Klein, a respected Washington Post journalist, and his wife Mary find the dream house they have been hunting for, life could hardly get better. Then on their joyful ride home the dream is shattered when Mary crashes the car and is killed. While removing Mary's possessions from the hospital, John discovers a sketchpad covered with odd drawings, variations of the same eerie apparition. John is haunted by the unsettling images. One night, while driving from Washington, John loses his way and ends up on a deserted country highway in Point Pleasant, West Virginia -- four hundred miles from where he thought he was. When John decides to stay in Point Pleasant to explore the reports of unexplained phenomena in the town, he soon realizes that they may all be related - not just to each other, but also to the strange sketches Mary had been obsessively drawing just hours before her death.

Film Details

Also Known As
Mothman Prophecies
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Thriller
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
2002
Distribution Company
Screen Gems
Location
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 59m

Synopsis

When John Klein, a respected Washington Post journalist, and his wife Mary find the dream house they have been hunting for, life could hardly get better. Then on their joyful ride home the dream is shattered when Mary crashes the car and is killed. While removing Mary's possessions from the hospital, John discovers a sketchpad covered with odd drawings, variations of the same eerie apparition. John is haunted by the unsettling images. One night, while driving from Washington, John loses his way and ends up on a deserted country highway in Point Pleasant, West Virginia -- four hundred miles from where he thought he was. When John decides to stay in Point Pleasant to explore the reports of unexplained phenomena in the town, he soon realizes that they may all be related - not just to each other, but also to the strange sketches Mary had been obsessively drawing just hours before her death.

