The Time Machine


1h 36m 2002

Brief Synopsis

A man builds a time machine that allows him to travel 800,000 years into the future.

Film Details

Also Known As
La Machine a explorer le temps, Machine a explorer le temps, La, Time Machine
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Fantasy
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
2002
Production Company
20th Century Fox; Abbey Road Studios; Air Studios, London; Amblin Partners; American Humane Association; Avid Technology, Inc.; Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment, Inc.; Cinesite Europe, Ltd.; Core Digital Pictures; Digital Domain; Eastman Kodak; Illusion Arts, Inc.; Industrial Light + Magic; Ken & Art'S Catering; Knb Efx Group, Inc.; Media Ventures; New York City Mayor's Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting; New York Public Library; New York State Governor'S Office For Motion Picture & Tv Development; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Panavision, Ltd.; Paramount Pictures; Parkes+MacDonald Image Nation; Perry Dodgson; Stan Winston Studios; Technicolor; Turner Entertainment Company; Universal Studios Sound Facilities; Varese Sarabande; Warner Bros. Pictures; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Distribution Company
AMBLIN PARTNERS; 20th Century Fox International; Amblin Partners; Dreamworks Home Entertainment; Sam Film; Sandrew Metronome Distribution Finland Oy; Sandrew Metronome Distribution Sverige Ab (Sweden); Videocine; Warner Bros. Pictures International; Warner Sogefilms
Location
Schenectady, New York, USA; New York, USA; Warner Bros. Studios, Burbank, California, USA; Albany, New York, USA; Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York, USA; Troy, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Synopsis

Scientist and inventor Alexander Hartdegen is determined to prove that time travel is possible. His determination is turned to desperation by a personal tragedy that now drives him to want to change the past. Testing his theories with a time machine of his own invention, Hartdegen is hurtled 800,000 years into the future. There he finds a post-apocalyptic world where he discovers that mankind has been divided into the hunter... and the hunted.

Crew

Donovan A. Scott

Lead Digital Compositor (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Charles Abou Aad

Cg Effects Animator (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Jan H. Aaris

Special Effects (2nd Unit)

Gaku Ada

Cg Modeling & Lighting (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Rick Adami

Other

Delara C Adams

Assistant Production Ccordinator

Matthew Adams

Rotoscope Supervisor (Cinesite/Visual Effects & Animation)

Wes Adams

Driver

Mike Alkan

3-D Modeler

Mike Alkan

Animator (Core Digital Pictures/Digital Visual Effects)

Stephanie Allen

Executive Producer (Core Digital Pictures/Digital Visual Effects)

Tom Allen

Cg Effects Animator (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Richard Alonzo

Art Department (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Robert Alonzo

Stunts

Miles Anderson

Gaffer (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Paul H Anderson

Animator (Core Digital Pictures/Digital Visual Effects)

Ross A Anderson

Assistant Props (2nd Unit)

Susan Anderson

Creature Costumer (2nd Unit)

Tony Anderson

Miniature Director Of Photography (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Darryl Anka

Visual Effects Storyboard Artist (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Deena Appel

Costume Designer

Carlos A Araiza

Creature Costumer (2nd Unit)

Joel Aron

Lead Digital Artist (Industrial Light & Magic/Special Visual Effects & Animation)

James Ashwill

Foley Mixer

Maryellen Aviano-roberts

Extras Casting Coordinator

Keith Baber

Best Boy (2nd Unit)

Klaus Badelt

Music

Wayne Baker

"A" 1st Assistant Camera (2nd Unit)

Jeffrey Baksinski

Supervisor

Clayton Barber

Stunts

Alberto Barboza

Other

Lynn Basas

Cg Lighter (Cinesite/Visual Effects & Animation)

Geoffrey E Baumann

Other

Peter Baustaedter

Digital Matte Painter (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Chuck Beamis

Camera Assistant (Illusion Arts/Special Visual Effects)

Bill Beasley

1st Assistant Director (2nd Unit)

Lisa Bechard

Production Manager (Core Digital Pictures/Digital Visual Effects)

Brian Begun

Lead Digital Compositor (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Jennifer K Bell

"A" 2nd Assistant Camera (2nd Unit)

Jon G Belyeu

Special Effects (2nd Unit)

David Beneke

Art Department (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Krista Benson

Digital Compositor (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Jill Berger

Cg Lighter (Cinesite/Visual Effects & Animation)

