Minority Report


2h 20m 2002
Minority Report

Brief Synopsis

An enforcer who catches people before they can commit crimes is framed for murder.

Film Details

Also Known As
Sentencia previa
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Thriller
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
2002
Distribution Company
20TH CENTURY FOX DISTRIBUTION/AMBLIN PARTNERS
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Washington, DC, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 20m

Synopsis

In Washington, D.C., in the year 2054, murder has been eliminated. The future is seen and the guilty punished before the crime has ever been committed. From a nexus deep within the Justice Department's elite Pre-Crime unit, all the evidence to convict--from imagery alluding to the time, place and other details--is seen by "Pre-Cogs," three psychic beings whose visions of murders have never been wrong. It is the nation's most advanced crime force, a perfect system. And no one works harder for Pre-Crime than its top man, Chief John Anderton. Destroyed by a tragic loss, Anderton has thrown all of his passion into a system that could potentially spare thousands of people from the tragedy he lived through. Six years later, the coming vote to take it national has only fueled his conviction that Pre-Crime works. Anderton has no reason to doubt it... until he becomes its #1 suspect. As the head of the unit, Anderton is the first to see the images as they flow from the liquid suspension chamber where the Pre-Cogs dream of murder. The scene is unfamiliar, the faces unknown to him, but this time, the killer's identity is clear--John Anderton will murder a total stranger in less than 36 hours. Now with his own unit tracking his every move, led by his rival Danny Witwer, Anderton must go below the radar of the state-of-the-art automated city, where every step you take is monitored. Because you can't hide, everybody runs. With no way to defend himself against the charge of Pre-Crime, John must trace the roots of what brought him here, and uncover the truth behind the questions he has spent the past six years working to eliminate: Is it possible for the Pre-Cogs to be wrong?

Cast

Tom Cruise

Colin Farrell

Max Von Sydow

Jessica Capshaw

Victoria Kelleher

Raquel Gordon

Vene Arcoraci

Kirk B. R. Woller

Kathryn Morris

Scott Frank

Arye Gross

Erica Ford

Adrianna Kamosa

Peter Stormare

Nicholas E Barb

Fiona Hale

George Wallace

Kari Gordon

Pamela Roberts

Gene Wheeler

Samantha Morton

Anna Maria Horsford

David Doty

Andrew Sandler

Elizabeth Kamosa

Jason Antoon

Tyler Patrick Jones

Daniel London

Catfish Bates

Ethan Sherman

Bonnie Morgan

Ron Ulstad

Kathi Copeland

Jorge-luis Pallo

Joel Gretsch

William Mesnik

Vanessa Cedotal

Tom Whitenight

Jessica Harper

Kimiko Gelman

Payman Kayvanfar

Tim Blake Nelson

Matthew Dickman

Meredith Monroe

David Stifel

James D Henderson

Steve Harris

John Bennett

Shannon O'hurley

Brennen Means

Lois Smith

Rebecca Ritz

Sarah Simmons

David Hornsby

Clement E Blake

Nancy Linehan Charles

Radmar Agana Jao

Patrick Kilpatrick

Caitlin Mao

Benita Krista Nall

Eugene Osment

Gina Gallego

Jerry Perchesky

Victor Raider-wexler

Kurt Sinclair

Bertell Lawrence

Tonya Ivey

Maureen Dunn

Allie Raye

Nathan Taylor

Ana Maria Quintana

Morgan Hasson

Katy Boyer

Ann Ryerson

William Mapother

Ashley Crow

Lucille M Oliver

Paul Wesley

Anne Judson Yager

Nadia Axakowsky

Tom Choi

Karina Logue

Dude Walker

Rocael Rueda Jr.