Crew

Louis Joseph Abeln

Scenic Artist

Matthew Adams

Rotoscope Animator

Wendy Cyresse Allen

Production Assistant

David T. Altenau

Cg Supervisor

Teresa Alvis

Accounting Assistant

Jonathan Alvord

Avid Editor

J. Todd Anderson

Storyboard Artist

Robin Anderson

Craft Service

Alexander Andres

Assistant Camera

Tony Angelo

Greensman

Jonathan Ankeny

Carpenter

Dennis Antosik

Lighting Technician

Miranda Ardary

Office Production Assistant

Chris Arvan

Music

Orlando Ashley

Other

James Bailey

Foley Artist

Danielle Baker

Coordinator

Joshua A. Baker

Location Assistant

Jeffrey Baksinski

Cgi Artist

Mark Barill

Gang Boss

Lynn Basas

Cgi Artist

Brian Basham

Adr

Robert Batha

Sound Editor

Dan Beals

Set Production Assistant

Barry Beaulac

Special Effects Technician

Jeff Becker

Chief Lighting Technician

Ron Bedrosian

Adr Mixer

Donna Belajac

Local Casting

David A Belasco

Driver

Greg Bell

Location Assistant

Jennifer M Bell

Hair Stylist

Mike Bellamy

Colorist

Robert Bender

On-Set Dresser

Rick Benoit

Visual Effects

Shiloh Benton

Set Production Assistant

Mike Benzing

Swing Gang

Brian Berdan

Editor

Cori Beredino

Coordinator

Jill Berger

3-D Artist

Jude Berrick

Special Effects Technician

Jesse Best

Office Production Assistant

Josh Bleckner

Grip

Laura Mae Bobick

Loader

Johan Boegli

Production Assistant

Rozzanna Bonesso

Office Production Assistant

Richard Bonker

Scenic Artist

Michael Booker

Rigging Grip

Kathryn A Borland

Gang Boss

Bill Boscia

Assistant

David Bostic

Driver

Brett Botula

Location Manager

Brigitte Bourque

Digital Effects

Tommy Boyer

Costumer

Lisa Bradley

Construction

Kevin C Brady

Special Effects Technician

Glenn Branca

Music

Dennis J. Braun

Transportation Co-Captain

Shawn J. Broes

Sound

Craig Brown

Location Assistant

James Bruner

Driver

Jarrett Buba

Lighting Technician

Paul Bucciarelli

Associate To Director

Robert Buncher

Scenic Artist

William Buterbaugh

Construction

John Butler

Special Effects Technician

Brian Buzzelli

Grip

Kelly Cabral

Sound Editor

Allison Cahill

Set Production Assistant

Steve N Cainas

Production Coordinator

Wayne Calder

Stand-In

Robert Carlson

Assistant Camera

Meghan Carrey

Production Assistant

Roderick R Carter

Makeup Artist

Daniel Casey

Video

Jack Cervenak

Security

Ray Cervenak

Security

Renee Chamblin

Digital Effects Artist

John Champion

On-Set Dresser

Nicolas Charuet

Grip

Winnie Cheng

Post-Production Coordinator

Pete Chesney Jr.