Nancy Bernstein

Visual Effects Executive Producer (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Tom Bertino

Animation Supervisor (Industrial Light & Magic/Special Visual Effects & Animation)

Johnny Beyers

Electrician

Mark Binder

Special Sound Effects

Duncan Blackman

3-D Matchmove Artist (Industrial Light & Magic/Special Visual Effects & Animation)

Steve Blalock

Stunts

Deborah 'cha' Blevins

Costume Supervisor

Melanie Boettcher

Other

Louella Boquiren

Stunts

Kevin Bouchez

Digital Compositor (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Brigitte Bourque

Digital Compositor (Cinesite/Visual Effects & Animation)

Mike Boyle

Head Animal Handler

Patrick G Brady

Mold/Technical Department (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Justin Brandstater

Matte Artist (Illusion Arts/Special Visual Effects)

Stephen C Brandt

Set Production Assistant (New York)

Randy Bricker

First Assistant Editor

Christopher S Brooks

Supervising Music Editor

Michael Broomberg

Foley Artist

Bob F Brown

Stunt Coordinator (2nd Unit)

Charles Brown

Steadicam Operator

Charles Brown

Dolly Grip

Suzy Brown

Digital Matte Painter (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Dartenea Bryant

Stunts

Stephen Burg

Illustrator

Greg Burgan

Mold/Technical Department (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Sonja Burhcard

Digital Compositor (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Christopher Burian-mohr

Art Director

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutter

Amanda Burton

Digital Rotoscope

Amanda Burton

Other

Ronnie Bushaw

Digital Matte Painter (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Jeff Butcher

Property Master (New York)

Norman Cabrera

Sculptor (Knb Efx Group/Special Uber Morlock Make-Up)

Ed Callahan

Dialog Editor

Jodi Campanaro

Lead Digital Compositor (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Marco Campos

Construction/General Foreman

Rick Canelli

Adr Recordist

Tamara Carlson-woodard

Fabrication Department (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Roberto M Carneiro

Costumer (2nd Unit)

Damon Caro

Stunts

Glenn M. Carrere

Set Dresser

Mike Castillo

Digital Compositor (Cinesite/Visual Effects & Animation)

Oscar G Castillo

Cg Effects Animator (Cinesite/Visual Effects & Animation)

John F Castro

Researcher

Rick Cedillo

Fabrication Department (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Lanny Cermak

Lead 3-D Matchmvoe Artist (Industrial Light & Magic/Special Visual Effects & Animation)

Karen K Chang

Office Coordinator

Nikia Charles

Stunts

Jim Charmatz

Key Artist (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

John Cherevka

Puppeteer

John Cherevka

Art Department (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Michael Chock

Sound Effects Editor

Pamela Choules

Production Coordinator (Illusion Arts/Special Visual Effects)

Lynda Cipperley

Driver

Kevin Clark

Visual Effects Editor (Cinesite/Visual Effects & Animation)

Richard A Clark

Assistant Location Manager

Tim Clark

Production Assistant

Tom Clary

Digital Effects 2-D Coordinator (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Robert Clotworthy

Adr Voice Casting

Michael Coady

Driver

Dan Cobbett

Digital Compositor (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Martin Cohen

Post-Production Executive

Grazia Como

Technical Assistant (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Eric P Cook

Special Effects

James Cook

Miniature Model Maker (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Cora Lee Coomber

Construction Accountant

Andrew Cooper

Still Photographer

Matt Cordner

Cgi Artist

Angelo Corello

Driver

John Michael Courte

Other

Marcy Craig

Key Costumer

Kelly G Crawford

Visual Effects Editor (Illusion Arts/Special Visual Effects)

Robert C Crockett

Best Boy Grip (2nd Unit)

Lee Croft

Digital Paint & Roto (Industrial Light & Magic/Special Visual Effects & Animation)

John Cucci

Foley Artist

Ken Culver

Key Foam Technician (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Brad Curry

Other

Michael D'imperio

Assistant Property Master

Laura Dash

Stunts

Tonia Davall

Music Contractor

Jon Dawe

Mechanical Department (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Jon Dawe

Puppeteer

Chris Dawson

Motion Control Operator (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Bruce De Aragon

"B" 2nd Assistant Camera (2nd Unit)