Drakeel Burns

Mike Binder

Beverly Morgan

Laurel Kamosa

Tony Hill

Stephen Ramsey

Elizabeth Anne Smith

Danny Lopez

Caroline Lagerfelt

Klea Scott

Neal Mcdonough

Miles Dinsmoor

Frank Grillo

Keith Campbell

Dominic Scott Kay

Keith Flippen

Severin Wunderman

Spencer Treat Clark

Blake Bashoff

Michael Dickman

Elizabeth Penn Payne

Richard Coca

William Morts

Jim Rash

Crew

Kevin Abercrombie

Stunts

Joshua Hunter Adams

Video Assist/Playback

Blondel Aidoo

Visual Effects Producer

Sande Alessi

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Jon Alexander

Digital Effects Artist

Robert Alidon

Special Effects Technician

David Allen

Special Effects

Richard W Allen

Foreman

Jorge Almeida

Character Designer

Gregory Alpert

Location Manager

Matthew Altman

On-Set Dresser

Anthony Alvarez

Stunts

Deborah Ambrosino

Costumes

Robert Amerian

Electrician

Greg Anderson

Stunts

Danny Andres

Grip

Chris Antonucci

Stunts

Ethan Applen

Assistant

Fred Arbegast

Sculptor

Barry Armour

Cg Supervisor

Charlie Armstrong

Location Manager

Amy Arnold

Costumer

Lori Arnold

Visual Effects

Lisa Aron

Software Engineer

Al Arthur

Special Effects Technician

Michael S Arvanitis

Best Boy

Karen Asano-myers

Hair Stylist

John Ashker

Stunts

Fahima Atrouni

Tailor

John Yehia Atrouni

Tailor

John August

Other

Ramsey Avery

Art Director

Douglas Axtell

Sound Mixer

Lance Baetkey

Digital Effects Artist

Jeanie Baker

Costumer

Kirk Balden

Digital Effects Artist

Terry Baliel

Hair Stylist

Mark Ballentine

Best Boy

Ron Baratie

Greensman

Parker Barlett

Video Playback

Christopher Barron

Sound

James M Barron

Carpenter

Rod Basham

Digital Effects Artist

Robert Bastens

Stunts

Travis Baumann

Digital Effects Artist

Jamie Baxter

Matte Painter

Chris Bayz

Digital Effects Artist

Randall K Bean

Film Lab

David Beasley

Special Effects Technician

Cheryl Beasley-blackwell

Key Costumer

Bruce Bebee Jr.

Lighting Technician

Betty Beebe

Makeup Artist

Ramiro Belgardt

Music Editor

Harald Belker

Art Department

Elissa Bello

2-D Artist

Lydia Benain

Hair Stylist

Tina Bennett

Assistant Production Coordinator

Todd Bennett

Plasterer

Dena Berdge

Effects Assistant

Eric Berger

Visual Effects

Dena Berman

Casting Assistant

Jerry Bertolami

Dolly Grip

Brooke Biagi

Coordinator

Judith H Bickerton

Hair Stylist

Andrea Biklian

Negative Cutting

John Black

Assistant

Richard L Blackwell

Stunts

Larry Blanford

Director Of Photography

Larry Blanford

Aerial Director Of Photography

Patricia Blau

Visual Effects

Nancy Blewer

Assistant Director

David Blizard

Animation Supervisor

Mev Blount

Dga Trainee

Bobbie Blyle

Assistant

Kathleen Bobak

Assistant Director

Stella Bogh

Digital Effects Artist

Marek Bojsza

Electrician

Cosmas Paul Bolger Jr.