Special Effects Technician

Peter Chesney

Special Effects Supervisor

Tom Chesney

Special Effects Technician

Mark Hunshik Choi

Sound Effects Editor

Luann Claps

Makeup Artist

Kevin C Clark

Visual Effects Editor

Steve Cohagan

Chief Lighting Technician

Steve Cohen

Best Boy

Steven B. Cohen

Consultant

Adrian Colbert

Visual Effects

Diane Collins

Costumer

Robert Coquia

Visual Effects

David Coralnick

Apprentice

Kimberly Shriver Covate

Digital Effects

Brian Crane

Best Boy

Jeanna Crawford

Production Assistant

Alan Cross

Other

Stephen Crowley

Chief Lighting Technician

Eric Vincent Cruse

Grip

Benjamin Cuenod

Animator

James Cunic

Driver

Mark Curry

Music Editor

Charlie Curtis

Music

Pud Cusack

Sound Mixer

Darien D'alfonso

Scenic Artist

Peter Dacey

Assistant Camera

Bill Dalzell

On-Set Dresser

Derek Dalzell

Swing Gang

Mitch Davis

Music

Alana M Degregory

Production

John Dellich

Production Assistant

Foster Denker

Best Boy

Ralph Denson

Digital Effects

Daniel Deschamps

Key Grip

Kyle Devriendt

Visual Effects

Eric Dilucente

Lighting Technician

Joe Dishner

Assistant Director

Joe Dishner

Unit Production Manager

Laurie Dodsworth

Accountant

Fred Donatelli

On-Set Dresser

Regis G Donehue

Rigging Grip

Eddy Donno

Stunt Player

Scott Dougherty

Visual Effects Producer

Gilbert Draper

Modelmaker

Steven Drellich

Camera Operator

Denny Dressler

Office Production Assistant

Joline Drylie

Scenic Artist

Dennis Dubart

Scenic Artist

Roderic Duff

Special Effects Foreman

Rich E. Cordobes

Special Effects Technician

Chip Eccles

Construction

Analeisa Ecker

Set Production Assistant

Ray Edwards

Rigging Grip

Katharina Eggmann

Casting Associate

Kenny Endoso

Stunt Player

Glen Engels

Grip

John Evans

Lighting Technician

Michael Everett

Gaffer

Guy Paul Faulkner

Construction

Thomas Feeney

Driver

Michael L. Fink

Visual Effects

Bart Flaherty

Grip

Christina Flanagan

Craft Service

Paul Flinchbaugh

Sound Editor

Jennifer Fong

Producer

Douglas Fox

Property Master

Michelle Fox

Modelmaker

Jason Free

Associate Producer

Bradley Fulford

Scenic Artist

Kelly Fuller

Coordinator

Warren Fuller

Digital Effects

Patricia A Fullerton

Script Supervisor

Vijoy Gaddipati

Software Engineer

Rj Gallagher

Driver

Eileen Garrigan

Charge Scenic Painter

Tom Garrignan

Property Master

Anna Geyer

Rerecording

Larry Geyer

Assistant

Tim Gibbons

Digital Effects

Gary W Goldstein

Producer

Grant Grabowski

Production Coordinator

Megan Graham

On-Set Dresser

Phil Graham

Software Engineer

Timothy B Graham

Special Effects Foreman

Robert H Grasmere

Unit Director

Robert H Grasmere

Assistant Director

Robert H Grasmere

Special Effects Supervisor

Robert H Grasmere

Visual Effects Supervisor

Paula A Gregg

Craft Service

Laurah Grijalva

Modelmaker

Adrienne Gruben

Associate Producer

Andrew Grush

Music

Richard Guinness

Grip

Donn Gunnett

Modelmaker

Brian Gunter

Chief Lighting Technician

Glen Gustafson

Visual Effects

Mindy Hall

Makeup Artist

Douglas E. Hansen

Finance Manager

Hacene Haouas

Modelmaker

Tom Harper

Stunt Player

Barbara Harris

Voice Casting

William J Hart

Driver

Richard Hatem

Screenplay

Todd Hatfield

Scenic Artist

Barbara J Hause

Wardrobe Supervisor

Jim Heastings

Carpenter

Jim Heastings

Special Effects Technician

Don Hedenburg

Scenic Artist

Steve Henderson

Medic

Mark Heyburn

Caterer

Sarah Higgins

Special Effects Foreman

Martin Hilke

Digital Effects

Chris Hinzman

Production Assistant

John Hockridge

Assistant Director

Christian P Hoerger

Driver

David Hoffman

Extras Casting Assistant

Justin Hogan

Assistant

Andrew Honacker

Visual Effects

Eric Hood

Greensman

Richard Hoover

Production Designer

Film Details

Also Known As
Mothman Prophecies
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Thriller
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
2002
Distribution Company
Screen Gems
Location
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 59m

Articles

Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)


Sir Alan Bates, the versatile British actor, who held a distinguished career on both stage and screen, via a string of outstanding roles in both classical (Shakespeare, Chekhov, Ibsen) and contemporary (Pinter, Osborne, Stoppard) drama, died of pancreatic cancer on December 27th in London. He was 69.

Born Alan Arthur Bates on February 17th, 1934 in Derbyshire, England, Bates was the son of amateur musicians who wanted their son to become a concert pianist, but the young man had other ambitions, bluntly declaring to his parents that he had his sights set on an acting career when he was still in secondary school. He eventually earned a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, but had his career briefly interrupted with a two-year stint in the Royal Air Force. Soon after his discharge, Bates immediately joined the new English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre and by 1955 he had found steady stage work in London's West End theatre district.

The following year, Bates made a notable mark in English theatre circles when he starred as Cliff Lewis in John Osborne's charging drama about a disaffected, working-class British youth in Look Back in Anger. Bates' enormous stage presence along with his brooding good looks and youthfulness (he was only 22 at the time of the play's run) made him a star and promised great things for his future.

Four years later, Bates made a solid film debut in Tony Richardson's The Entertainer (1960) as the son of a failing seaside entertainer, played by Sir Laurence Olivier. Yet it would be his next two films that would leave an indelible impression in '60s British cinema; Bryan Forbes' Whistle Down the Wind (1961) and John Schlesinger's A Kind of Loving (1962). Bates' performances as a murderer on the lam who finds solace at a farm house in the company of children in the former, and a young working-class husband who struggles with his identity in a loveless marriage in the latter, were such finely nuanced portrayals of loners coping with an oppressive social order that he struck a chord with both audiences and critics alike. Soon, Bates was considered a key actor in the "angry young men" movement of the decade that included Albert Finney and Tom Courtney.

