Revenant


1h 35m 1998

Brief Synopsis

Gang members attack fashionable European vampires living at Los Angeles' Chateau Marmont Hotel.

Film Details

Also Known As
Modern Vampires
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Synopsis

Gang members attack fashionable European vampires living at Los Angeles' Chateau Marmont Hotel.

Crew

Amy Agzarian

Accounting Assistant

Jason Andrew

Grip

David Anthony

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Tia Ardren

Assistant Director

Robert Backus

Boom Operator

Rick Baker

Special Makeup Effects

Lori Ball

Assistant Editor

Timothy Batts

Office Assistant

Larry Bock

Editor

Richard Boehm

Assistant Editor

Matthew Bright

Screenplay

Robin Brown

Director Of Photography

Dan Burton

Storyboard Artist

Carrie Campbell

Casting Associate

Dave Chameides

Steadicam Operator

Steven Chen

Office Assistant

Robyn Costa

Production Designer

Jean Costello

Production Coordinator

Sean Cottrel

Set Production Assistant

Don Daniel

Line Producer

Dawn Dreiling

Script Supervisor

Danny Elfman

Music

Gwen Field

Line Producer

Jordan Gertner

Co-Executive Producer

Charlotte Gimfolk

Set Decorator

Germaine Gray

Electrician

Fred Grossman

Production Accountant

Chris Hanley

Producer

H Michael Heuser

Executive Producer

Brent Jones

Stunt Coordinator

Charlie Kelly

Sound Mixer

Richard Kuhn

Key Grip

Sheri Lane

Photography

Francesca Lombardo

Craft Service

Francesco Lombardo

Props

Stacie B London

Art Director

Eduardo Lucero

Costume Designer

Starrs Mcburney

Assistant Camera Operator

Anne Mccarthy

Casting

James Navarro

Props Assistant

Ngoli Nylrenda

Best Boy

Shaun O'banion

Set Production Assistant

Wendy Palmer

Assistant Director

Kristen Payne

Set Production Assistant

Andrew Pearson

Assistant Production Coordinator

John Richardson

Assistant Director

Felix A. Rivera

Gaffer

Deandre Russell

Set Production Assistant

Freddie Saba

Electrician

Peter Schultz

Electrician

David Sirianni

Grip

Kenny Tong

Assistant Camera Operator

Lynn Van Kuilenburg

Location Manager

Mary Vernieu

Casting

Leah Wiederhorn

Office Assistant

Jay Wylie

Transportation Coordinator

Brad Wyman

Producer

Film Details

Also Known As
Modern Vampires
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1998
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger


ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Tcm Remembers - Rod Steiger

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Robert Pastorelli (1954-2004)


Robert Pastorelli, the rough and ready actor best known to television viewers for his portrayal of the devilish but lovable house painter Eldin on the long-running CBS comedy Murphy Brown (1988-97), was found dead on March 8 in his Hollywood Hills home. Authorities believe the cause of death was a drug overdose. He was 49.

Born on June 21, 1954 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Pastorelli had dreams of becoming a boxer, but when he was just 19, he was involved in a near fatal car accident that forced him to choose another career. By the late '70s, he chose acting. After doing some theater in New York, Pastorelli found work on both television: Barney Miller, Cagney & Lacey, Hill Street Blues; and film: Outrageous Fortune, Beverly Hills Cop II (both 1987), where his beefy frame and Runyonesque demeanor almost always had him play thugs and hoodlums.

In 1988, he found fame when he was cast opposite Candice Bergen as Eldin, the house painter who could never quite finish the job in Murphy Brown. Pastorelli's likable raffishness countered well with Bergen's icy charms, and he stayed on for six seasons.

After Murphy Brown, Pastorelli continued to play variations of the streetwise character, but this time to considerable comic effect in films like: Sister Act 2 (1994), Eraser, and Michael (both 1996). He returned to television impressively when he starred in the short-lived, but critically lauded Americanized version of the British Television hit Cracker. Pastorelli had just completed work on the Get Shorty (1995) sequel Be Cool with John Travolta, which is scheduled for release later this year. He is survived by a daughter.

by Michael T. Toole

Robert Pastorelli (1954-2004)

Robert Pastorelli, the rough and ready actor best known to television viewers for his portrayal of the devilish but lovable house painter Eldin on the long-running CBS comedy Murphy Brown (1988-97), was found dead on March 8 in his Hollywood Hills home. Authorities believe the cause of death was a drug overdose. He was 49. Born on June 21, 1954 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Pastorelli had dreams of becoming a boxer, but when he was just 19, he was involved in a near fatal car accident that forced him to choose another career. By the late '70s, he chose acting. After doing some theater in New York, Pastorelli found work on both television: Barney Miller, Cagney & Lacey, Hill Street Blues; and film: Outrageous Fortune, Beverly Hills Cop II (both 1987), where his beefy frame and Runyonesque demeanor almost always had him play thugs and hoodlums. In 1988, he found fame when he was cast opposite Candice Bergen as Eldin, the house painter who could never quite finish the job in Murphy Brown. Pastorelli's likable raffishness countered well with Bergen's icy charms, and he stayed on for six seasons. After Murphy Brown, Pastorelli continued to play variations of the streetwise character, but this time to considerable comic effect in films like: Sister Act 2 (1994), Eraser, and Michael (both 1996). He returned to television impressively when he starred in the short-lived, but critically lauded Americanized version of the British Television hit Cracker. Pastorelli had just completed work on the Get Shorty (1995) sequel Be Cool with John Travolta, which is scheduled for release later this year. He is survived by a daughter. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States July 9, 1999

Released in United States October 1998

Released in United States on Video October 19, 1999

Shown at Raindance Film Showcase in London October 22-31, 1998.

Straight-to-video release.

Began shooting June 21, 1997.

Completed shooting July 24, 1997.

Released in United States July 9, 1999 (San Francisco)

Released in United States October 1998 (Shown at Raindance Film Showcase in London October 22-31, 1998.)

Released in United States on Video October 19, 1999