Film Lab

Jeff Boortz

Visual Effects

Chris Bothwell

Electrician

Ronald Bouma

Models

Lorraine Boushell

Makeup Artist

Phil Bowen

Assistant Camera

Christopher Bowling

Assistant

Peter Bowmar

Animator

Christopher Boyes

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Max Bozeman

On-Set Dresser

Lance Brackett

Special Effects Technician

Jim Bradfield

Rigging Electrician

Steve Braggs

Animation Supervisor

Jake Brake

Stunts

Sherri Bramlett

Hair Stylist

John Branagan

Stunts

Marc Braun

Props

Barbara Brennan

Digital Effects Artist

Phil Brennan

Digital Effects Artist

Marc Brickman

Consultant

Monica Brinn

Assistant

Clare Britell

Costumes

Nancy Broadfoot

Makeup Artist

Bela Brojek

Cgi Artist

Kayce Brown

Assistant

Linda Kay Brown

Foley Editor

Mark W Brown

Props Assistant

Thomas H. Brown

Special Effects Technician

Eric Bruneau

Cg Supervisor

Michael Brunsfeld

Concept Artist

Greg Bryant

Special Effects Technician

Christopher S Bryson

Assistant

Richard Bucher

Stunts

Kat Bueno

Grip

Tim Burby

Sound

Ted Burge

Software Engineer

Michele Burke

Makeup Designer

Michele Burke

Makeup Supervisor

Bobby Burns

Stunts

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Nelson Bush

On-Set Dresser

Michael Buster

Dialect Coach

Cory Butler

Assistant

Richard Byard

Assistant Editor

Douglas Byers

Electrician

Denny Caira

Transportation Coordinator

Marc Caldera

Stunts

Ed Calderon

Foreman

Camille Calvet

Makeup

Carol Campbell

Hair Stylist

Keith Campbell

Stunt Double

Roy Cancino

Special Effects Technician

Brian Cantwell

Digital Effects Artist

Elaine Cantwell

Graphic Designer

Lois Carl

Tutor

Antoinette Carr

Hair Stylist

David Carriker

Digital Effects

Mark Casey

Digital Effects Artist

Sean Casey

Photography

Lori Casler

Software Engineer

Mike Cassidy

Props

Tony Cecere

Stunts

Lanny Cermak

Digital Effects Artist

Dianne Chadwick

Graphic Designer

J. André Chaintreuil

Set Designer

Denise Chamian

Casting Director

Lawrence Chandler

Digital Effects Artist

Michael Chang

Visual Effects Supervisor

Joshua Chapel

Special Effects Technician

Martin Charles

Graphic Designer

Matt Checkowski

Visual Effects

Simon Cheung

Modelmaker

David Y Chow

Set Designer

Henry Christian

Electrician

Richard Chuang

Special Effects

Kaiser Clark

Assistant

Lee Clay

Assistant

Kelly Clear

Gaffer

Karen B Clem

Costumer

Robert Clot

Special Effects Technician

Thomas Cloutier

Special Effects Technician

James Clyne

Concept Artist

Ed Cofer

Other

Ardis Cohen

Hair Stylist

Jon Cohen

Screenplay

Matt Cohen

Video

Webster Colcord

Animator

Zachary Cole

Software Engineer

Steve C Collins

Foreman

Begona Colomar

Color Timer

Kyrsten Mate Comoglio

Sound Effects Editor

Mark Comperry

Foreman

Joseph Conenna

Props Buyer

Robert Consing

Storyboard Artist

Denis Cordova

Foreman

Damian Costa

Grip

John Countryman

Sound

Patrick Crane

Assistant Editor

Travis Crenshaw

Foley Recordist

Shannon Crimmins

Production Secretary

Brandon Criswell

2-D Artist

Eric Vincent Cruse

Grip

Mike Cuevas

Apprentice Editor

Chris Culliton

Electrician

John Cummins

Digital Effects Artist

Bonnie Curtis

Producer

Brian Cuscino

Digital Effects Artist

Michele Cusick

Assistant

Johanna D'amato

Production Assistant

Patti Dalzell

Script Supervisor

Marsha Daniels

On-Set Dresser

Charles Darby

Matte Painter

Melissa Darby

Visual Effects Producer

Cass Darmody

Office Assistant

Lorelei David

Visual Effects Editor

George Davis

Special Effects

Glenn R Davis

Best Boy Grip

Michael Day

Special Effects

Jan De Bont

Producer

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Lindy De Quattro

Animation Supervisor

Lee Anne De Vette

Assistant

Stefan Dechant

Concept Artist

Film Details

Also Known As
Sentencia previa
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Thriller
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
2002
Distribution Company
20TH CENTURY FOX DISTRIBUTION/AMBLIN PARTNERS
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Washington, DC, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 20m

Award Nominations

Best Sound Editing

2002

Articles

Minority Report


Steven Spielberg was in the midst of an especially prolific stage of his career when he directed Minority Report (2002), one of his best films and the second of three big movies he turned out in quick succession. (The others: A.I. Artificial Intelligence [2001] and Catch Me If You Can [2002].) While Minority Report and A.I. can both be labeled as science fiction, all three films are quite different tonally, the result of a conscious effort by Spielberg to branch out and try new things. As he said at the time: "I'm at a period where I'm experimenting. I want to challenge myself and, in turn, challenge the audience. I'm trying to find myself in my mid-fifties."