For the next ten years, Bates simply moved from strength to strength as he chose film roles that both highlighted his range and raised his stock as an international celebrity: reprising his stage role as the brutish thug Mick in the film adaptation of Harold Pinter's The Caretaker (1963); starring alongside Anthony Quinn as the impressionable young writer Basil in Zorba the Greek (1964); the raffish charmer Jos who falls in love with Lynn Redgrave in the mod comedy Georgy Girl; the bemused young soldier who falls in love with a young mental patient (a radiantly young Genevieve Bujold) in the subdued anti-was satire King of Hearts (both 1966); reuniting with director Schlesinger again in the effective period drama Far from the Madding Crowd (1967); a Russian Jew falsely accused of murder in John Frankenheimer's The Fixer (1968, remarkably, his only Oscar nomination); as Rupert, the freethinking fellow who craves love and understanding in Ken Russell's superb Women in Love (1969); playing Vershinin in Sir Laurence Olivier's underrated The Three Sisters (1970); opposite Julie Christie in Joseph Losey's tale of forbidden love The Go-Between (1971); and his moving, near-tragic performance as Bri, a father who struggles daily to maintain his sanity while raising a mentally disabled daughter in the snarking black comedy A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (1972).

Bates would slow down his film work, concentrating on the stage for the next few years, including a Tony award winning turn on Broadway for his role in Butley (1972), but he reemerged strongly in the late '70s in three good films: a conniving womanizer in The Shout; Jill Clayburgh's love interest in Paul Mazursky's hit An Unmarried Woman (1978); and as Rudge, Bette Midler's overbearing manager in The Rose (1979).

By the '80s, Bates filled out somewhat physically, but his now burly presence looked just right in some quality roles: as the notorious spy, Guy Burgess, in John Schlesinger's acclaimed mini-series An Englishman Abroad (1983); a lonely homosexual who cares for his incarcerated lovers' dog in the charming comedy We think the World of You (1988); and a superb Claudius in Franco Zeffirelli's Hamlet (1990).

Tragically, Bates lost his son Tristan to an asthma attack in 1990; and lost his wife, actress Victoria Ward, in 1992. This led to too few film roles for the next several years, although he remained quite active on stage and television. However, just recently, Bates has had some choice moments on the silver screen, most notably as the butler Mr. Jennings in Robert Altman's murder mystery Gosford Park (2001); and scored a great comic coup as a gun-toting, flag-waving Hollywood has-been in a very broad satire about the Canadian movie industry Hollywood North (2003). Also, theatre fans had a treat when Bates appeared on Broadway last year to critical acclaim (and won a second Tony award) for his portrayal of an impoverished 19th century Russian nobleman in Fortune's Fool (2002). Most deservedly, he was knighted earlier this year for his fine contributions as an actor in all major mediums. Sir Alan Bates is survived by two brothers Martin and Jon, son Benedick and a granddaughter.

by Michael T. Toole
Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)

Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003)

