Dead Bang


1h 49m 1989

Brief Synopsis

Based on the true stories of detective Jerry Beck, a policeman trails a murderer from Hollywood to Colorado....

Film Details

Also Known As
Dead-Bang
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures International (WBI)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Drumheller, Alberta, Canada; Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Banff, Alberta, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m

Synopsis

An obsessed detective will do what it takes to bring down a gang of white supremacists in director John Frankenheimer's explosive crime thriller "Dead Bang" (1989). When a cop is viciously slain on Christmas Eve, the homicide detective assigned the case follows leads right to the door of a gang of nasty racists who are armed to the teeth and blinded by hatred. Starring Don Johnson, William Forsythe and Penelope Ann Miller.

Crew

Ken Adam

Production Designer

Stuart Aikins

Casting

Eric D Andersen

Camera Operator

Jerome Beck

Consultant

Bill W Benton

Sound

Janice Blackie-goodine

On-Set Dresser

Xochi Blymyer

Production Assistant

Robyn Britton

Production Coordinator

Jamie Brown

Special Effects

Jamie Brown

Makeup Supervisor

Stephen S. Campanelli

Steadicam Operator

Bette Chadwick

Casting

Steve Chambers

Stunts

Gary Chang

Music

Julian Chojnacki

Steadicam Operator

Ted Churchill

Steadicam Operator

David Crone

Steadicam Operator

Jeff Dashnaw

Stunts

Ron Dietel

Researcher

Julia Done

Production Assistant

Lee Dragu

Sound Effects Editor

Denis Dutton

Foley Editor

James R. Dyer

Assistant Director

Carl Ebner

Other

Joe Evans

Stunts

Gwendolyn Files

Production Associate

Gerry Fisher

Director Of Photography

Robert Foster

Screenplay

Robert Foster

Co-Executive Producer

David Geddes

Camera Operator

Grace Gilroy

Unit Production Manager

Tom Glass

Stunts

Alex Green

Stunts

James Halty

Stunts

Jay M Harding

Sound

Claude Havanavicus

Sound Mixer

Frances Hays

Costumes

Freddie Hice

Stunts

Buddy Joe Hooker

Stunts

Steve Housewright

Production Assistant

Richard Hudolin

Art Director

Thomas J Huff

Stunts

John Inzerella

Makeup

Gregory Jacobs

Dialogue Editor

David Jacox

Stunts

John L Jensen

Production

Michael Kamen

Music

Brian Kent

Other

Tedd Kuchera

On-Set Dresser

Mike Le Mare

Sound Editor

Alan Manzer

Art Director

Burke Mattsson

Titles

Peter Mclennon

Camera Operator

John C. Meier

Stunts

Bridget Murphy

Production Coordinator

Fred Murphy

Steadicam Operator

Murray Ord

Location Manager

Anthony Palk

Sound Editor

Art Parker

Set Decorator

Ron Quigley

Location Manager

Laurie Reese

Production Assistant

Mic Rodgers

Stunts

Mic Rodgers

Stunt Coordinator

Dan Roger

Stunts

Diane Rogers

Casting

Robert L. Rosen

Executive Producer

Steve Roth

Producer

Jacob Rupp

Stunts

Don Sanders

Music Editor

John Scott

Stunts

Robert F. Shugrue

Editor

James Skotchdopole

Assistant Director

Lincoln Stalmaster

Production Assistant

Lynn Stalmaster

Casting Director

Vladimir Stefoff

Assistant Director

Ron Stein

Stunts

John J Stephens

Sound

Ray Summers

Costume Supervisor

Keith Tellez

Stunts

Jodie Tillen

Costume Designer

Clifford P Wenger

Special Effects

Cheryl M Wheeler

Stunts

Charles Wilborn

Sound Mixer

Brent Woolsey

Stunt Coordinator

Brent Woolsey

Stunts

Film Details

Also Known As
Dead-Bang
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures International (WBI)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Drumheller, Alberta, Canada; Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Banff, Alberta, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m

Articles

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003


Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive.

Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979).

Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's (1991) delivering a moving performance as a homeless cabaret singer with AIDS.

He scored his biggest coup when he was cast the same year in the hit sitcom Evening Shade (1991-1994) as Herman Stiles, the wimpy assistant to Reynolds, who played a pro football player turned coach. He won an Emmy award in 1992 for that role and scored two more nominations by the end of the series run. Jeter would also get some good supporting parts in many films throughout the decade: Sister Act 2 (1993), a fun comic role as Whoopi Goldberg's sidekick Father Ignatius; Mouse Hunt (1997); The Green Mile (1999), his best film role as Eduard Delacroix, a condemned murderer who befriends a cellblock mouse; Jurassic Park III (2001); and Welcome to Collinwood (2002).

At the time of his death, Jeter was appearing on the classic PBS children's series Sesame Street as the lovable but bumbling Mr. Noodle; and had been filming Robert Zemekis' Christmas movie The Polar Express starring Tom Hanks. Production was halted on Monday in observance of Jeter's death. He is survived by his life partner, Sean Blue, his parents, Dr. William and Virginia Jeter; a brother, William; and four sisters, Virginia Anne Barham, Emily Jeter, Amanda Parsons and Laurie Wicker.

by Michael T. Toole
Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive. Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979). Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video October 18, 1989

Released in United States Spring March 24, 1989

Director John Frankenheimer died July 6, 2002 of a stroke at the age of 72.

Began shooting April 14, 1988.

Completed shooting July 1988.

Released in United States Spring March 24, 1989

Released in United States on Video October 18, 1989