Of the specific challenges of Minority Report, he said, "I wanted to make the ugliest, dirtiest movie I have ever made. I want this movie to be dark and grainy, and to be really cold. This isn't a warm adventure the way A.I. was. This is, rather, the rough and tumble, gritty world of film noir."

Set in 2054, Minority Report stars Tom Cruise as John Anderton, a police captain in the "Pre-Crime" unit with the ability -- thanks to "Pre-Cogs" who can see into the future -- to apprehend would-be criminals before they commit their crimes. But when Anderton himself is revealed by the Pre-Cogs as the murderer of someone in three days' time -- someone Anderton doesn't even know -- he must go on the run and solve the mystery before he himself is caught.

Based on a 1956 short story by Philip K. Dick, whose work had also been adapted into Blade Runner (1982) and Total Recall (1990), Minority Report uses its thrilling surface tale to delve thoughtfully into questions of paranoia, free will, existentialism, alternate reality, memory, media culture, technology and politics. The material was tailor-made for a thoughtful film adaptation.

The property had been floating around the Fox studio for a decade, originally intended as a sequel to Total Recall, with various filmmakers interested at one time or another. In 1997, director (and former cinematographer) Jan de Bont optioned the story and commissioned a screenplay by writer Jon Cohen. Tom Cruise read the draft and shared it with Steven Spielberg. The two had met in 1983 and agreed to one day work together should the right script come along; this was it, and they attached themselves to the project immediately. Scott Frank was hired to do a rewrite, and the film went into production in 2001, the soonest time that Spielberg and Cruise were both available.

The film's portrait of the future was treated with great care. Spielberg organized a conference of leading architects, urban planners, professors, computer technicians, crime fighters and scientists one weekend in Santa Monica, Calif., to discuss how society might look and operate in 2054. Spielberg wanted the film to come off as plausibly as possible.

One prediction that drew unanimous agreement was for a near-total loss of privacy. "Not so people can spy on you," said screenwriter Scott Frank, "but so they can sell to you. In the not too distant future, it is plausible that by scanning your eyes, your whereabouts will be tracked. They will keep track of what you buy, so they can keep on selling to you."

Spielberg agreed, noting (in 2002) that "Orwell's prophecy really comes true, not in the twentieth century but in the twenty-first. Big Brother is watching us now, and what little privacy we have will completely evaporate in twenty or thirty years."

One piece of futuristic technology in the film that especially caught the imagination of moviegoers was the motion-operated computer used by Tom Cruise in some stunning set-pieces. By waving and gesticulating with his hands in the air in front of a giant computer, Cruise is able to manipulate images and data on screen. This technology has not only since been portrayed in other movies but now exists in the real world, though it is not yet as fluid or perfect as that depicted here.

Critics took note of Minority Report's striking portrayal of the future. Variety critic Todd McCarthy wrote that the film "offers the most persuasively detailed portrait modern Hollywood has created of what the United States may look like 50 years hence." Overall, McCarthy found the film "outstanding... in line with what American films have historically done best, which is to excitingly tell a strong story with high style and just enough substance."

To achieve Spielberg's desired "ugly," grainy look, cinematographer Janusz Kaminski employed a number of tricks. One was to shoot the film in Super-35mm (a first for both Kaminski and Spielberg) and use certain filters and lenses such that when the film was blown up optically for release in anamorphic widescreen prints, "the highlights got slightly brighter, the shadows got slightly harder and the colors got slightly more pastel-ish."