Sir Alan Bates, the versatile British actor, who held a distinguished career on both stage and screen, via a string of outstanding roles in both classical (Shakespeare, Chekhov, Ibsen) and contemporary (Pinter, Osborne, Stoppard) drama, died of pancreatic cancer on December 27th in London. He was 69. Born Alan Arthur Bates on February 17th, 1934 in Derbyshire, England, Bates was the son of amateur musicians who wanted their son to become a concert pianist, but the young man had other ambitions, bluntly declaring to his parents that he had his sights set on an acting career when he was still in secondary school. He eventually earned a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, but had his career briefly interrupted with a two-year stint in the Royal Air Force. Soon after his discharge, Bates immediately joined the new English Stage Company at the Royal Court Theatre and by 1955 he had found steady stage work in London's West End theatre district. The following year, Bates made a notable mark in English theatre circles when he starred as Cliff Lewis in John Osborne's charging drama about a disaffected, working-class British youth in Look Back in Anger. Bates' enormous stage presence along with his brooding good looks and youthfulness (he was only 22 at the time of the play's run) made him a star and promised great things for his future. Four years later, Bates made a solid film debut in Tony Richardson's The Entertainer (1960) as the son of a failing seaside entertainer, played by Sir Laurence Olivier. Yet it would be his next two films that would leave an indelible impression in '60s British cinema; Bryan Forbes' Whistle Down the Wind (1961) and John Schlesinger's A Kind of Loving (1962). Bates' performances as a murderer on the lam who finds solace at a farm house in the company of children in the former, and a young working-class husband who struggles with his identity in a loveless marriage in the latter, were such finely nuanced portrayals of loners coping with an oppressive social order that he struck a chord with both audiences and critics alike. Soon, Bates was considered a key actor in the "angry young men" movement of the decade that included Albert Finney and Tom Courtney. For the next ten years, Bates simply moved from strength to strength as he chose film roles that both highlighted his range and raised his stock as an international celebrity: reprising his stage role as the brutish thug Mick in the film adaptation of Harold Pinter's The Caretaker (1963); starring alongside Anthony Quinn as the impressionable young writer Basil in Zorba the Greek (1964); the raffish charmer Jos who falls in love with Lynn Redgrave in the mod comedy Georgy Girl; the bemused young soldier who falls in love with a young mental patient (a radiantly young Genevieve Bujold) in the subdued anti-was satire King of Hearts (both 1966); reuniting with director Schlesinger again in the effective period drama Far from the Madding Crowd (1967); a Russian Jew falsely accused of murder in John Frankenheimer's The Fixer (1968, remarkably, his only Oscar nomination); as Rupert, the freethinking fellow who craves love and understanding in Ken Russell's superb Women in Love (1969); playing Vershinin in Sir Laurence Olivier's underrated The Three Sisters (1970); opposite Julie Christie in Joseph Losey's tale of forbidden love The Go-Between (1971); and his moving, near-tragic performance as Bri, a father who struggles daily to maintain his sanity while raising a mentally disabled daughter in the snarking black comedy A Day in the Death of Joe Egg (1972). Bates would slow down his film work, concentrating on the stage for the next few years, including a Tony award winning turn on Broadway for his role in Butley (1972), but he reemerged strongly in the late '70s in three good films: a conniving womanizer in The Shout; Jill Clayburgh's love interest in Paul Mazursky's hit An Unmarried Woman (1978); and as Rudge, Bette Midler's overbearing manager in The Rose (1979). By the '80s, Bates filled out somewhat physically, but his now burly presence looked just right in some quality roles: as the notorious spy, Guy Burgess, in John Schlesinger's acclaimed mini-series An Englishman Abroad (1983); a lonely homosexual who cares for his incarcerated lovers' dog in the charming comedy We think the World of You (1988); and a superb Claudius in Franco Zeffirelli's Hamlet (1990). Tragically, Bates lost his son Tristan to an asthma attack in 1990; and lost his wife, actress Victoria Ward, in 1992. This led to too few film roles for the next several years, although he remained quite active on stage and television. However, just recently, Bates has had some choice moments on the silver screen, most notably as the butler Mr. Jennings in Robert Altman's murder mystery Gosford Park (2001); and scored a great comic coup as a gun-toting, flag-waving Hollywood has-been in a very broad satire about the Canadian movie industry Hollywood North (2003). Also, theatre fans had a treat when Bates appeared on Broadway last year to critical acclaim (and won a second Tony award) for his portrayal of an impoverished 19th century Russian nobleman in Fortune's Fool (2002). Most deservedly, he was knighted earlier this year for his fine contributions as an actor in all major mediums. Sir Alan Bates is survived by two brothers Martin and Jon, son Benedick and a granddaughter. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the 2002 Golden Reel Award for Best Sound Editing for Music in a Feature Film by the Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE).

Released in United States Winter January 25, 2002

Film is based on John A Keel's non-fiction account of his investigation regarding UFO reports near Point Pleasant, West Virginia in the late 1960s, where people reportedly experienced inexplicable phenomena.

Completed shooting April 26, 2001.

Began shooting January 24, 2001.

aspect ratio 2.35:1

Released in United States Winter January 25, 2002