Carlos De La Torre

Production Assistant

Nancy Deamicis

Driver

Bruce Dearagon

Assistant Camera Operator

Aladino V Debert

Cg Modeling & Lighting (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

William Decker

Rigging Key Grip

Stephen P Del Prete

Production Assistant

Mark Della Rosa

3-D Modeler (Core Digital Pictures/Digital Visual Effects)

Eileen Dennis

2nd Assistant Accountant

Chris Dent

Art Department Production Assistant

Kevin Derr

Stunts

Rob Derry

Mechanical Department (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Patsy Deshields

Production Accountant

Vashti Desire

Driver

Maria Devane

Post-Production Accountant

Sean Devereaux

Digital Compositor (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Kelsee Devoreaux

Stunts

Gary C Diamond

Set Designer

David Diano

Camera Operator

Alex Diaz

Other

Alex Diaz

Other

Dawn Dininger

Fabrication Department (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Ramin Djawadi

Other

Perry Dodgson

Cableman

Shirley Dolle

Hair Stylist (2nd Unit)

James Dooley

Other

Jason Doss

3-D Integration Artist (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Brady Doyle

Visual Effects Production Assistant (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Loring Doyle

Other

Loring Doyle

Digital Rotoscope

Joe Dubs

Digital Artist (Cinesite/Visual Effects & Animation)

Michael Duenas

Special Effects

David Duncan

From Screenplay

Michael Dunivant

Rigging Best Boy Grip

Rachel Dunn

Digital Compositor (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Jeff Durling

Other

Syd Dutton

Special Visual Effects (Illusion Arts/Special Visual Effects)

Timothy Eaton

Visual Effects Editor (Industrial Light & Magic/Special Visual Effects & Animation)

Jared Eddo

Stunts

Scott Eddo

Makeup Artist

Scott Edelstein

3-D Integraion Artist (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Sam Edwards

Digital Compositor (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Jonathan Egstad

Digital Effects Supevisor (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Kevin Elam

Visual Effects Producer (Cinesite/Visual Effects & Animation)

John M. Elliott Jr.

Key Makeup

Margeret E Elliott

Makeup Artist (2nd Unit)

Stephen A Elsbree

Key Hairstylist (2nd Unit)

Richard Epper

Stunts

Jeff Ertl

Digital Artist (Industrial Light & Magic/Special Visual Effects & Animation)

Orlando Estrada

Stunts

Deborah C Evans

Payroll Accountant (New York)

Sean Andrew Faden

Cg Time Travel Sequence Lead (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Matthew Fairclough

Other

Roy Farfel

Stunts

Alan Faucher

Supervisor

Jon Fedele

Mold/Technical Department (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Michael Fenster

Driver

Aaron Ferguson

Other

Brigitte R. Ferry

Set Costumer

Robert Fetchman

Assistant Art Director

Sean P. Fickert

Grip

Eric Fiedler

Puppeteer

Eric Fiedler

Mechanical Department Coordinator (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Greg Figiel

Puppeteer

Greg Figiel

Charecter Effects Supervisor (Stan Winston Studio/Morlock Make-Up Effects Designer & Creator)

Claire Flewin

Costumer

Ivy Fong

Cg & Editorial Technician (Industrial Light & Magic/Special Visual Effects & Animation)

Glenn Forbes

Property Master (2nd Unit)

Dan Fowler

Character Animator (Digital Domain/Special Visual Effects & Digital Animation)

Lucinda Foy

Special Effects

Holly C Frabizio

Locations Assistant (New York)

Carl Frederick

Supervisor

Todd Fulford

Digital Artist (Industrial Light & Magic/Special Visual Effects & Animation)

David Gainey

Animator (Industrial Light & Magic/Special Visual Effects & Animation)

Film Details

Also Known As
La Machine a explorer le temps, Machine a explorer le temps, La, Time Machine
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Fantasy
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
2002
Production Company
20th Century Fox; Abbey Road Studios; Air Studios, London; Amblin Partners; American Humane Association; Avid Technology, Inc.; Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment, Inc.; Cinesite Europe, Ltd.; Core Digital Pictures; Digital Domain; Eastman Kodak; Illusion Arts, Inc.; Industrial Light + Magic; Ken & Art'S Catering; Knb Efx Group, Inc.; Media Ventures; New York City Mayor's Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting; New York Public Library; New York State Governor'S Office For Motion Picture & Tv Development; Pacific Title & Art Studio; Panavision, Ltd.; Paramount Pictures; Parkes+MacDonald Image Nation; Perry Dodgson; Stan Winston Studios; Technicolor; Turner Entertainment Company; Universal Studios Sound Facilities; Varese Sarabande; Warner Bros. Pictures; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Distribution Company
AMBLIN PARTNERS; 20th Century Fox International; Amblin Partners; Dreamworks Home Entertainment; Sam Film; Sandrew Metronome Distribution Finland Oy; Sandrew Metronome Distribution Sverige Ab (Sweden); Videocine; Warner Bros. Pictures International; Warner Sogefilms
Location
Schenectady, New York, USA; New York, USA; Warner Bros. Studios, Burbank, California, USA; Albany, New York, USA; Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York, USA; Troy, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m