Kaminski also said that he most often used wide-angle lenses (never longer than 27mm) because "Steven likes the actors to be as close to the camera as possible... He's very much an old-fashioned filmmaker in terms of how he tells his stories. That seems like a very tricky statement because his movies are so technologically advanced, but when you see a special effect in Steven's movies, you can experience it in a wide shot. He likes to see action play in one continuous shot rather than being interrupted by an editor's cut... We staged a lot of scenes in wide shots that have a lot of things happening within the frame. Of course, there is plenty of quick cutting in the film because there are extensive action sequences, but many scenes are about people and emotions, and we often let the emotions play out in a single wide shot."

Kaminski's most interesting trick, however, was to desaturate and mute the film's colors by employing a "bleach bypass" system. Normally in negative processing, the film emulsion is bleached. By skipping this step, the film ends up looking like a simultaneous color and black-and-white image, resulting in increased grain and contrast. Kaminski said, "The process pulled about 40 percent of the color out of the image, but we worked to get that back in by adding more color to the lights. Overall, the image has a bleached-out quality with deep shadows and blown highlights."

The mesmerizing and intense Minority Report garnered excellent reviews and was a solid hit with audiences, grossing $350 worldwide. It received a single Oscar® nomination, for Best Sound Editing, but lost to The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002).

During filming, Tom Cruise started dating Penelope Cruz, which became public when they flew to a private island near Fiji for a vacation. A month later, Cruise and Nicole Kidman would divorce.

By Jeremy Arnold

SOURCES:
Jay Holben, "Criminal Intent," article in July 2002 American Cinematographer
Ian Johnstone, Tom Cruise: All the World's a Stage
Andrew Morton, Tom Cruise: An Unauthorized Biography
Warren Buckland, Directed by Steven Spielberg: Poetics of the Contemporary Hollywood Blockbuster
Frank Sanello, Spielberg: The Man, The Movies, The Mythology
Andrew M. Cohen, Empire of Dreams: The Science Fiction and Fantasy Films of Steven Spielberg
Minority Report

