Romance on the High Seas


1h 39m 1948
Romance on the High Seas

Brief Synopsis

A singer on a Caribbean cruise gets mixed up in a series of romantic problems.

Film Details

Also Known As
Romance in High C
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Musical
Release Date
Jul 3, 1948
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 26 Jun 1948
Production Company
Michael Curtiz Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Bahia,Brazil; Cartagena,Columbia; Rio de Janeiro,Brazil

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

Michael and Elvira Kent love each other, but each jealously suspects the other of being unfaithful. On their third anniversary, Elvira visits a travel agent to plan a cruise to Rio and, while there, meets Georgia Garrett, an impoverished singer who amuses herself by planning trips that she can never afford to take. When Mike suddenly cancels the trip for business reasons, Elvira suspects that he is really staying in town because of his attractive new secretary, Miss Medwick. Lazlo Lazlo, Elvira's uncle and the owner of the pharmaceutical company that employs Mike, suggests that Elivra travel to Rio alone. Elvira then decides that she will pretend to leave town, sending Georgia in her place, and that way catch Mike in an infidelity. After Elvira plots the deception with Georgia, however, Mike announces that he will be finished with his business earlier than planned and will be able to join her in Rio. When Elvira nervously objects, Mike becomes convinced that she is having an affair and hires private detective Peter Virgil to follow her aboard the ship. The first night out, Peter and Georgia, who is posing as Elvira, meet and, from then on, spend all their time together. Peter reports to Mike that "Elvira" is definitely traveling alone, and to her dismay, Elvira discovers nothing untoward about Mike. Meanwhile, Georgia is almost exposed when Oscar Farrar, her pianist boyfriend, unexpectedly arrives on the ship. When she sees him, Georgia claims to be sick, and stays in her room. Despite her efforts, Oscar discovers her new identity and visits her cabin. Peter spots them through the porthole and thinks that he has finally discovered Elvira's lover. Later, Georgia tells Oscar that she has fallen in love with another man. In Rio, Peter, still thinking that Georgia is Elvira, tells Mike that he has fallen in love with his wife. Mike immediately flies to Rio, and Lazlo advises Elvira to do the same. After much confusion, Georgia is hired for a high salary as a singer at a Rio hotel, and Pete learns her real identity. The couple are happily reunited, as are Mike and Elvira.

Cast

Jack Carson

Peter Virgil

Janis Paige

Elvira Kent

Don Defore

Michael Kent

Doris Day

Georgia Garrett

Oscar Levant

Oscar Fararr

S. Z. Sakall

Lazlo Lazlo

Fortunio Bonanova

Plinio

Eric Blore

Ship's doctor

Franklin Pangborn

Rio hotel clerk

Leslie Brooks

Miss Medwick

William Bakewell

Travel agent

Johnny Berkes

The drunk

The Samba Kings

Avon Long

The Cavanaugh Trio

Sir Lancelot

Kenneth Britton

Bartender

Frank Dae

Minister

John Holland

Best man

Janet Warren

Organist

Carlos Barbé

Young man on aisle

John Alvin

Travel agent

Wheaton Chambers

Photographer

Douglas Kennedy

Car salesman

George Neise

Michael's assistant

Ray Montgomery

Michael's assistant

Larry Rio

Cab driver

Lennie Bremen

Headwaiter

Mary Field

Elvira's maid

Tristram Coffin

Headwaiter on ship

Emory Johnson

Young man on deck

Ted Stanhope

Steward

Eddie Parks

Steward

Martin Mason

Steward

George Boyce

Steward

Frances Rey

Cuban telephone operator

Sandra Gould

N.Y. telephone operator

Frank Scannell

Purser

Grady Sutton

Radio operator

Martin Wilkins

Waiter

Cyril Smith

English bartender

George Moro

Cuban waiter

Barbara Bates

Stewardess on plane

Fred Godoy

Rio doorman

George Suzanne

Rio bellboy

Robert Cabal

Rio bellboy

G. Pat Collins

Private detective

Victor Zimmerman

Charles the chauffeur

John Arnold

Rio headwaiter

Ramon Ros

Assistant hotel clerk

Suzanne Rosser

Brazilian girl

Norma Brown

Brazilian girl

Phyllis Forbes

Brazilian girl

Wendy Lee

Brazilian girl

Mary Benoit

Passenger on ship

Ruth Lewis

Passenger on ship

Gerry Ganzer

Passenger on ship

Jerry Jarman

Passenger on ship

Rosemary Pettit

Passenger on ship

Maria Belmar

Portuguese woman

Photo Collections

Romance on the High Seas - Lobby Cards
Here are a few Lobby Cards from Romance on the High Seas (1948), starring Doris Day. Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.