Award Nominations

Best Makeup

2002

Articles

Remake - The Time Machine


BACK TO THE FUTURE AGAIN

It was inevitable that some enterprising Hollywood producer would remake The Time Machine as a big budget, state-of-the-art extravaganza with a heavy emphasis on special effects. While the 1960 film version directed by George Pal wasn't exactly a landmark in science fiction cinema, it was atmospheric, visually impressive and occasionally even thought-provoking. The special effects, though rather modest by today's standards, won an Oscar, Rod Taylor made a charismatic hero and Yvette Mimieux was memorable as Weena, the blonde Eloi maiden from the year 802,710. Best of all was the handsomely designed time machine which looked like some unclassifiable piece of Victorian furniture with flashing lights and fancy knobs. Although the film was also fairly faithful to the H.G. Wells novel on which it was based, it definitely reduced a great deal of Wells' political and sociological observations in the book to a few passing comments in the dialogue, but it least it had that! The new version of The Time Machine dispenses with most of the intellectual concerns of the Welles novel in favor of action, emphasizing the time travel aspects and a romance between Alexander Hartdegen (Guy Pearce), the time traveler, and Mara (Irish singer Samantha Mumba) of the Eloi tribe. Screenwriter John Logan confirmed the fantasy adventure approach in Dreamworks' new version in a New York Times article: "In making an entertaining movie, the political ideas fall to the side and probably rightfully so, because in the movies it wouldn't be a good mix." But the film DOES have two interesting connections to the past: Simon Wells, the great grandson of H.G. Wells, directs the new version, and Allan Young, who appeared in the 1960 version of The Time Machine, also makes a cameo appearance in this one.

The selection of Guy Pearce for the leading man is an interesting choice. In an interview on the official site for The Time Machine, director Wells said, "Try to find a lead actor who can be the kind of action star but also carries enough of the sense of being an intellectual, a man of thought. It is surprisingly difficult when you go down the list and start thinking, 'Well, I buy him as an action star but is he a professor?' The list gets quite short."

The critics don't appear to care for Pearce as the time traveler or this new version of The Time Machine based on incoming reviews but audiences seem hungry for a retelling of Welles' story. Just look at the opening weekend grosses - it was in the top position. At any rate, here are a few sample comments from critics around the country:

Mick LaSalle of The San Francisco Chronicle said: "This new version of the H.G. Wells classic, before it loses its way, takes that longing and pumps it up beyond anything Wells had in mind....Pearce, a chameleon among actors, is obviously giving us a certain kind of guy, but here's the weird part: At times it looks as if he's giving us a specific guy, that he's actually imitating someone -- namely, the mayor of Oakland. That an Australian actor would model a character after Mayor Jerry Brown might sound far-fetched, except that Pearce even seems to have adopted a slightly husky voice for the first time in his career. This is either a homage or an uncanny accident. The picture is compelling in its first half-hour....But soon the movie switches gears. It stops being about a search for the past, loses its emotional hook and finds nothing nearly as compelling to replace it."