Minority Report

Steven Spielberg was in the midst of an especially prolific stage of his career when he directed Minority Report (2002), one of his best films and the second of three big movies he turned out in quick succession. (The others: A.I. Artificial Intelligence [2001] and Catch Me If You Can [2002].) While Minority Report and A.I. can both be labeled as science fiction, all three films are quite different tonally, the result of a conscious effort by Spielberg to branch out and try new things. As he said at the time: "I'm at a period where I'm experimenting. I want to challenge myself and, in turn, challenge the audience. I'm trying to find myself in my mid-fifties." Of the specific challenges of Minority Report, he said, "I wanted to make the ugliest, dirtiest movie I have ever made. I want this movie to be dark and grainy, and to be really cold. This isn't a warm adventure the way A.I. was. This is, rather, the rough and tumble, gritty world of film noir." Set in 2054, Minority Report stars Tom Cruise as John Anderton, a police captain in the "Pre-Crime" unit with the ability -- thanks to "Pre-Cogs" who can see into the future -- to apprehend would-be criminals before they commit their crimes. But when Anderton himself is revealed by the Pre-Cogs as the murderer of someone in three days' time -- someone Anderton doesn't even know -- he must go on the run and solve the mystery before he himself is caught. Based on a 1956 short story by Philip K. Dick, whose work had also been adapted into Blade Runner (1982) and Total Recall (1990), Minority Report uses its thrilling surface tale to delve thoughtfully into questions of paranoia, free will, existentialism, alternate reality, memory, media culture, technology and politics. The material was tailor-made for a thoughtful film adaptation. The property had been floating around the Fox studio for a decade, originally intended as a sequel to Total Recall, with various filmmakers interested at one time or another. In 1997, director (and former cinematographer) Jan de Bont optioned the story and commissioned a screenplay by writer Jon Cohen. Tom Cruise read the draft and shared it with Steven Spielberg. The two had met in 1983 and agreed to one day work together should the right script come along; this was it, and they attached themselves to the project immediately. Scott Frank was hired to do a rewrite, and the film went into production in 2001, the soonest time that Spielberg and Cruise were both available. The film's portrait of the future was treated with great care. Spielberg organized a conference of leading architects, urban planners, professors, computer technicians, crime fighters and scientists one weekend in Santa Monica, Calif., to discuss how society might look and operate in 2054. Spielberg wanted the film to come off as plausibly as possible. One prediction that drew unanimous agreement was for a near-total loss of privacy. "Not so people can spy on you," said screenwriter Scott Frank, "but so they can sell to you. In the not too distant future, it is plausible that by scanning your eyes, your whereabouts will be tracked. They will keep track of what you buy, so they can keep on selling to you." Spielberg agreed, noting (in 2002) that "Orwell's prophecy really comes true, not in the twentieth century but in the twenty-first. Big Brother is watching us now, and what little privacy we have will completely evaporate in twenty or thirty years." One piece of futuristic technology in the film that especially caught the imagination of moviegoers was the motion-operated computer used by Tom Cruise in some stunning set-pieces. By waving and gesticulating with his hands in the air in front of a giant computer, Cruise is able to manipulate images and data on screen. This technology has not only since been portrayed in other movies but now exists in the real world, though it is not yet as fluid or perfect as that depicted here. Critics took note of Minority Report's striking portrayal of the future. Variety critic Todd McCarthy wrote that the film "offers the most persuasively detailed portrait modern Hollywood has created of what the United States may look like 50 years hence." Overall, McCarthy found the film "outstanding... in line with what American films have historically done best, which is to excitingly tell a strong story with high style and just enough substance." To achieve Spielberg's desired "ugly," grainy look, cinematographer Janusz Kaminski employed a number of tricks. One was to shoot the film in Super-35mm (a first for both Kaminski and Spielberg) and use certain filters and lenses such that when the film was blown up optically for release in anamorphic widescreen prints, "the highlights got slightly brighter, the shadows got slightly harder and the colors got slightly more pastel-ish." Kaminski also said that he most often used wide-angle lenses (never longer than 27mm) because "Steven likes the actors to be as close to the camera as possible... He's very much an old-fashioned filmmaker in terms of how he tells his stories. That seems like a very tricky statement because his movies are so technologically advanced, but when you see a special effect in Steven's movies, you can experience it in a wide shot. He likes to see action play in one continuous shot rather than being interrupted by an editor's cut... We staged a lot of scenes in wide shots that have a lot of things happening within the frame. Of course, there is plenty of quick cutting in the film because there are extensive action sequences, but many scenes are about people and emotions, and we often let the emotions play out in a single wide shot." Kaminski's most interesting trick, however, was to desaturate and mute the film's colors by employing a "bleach bypass" system. Normally in negative processing, the film emulsion is bleached. By skipping this step, the film ends up looking like a simultaneous color and black-and-white image, resulting in increased grain and contrast. Kaminski said, "The process pulled about 40 percent of the color out of the image, but we worked to get that back in by adding more color to the lights. Overall, the image has a bleached-out quality with deep shadows and blown highlights." The mesmerizing and intense Minority Report garnered excellent reviews and was a solid hit with audiences, grossing $350 worldwide. It received a single Oscar® nomination, for Best Sound Editing, but lost to The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002). During filming, Tom Cruise started dating Penelope Cruz, which became public when they flew to a private island near Fiji for a vacation. A month later, Cruise and Nicole Kidman would divorce. By Jeremy Arnold SOURCES: Jay Holben, "Criminal Intent," article in July 2002 American Cinematographer Ian Johnstone, Tom Cruise: All the World's a Stage Andrew Morton, Tom Cruise: An Unauthorized Biography Warren Buckland, Directed by Steven Spielberg: Poetics of the Contemporary Hollywood Blockbuster Frank Sanello, Spielberg: The Man, The Movies, The Mythology Andrew M. Cohen, Empire of Dreams: The Science Fiction and Fantasy Films of Steven Spielberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the 2002 award for Best Supporting Actress (Samatha Morton) by the Online Film Critics Society.

Released in United States Summer June 21, 2002

Released in United States on Video December 17, 2002

Kodak Film Stock

Released in United States Summer June 21, 2002

Released in United States on Video December 17, 2002

Nominated for the 2002 award for Best Director by the Broadcast Film Critics Association.