Film Details

Also Known As
Romance in High C
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Musical
Release Date
Jul 3, 1948
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 26 Jun 1948
Production Company
Michael Curtiz Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Bahia,Brazil; Cartagena,Columbia; Rio de Janeiro,Brazil

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Score

1948

Best Song

1948

Articles

We Strike Up the Band for Doris Day's Debut!


DICK DINMAN & GEORGE FELTENSTEIN STRIKE UP THE BAND FOR DORIS DAY'S DEBUT! (Click Here to Listen): ROMANCE ON THE HIGH SEAS marked Doris Day's sparkling silver screen debut and Warner Home Video's Senior Vice President of Classic and Theatrical Marketing George Feltenstein and producer/host Dick Dinman marvel at the countless buoyant delights of this utterly charming musical comedy romance which has just been spectacularly restored on Blu-ray to Technicolorful perfection by the Warner Archive.

PLUS: MICKEY! JUDY!! STRIKE UP THE BAND!!!

The award-winning DICK DINMAN'S DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR is the only show devoted to Golden Age Movie Classics as they become available on DVD and Blu-ray. Your producer/host Dick Dinman includes a generous selection of classic scenes, classic film music and one-on-one interviews with stars, producers, and directors. To hear these as well as other DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR shows please go to www.dvdclassicscorner.com or www.dvdclassicscorner.net.


We Strike Up The Band For Doris Day's Debut!

We Strike Up the Band for Doris Day's Debut!

DICK DINMAN & GEORGE FELTENSTEIN STRIKE UP THE BAND FOR DORIS DAY'S DEBUT! (Click Here to Listen): ROMANCE ON THE HIGH SEAS marked Doris Day's sparkling silver screen debut and Warner Home Video's Senior Vice President of Classic and Theatrical Marketing George Feltenstein and producer/host Dick Dinman marvel at the countless buoyant delights of this utterly charming musical comedy romance which has just been spectacularly restored on Blu-ray to Technicolorful perfection by the Warner Archive. PLUS: MICKEY! JUDY!! STRIKE UP THE BAND!!! The award-winning DICK DINMAN'S DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR is the only show devoted to Golden Age Movie Classics as they become available on DVD and Blu-ray. Your producer/host Dick Dinman includes a generous selection of classic scenes, classic film music and one-on-one interviews with stars, producers, and directors. To hear these as well as other DVD CLASSICS CORNER ON THE AIR shows please go to www.dvdclassicscorner.com or www.dvdclassicscorner.net.

Romance on the High Seas


For its elaborate musical comedy Romance on the High Seas (1948), Warner Bros. had arranged to borrow Judy Garland from MGM. When Garland proved unavailable, the next choice was Paramount’s Betty Hutton -- who was forced to drop out at the last minute because she was pregnant. Desperate for a replacement as production was scheduled to begin, the film’s songwriters, Jule Styne and Sammy Cahn, happened to hear a young band singer named Doris Day singing at a Hollywood party. At the urging of Styne and Cahn, Day reluctantly agreed to audition for the movie’s director, Michael Curtiz.

At 23, Day already had become a recording star thanks to her million-selling "Sentimental Journey," and had worked with Les Brown, Bob Hope and Frank Sinatra. She was at an unhappy point in her personal life, having divorced a violent first husband and separated from a second, and had become discouraged with her chances at film work. With her small son, Terry, she was planning to abandon Hollywood and return to her hometown of Cincinnati when she showed up for the meeting with Curtiz. According to Day biographer Eric Braun, she arrived without having made any special effort about her appearance and, midway through her audition song, "Embraceable You," burst into tears. When Cahn took her aside and explained that Curtiz was looking for a Betty Hutton type, someone who sang and bounced around, Day replied, "I don’t bounce around. I just sing." To her utter astonishment, Curtiz -- impressed with her honesty and obvious talent -- offered her the role on the spot.

In the movie, Day plays a struggling nightclub singer who poses as a wealthy socialite on a South American cruise so the real socialite (Janis Paige) can stay home to spy on her husband (Don DeFore). Also on hand is Jack Carson, who befriended Day in real life and taught her tricks of the trade of movie acting. Despite her inexperience in film, Day delivered with such confidence and natural effervescence that audiences everywhere fell in love and a major movie star was born. Warner Bros. now had its own musical leading lady with no need to borrow from other studios. "It’s Magic," the Oscar-nominated song from the film, proved another huge hit for Day and became one of her signature tunes. The movie also was nominated for Best Scoring of a Musical Picture.