Kenneth Turan of The Los Angeles Times wrote: "Based on the celebrated 1895 H.G. Wells novella, "Time Machine" was previously filmed by George Pal in 1960 in a much-loved Rod Taylor-Yvette Mimieux version that the new one makes several references to. This "Time Machine" has an even stronger connection to the past: Its director, Simon Wells, is H.G.'s great-grandson. But, as both Pal and the current team discovered, theoriginal book, as much a class-conscious sociopolitical tract as a science-fiction novel, was rather thin on plot, to the point of calling its protagonist nothing more than "the Time Traveler." This new version (written by John Logan and "based on the [1960] screenplay by David Duncan" - a rarely seen credit) has understandably worked hard to remedy that situation. Perhaps too hard. So much effort has been put into creating a believable world for the traveler to come from and a creditable back story for his trip that what happens 800,000 years in the future seems to belong to a completely different - and less interesting- picture.....What he finds is anything but pleasant, and, armed with this knowledge, the film changes tone completely. Humanity has apparently split into two different races, the tree-hugging Eloi, epitomized by the fetching Mara (Irish recording artist Samantha Mumba), and the nasty and brutish Morlocks, led by the snarling Uber-Morlock (Jeremy Irons made up like a demented version of rock star Edgar Winter).The centerpiece of this section is a busy action sequence of partially animatronic Morlocks running around and terrorizing the Eloi. It's acceptably done, but the violent, unpleasant tone is so at variance with the rest of the film that it's more disconcerting than anything else, as if "The Little Princess" had suddenly morphed into "Rollerball."

Roger Ebert of The Chicago Sun-Times proclaimed The Time Machine "a witless recycling of the H.G. Wells story from 1895, with the absurdity intact but the wonderment missing. It makes use of computer-aided graphics to create a future race of grubby underground beasties, who like the characters in "Battleship Earth" have evolved beyond the need for bathing and fingernail clippers. Since this race--the Morlocks--is allegedly a Darwinian offshoot of humans, and since they are remarkably unattractive, they call into question the theory that over a long period of time a race grows more attractive through natural selection. They are obviously the result of 800,000 years of ugly brides.....In broad outline, this future world matches the one depicted in George Pal's 1960 film "The Time Machine," although its blond, blue-eyed race of Eloi have been transformed into dusky sun people. One nevertheless tends to question romances between people who were born 800,000 years apart and have few conversations on subjects other than not being eaten. Convenient, that when humankind was splitting into two different races, both its branches continued to speak English."

Regardless of how this new version of The Time Machine fares, filmmakers will probably return to the H.G. Wells novel again for inspiration in future years. His book certainly has provided Hollywood with plenty of previous time travel flicks that clicked with moviegoers - Time After Time (1979) starring Malcolm McDowell as H.G. Wells and David Warner as Jack the Ripper in 20th century San Francisco, and Back to the Future (1985) and its two sequels with Michael J. Fox. For more information about The Time Machine, visit the Official Web Site.