Producers: Michael Curtiz, Alex Gottlieb
Director: Michael Curtiz
Screenplay: Julius J. Epstein, Philip G. Epstein, I.A.L. Diamond, from story "Romance in High C" by Carlos A. Olivari and Sixto Pondal Rios
Cinematography: Elwood Bredell
Art Direction: Anton Grot
Original Music: Ray Heindorf, Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn, Oscar Levant
Editing: Rudi Fehr
Costume Design: Milo Anderson
Principal Cast: Jack Carson (Peter Virgil), Janis Paige (Elvira Kent), Don DeFore (Michael Kent), Doris Day (Georgia Garrett), Oscar Levant (Oscar Farrar), S.Z. Sakall (Uncle Lazlo), Fortunio Bonanova (Plinio).
C-100m. Closed captioning.

by Roger Fristoe

Romance on the High Seas

For its elaborate musical comedy Romance on the High Seas (1948), Warner Bros. had arranged to borrow Judy Garland from MGM. When Garland proved unavailable, the next choice was Paramount’s Betty Hutton -- who was forced to drop out at the last minute because she was pregnant. Desperate for a replacement as production was scheduled to begin, the film’s songwriters, Jule Styne and Sammy Cahn, happened to hear a young band singer named Doris Day singing at a Hollywood party. At the urging of Styne and Cahn, Day reluctantly agreed to audition for the movie’s director, Michael Curtiz. At 23, Day already had become a recording star thanks to her million-selling "Sentimental Journey," and had worked with Les Brown, Bob Hope and Frank Sinatra. She was at an unhappy point in her personal life, having divorced a violent first husband and separated from a second, and had become discouraged with her chances at film work. With her small son, Terry, she was planning to abandon Hollywood and return to her hometown of Cincinnati when she showed up for the meeting with Curtiz. According to Day biographer Eric Braun, she arrived without having made any special effort about her appearance and, midway through her audition song, "Embraceable You," burst into tears. When Cahn took her aside and explained that Curtiz was looking for a Betty Hutton type, someone who sang and bounced around, Day replied, "I don’t bounce around. I just sing." To her utter astonishment, Curtiz -- impressed with her honesty and obvious talent -- offered her the role on the spot. In the movie, Day plays a struggling nightclub singer who poses as a wealthy socialite on a South American cruise so the real socialite (Janis Paige) can stay home to spy on her husband (Don DeFore). Also on hand is Jack Carson, who befriended Day in real life and taught her tricks of the trade of movie acting. Despite her inexperience in film, Day delivered with such confidence and natural effervescence that audiences everywhere fell in love and a major movie star was born. Warner Bros. now had its own musical leading lady with no need to borrow from other studios. "It’s Magic," the Oscar-nominated song from the film, proved another huge hit for Day and became one of her signature tunes. The movie also was nominated for Best Scoring of a Musical Picture. Producers: Michael Curtiz, Alex Gottlieb Director: Michael Curtiz Screenplay: Julius J. Epstein, Philip G. Epstein, I.A.L. Diamond, from story "Romance in High C" by Carlos A. Olivari and Sixto Pondal Rios Cinematography: Elwood Bredell Art Direction: Anton Grot Original Music: Ray Heindorf, Jule Styne, Sammy Cahn, Oscar Levant Editing: Rudi Fehr Costume Design: Milo Anderson Principal Cast: Jack Carson (Peter Virgil), Janis Paige (Elvira Kent), Don DeFore (Michael Kent), Doris Day (Georgia Garrett), Oscar Levant (Oscar Farrar), S.Z. Sakall (Uncle Lazlo), Fortunio Bonanova (Plinio). C-100m. Closed captioning. by Roger Fristoe

Quotes

To think we gave up a perfectly good rib!
- Oscar Farrar

Trivia

Planned to star 'Garland, Judy' , but Betty Hutton was cast instead. Hutton became pregnant, so 'Day, Doris' was given the role.

Released in England as "It's Magic", after the success of the song.

Notes

The film's working title was Romance in High C. According to a July 17, 1946 Hollywood Reporter news item, sequences were shot in Cartagena, Columbia, and in Rio de Janeiro and Bahia, Brazil. This film marked popular band singer Doris Day's film debut and the beginning of her successful career at Warner Bros., to which she was under contract until the mid-1950s. According to modern sources, the role of "Georgia Garrett" was originally intended for Judy Garland, but negotiations with M-G-M fell through. The part was also offered to Betty Hutton, who subsequently became pregnant. Composer Jule Styne, who had heard Day sing "Embraceable You" at a party, then arranged for her to meet director Michael Curtiz. Jule Styne and Sammy Cahn's song "It's Magic" was nominated for an Oscar.