By Jeff Stafford

Remake - The Time Machine

Remake - The Time Machine

BACK TO THE FUTURE AGAIN It was inevitable that some enterprising Hollywood producer would remake The Time Machine as a big budget, state-of-the-art extravaganza with a heavy emphasis on special effects. While the 1960 film version directed by George Pal wasn't exactly a landmark in science fiction cinema, it was atmospheric, visually impressive and occasionally even thought-provoking. The special effects, though rather modest by today's standards, won an Oscar, Rod Taylor made a charismatic hero and Yvette Mimieux was memorable as Weena, the blonde Eloi maiden from the year 802,710. Best of all was the handsomely designed time machine which looked like some unclassifiable piece of Victorian furniture with flashing lights and fancy knobs. Although the film was also fairly faithful to the H.G. Wells novel on which it was based, it definitely reduced a great deal of Wells' political and sociological observations in the book to a few passing comments in the dialogue, but it least it had that! The new version of The Time Machine dispenses with most of the intellectual concerns of the Welles novel in favor of action, emphasizing the time travel aspects and a romance between Alexander Hartdegen (Guy Pearce), the time traveler, and Mara (Irish singer Samantha Mumba) of the Eloi tribe. Screenwriter John Logan confirmed the fantasy adventure approach in Dreamworks' new version in a New York Times article: "In making an entertaining movie, the political ideas fall to the side and probably rightfully so, because in the movies it wouldn't be a good mix." But the film DOES have two interesting connections to the past: Simon Wells, the great grandson of H.G. Wells, directs the new version, and Allan Young, who appeared in the 1960 version of The Time Machine, also makes a cameo appearance in this one. The selection of Guy Pearce for the leading man is an interesting choice. In an interview on the official site for The Time Machine, director Wells said, "Try to find a lead actor who can be the kind of action star but also carries enough of the sense of being an intellectual, a man of thought. It is surprisingly difficult when you go down the list and start thinking, 'Well, I buy him as an action star but is he a professor?' The list gets quite short." The critics don't appear to care for Pearce as the time traveler or this new version of The Time Machine based on incoming reviews but audiences seem hungry for a retelling of Welles' story. Just look at the opening weekend grosses - it was in the top position. At any rate, here are a few sample comments from critics around the country: Mick LaSalle of The San Francisco Chronicle said: "This new version of the H.G. Wells classic, before it loses its way, takes that longing and pumps it up beyond anything Wells had in mind....Pearce, a chameleon among actors, is obviously giving us a certain kind of guy, but here's the weird part: At times it looks as if he's giving us a specific guy, that he's actually imitating someone -- namely, the mayor of Oakland. That an Australian actor would model a character after Mayor Jerry Brown might sound far-fetched, except that Pearce even seems to have adopted a slightly husky voice for the first time in his career. This is either a homage or an uncanny accident. The picture is compelling in its first half-hour....But soon the movie switches gears. It stops being about a search for the past, loses its emotional hook and finds nothing nearly as compelling to replace it." Kenneth Turan of The Los Angeles Times wrote: "Based on the celebrated 1895 H.G. Wells novella, "Time Machine" was previously filmed by George Pal in 1960 in a much-loved Rod Taylor-Yvette Mimieux version that the new one makes several references to. This "Time Machine" has an even stronger connection to the past: Its director, Simon Wells, is H.G.'s great-grandson. But, as both Pal and the current team discovered, theoriginal book, as much a class-conscious sociopolitical tract as a science-fiction novel, was rather thin on plot, to the point of calling its protagonist nothing more than "the Time Traveler." This new version (written by John Logan and "based on the [1960] screenplay by David Duncan" - a rarely seen credit) has understandably worked hard to remedy that situation. Perhaps too hard. So much effort has been put into creating a believable world for the traveler to come from and a creditable back story for his trip that what happens 800,000 years in the future seems to belong to a completely different - and less interesting- picture.....What he finds is anything but pleasant, and, armed with this knowledge, the film changes tone completely. Humanity has apparently split into two different races, the tree-hugging Eloi, epitomized by the fetching Mara (Irish recording artist Samantha Mumba), and the nasty and brutish Morlocks, led by the snarling Uber-Morlock (Jeremy Irons made up like a demented version of rock star Edgar Winter).The centerpiece of this section is a busy action sequence of partially animatronic Morlocks running around and terrorizing the Eloi. It's acceptably done, but the violent, unpleasant tone is so at variance with the rest of the film that it's more disconcerting than anything else, as if "The Little Princess" had suddenly morphed into "Rollerball." Roger Ebert of The Chicago Sun-Times proclaimed The Time Machine "a witless recycling of the H.G. Wells story from 1895, with the absurdity intact but the wonderment missing. It makes use of computer-aided graphics to create a future race of grubby underground beasties, who like the characters in "Battleship Earth" have evolved beyond the need for bathing and fingernail clippers. Since this race--the Morlocks--is allegedly a Darwinian offshoot of humans, and since they are remarkably unattractive, they call into question the theory that over a long period of time a race grows more attractive through natural selection. They are obviously the result of 800,000 years of ugly brides.....In broad outline, this future world matches the one depicted in George Pal's 1960 film "The Time Machine," although its blond, blue-eyed race of Eloi have been transformed into dusky sun people. One nevertheless tends to question romances between people who were born 800,000 years apart and have few conversations on subjects other than not being eaten. Convenient, that when humankind was splitting into two different races, both its branches continued to speak English." Regardless of how this new version of The Time Machine fares, filmmakers will probably return to the H.G. Wells novel again for inspiration in future years. His book certainly has provided Hollywood with plenty of previous time travel flicks that clicked with moviegoers - Time After Time (1979) starring Malcolm McDowell as H.G. Wells and David Warner as Jack the Ripper in 20th century San Francisco, and Back to the Future (1985) and its two sequels with Michael J. Fox. For more information about The Time Machine, visit the Official Web Site. By Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring March 8, 2002

Released in United States on Video July 23, 2002

Feature live action directorial debut for director Simon Wells, co-director of the animated hit "The Prince of Egypt" (USA/1998). Simon Wells is the great-grandson of H.G. Wells, author of the sci-fi classic, "The Time Machine."

Began shooting February 5, 2001.

Gore Verbinski directed the last 18 days of principal photography, when Simon Wells dropped out due to extreme exhaustion. Simon Wells returned for post-production.

Completed shooting June 20, 2001.

Released in United States Spring March 8, 2002

Released in United States on Video July 23, 2002