The Sea Chase


1h 57m 1955
The Sea Chase

Brief Synopsis

A German freighter captain tries to elude the British in the early days of World War II.

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Drama
Adventure
War
Adaptation
Release Date
Jun 4, 1955
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Honolulu, Hawaii, United States; Kona , Hawaii, United States; Hawaii, United States; Hawaii, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Sea Chase by Andrew Geer (New York, 1948).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 57m
Sound
4-Track Stereo (35 mm magnetic prints) (RCA Sound System), Mono (35 mm optical prints)
Color
Color (Warnercolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.55 : 1

Synopsis

Just prior to World War II, at Australia's Sydney Harbor, Commander Jeffrey Napier of the British Navy visits old family friend, Karl Ehrlich, the German captain of the decrepit freighter Ergenstrasse . Although he lost his German Navy commission for refusing to support Nazism, Karl remains loyal to his homeland and shows Jeff an Imperial German flag he still keeps in a drawer. Because the Nazis have just invaded Poland and war seems imminent, Jeff informs Karl that the British are interning the Ergenstrasse . Jeff then introduces Karl to his fiancée, Elsa Keller, unaware that they are already acquainted. When Karl is alone with Elsa, he warns her to leave Jeff alone or he will tell Jeff about the men she has destroyed in the past. She leaves Jeff, vowing to get even with Karl. Later, despite a shortage of fuel and provisions, Karl is determined to elude the British and return the Ergenstrasse to Germany. As Karl prepares to leave, the German Consul-General reveals that Elsa is a secret agent and orders him to take her with him. After slipping his boat out of the harbor during a fog, Karl sails south to elude the British. His relationship with Elsa remains icy, but his first mate, Kirchner, is attracted to her and tries to impress her with his Nazi party connections. At Auckland Island, the site of an international shipwreck station, Karl sends Kirchner ashore for supplies. After taking provisions from three Scottish fisherman marooned there, Kirchner kills them in cold blood, but reports to Karl that he left them in good condition. Later, the crew reports that they are running short of coal, prompting Karl to order that all wooden items on board be burned for fuel. Still low on wood, Karl orders that the lifeboats be split and burned. When several crewmen, among them Schleiter, balk at destroying their means of survival if the ship goes down, Karl begins to chop the boats himself. The British ship Rockhampton , on which Jeff serves as executive officer, is sent to pursue the Ergenstrasse and Jeff's knowledge of Karl helps them focus their search. They discover the murders at Auckland Island and Jeff, believing that Karl is responsible, feels hatred toward his former friend. Karl anchors off the islands of Pom Pom Galli, where he drives the crew hard to gather food and fuel. Realizing that the cook's mate, Max Heinz, suffers a weak heart, Karl assigns him the easier task of lookout. Disaster strikes when one of the men, Winkler, is injured while chopping wood and another, Cadet Walter Stemme, is attacked by a shark and lies dying of gangrene. Aware that the Rockhampton is near, Karl considers calling the doctor on board for help, but, knowing that medical attention cannot save Stemme and the crew would be arrested as war criminals, he decides against it. One crewman accuses Karl of "playing God," and Stemme, who overhears their conversation, kills himself to prevent risking the lives of his mates. Instead of burying Stemme at sea, Karl leaves the injured Winkler and sickly Max on the island to bury him, knowing that they will be found and treated by the doctor aboard the Rockhampton . Elsa comes to appreciate Karl's integrity and strong convictions, and shares with him her struggle for survival after the suicide of her father. As they begin to care for each other, she takes a personal interest in the crewmen's welfare. When Karl hears radio reports about the Auckland Island murders, he orders Kirchner to write and sign a confession in the captain's log book, which he plans to use as evidence for Kirchner's court-martial when they land in Germany. After being rescued, Max and Winkler report to Jeff's captain that the Ergenstrasse sank after an onboard explosion. Unconvinced, Jeff and his captain continue their pursuit. When the Ergenstrasse arrives at the neutral port of Valparaiso, Karl is greeted by newsmen and photographers, who report his story as a daring escape by a Nazi hero. After the Nazis claim that the report of the murders is a British fabrication, Jeff demands that Karl issue a public retraction. Ordered by his superiors to conceal the truth, Karl replies that the truth is in his logbook, then mourns the sacrifice of his personal honor. Elsa guesses what happened and confronts Kirchner, who remains unapologetic. After the Rockhampton is assigned to a more important mission, Jeff, feeling personally obliged to bring Karl to justice, asks to be transferred to a patrol boat in the North Sea, through which the Ergenstrasse must pass to reach Germany. After his ship has been refitted and refueled, Karl prepares for the remainder of his journey, expecting that most of his crew will choose to stay in Valparaiso. To his surprise, every man returns aboard, including Schleiter, whom he has grown to respect and who sheepishly reveals a slogan tattood on his back by pranksters when he was passed out from drinking that reads, "Britannia rules the waves." Elsa, who has been ordered to remain in Valparaiso, begs Karl to remain with her. Although he admits he loves her, Karl feels he must try to bring the ship home. Before the ship leaves, Elsa joins him onboard. Later, off the coast of the Netherlands, the Ergenstrasse encounters a violent storm. As Jeff's patrol boat closes in, Karl forces Kirchner to remain aboard with him, then orders Elsa and the crew into lifeboats, and gives them the logbook to deliver to Jeff. After Karl sets the freighter at full throttle toward the patrol boat, he discovers that Elsa is still with him. When a shell from the patrol boat explodes the freighter's boiler, Karl and Elsa raise the Imperial German flag, then board the last lifeboat. Although the freighter sinks, its crew is rescued by the patrol boat. From Karl's logbook, Jeff learns that his friend is innocent of the murders and initiates a search for him, but Karl and Elsa are never seen again.

Cast

John Wayne

Karl Ehrlich

Lana Turner

Elsa Keller

David Farrar

Commander Jeffrey Napier

Lyle Bettger

Kirchner

Tab Hunter

Cadet Wesser

James Arness

Schleiter

Dick Davalos

Cadet Walter Stemme

John Qualen

Schmidt

Paul Fix

Max Heinz

Lowell Gilmore

Capt. Evans

Luis Van Rooten

Matz

Alan Hale [jr.]

Wentz

Wilton Graff

Hepke

Peter Whitney

Bachman

Claude Akins

Winkler

John Doucette

Bo'sun

Alan Lee

Brounck

Adam Williams

Kruger

Gil Perkins

Baldhead

Fred Stromsoe

Mueller

James Lilburn

Sub-lieutenant

Tony Travers

Sub-lieutenant

John Indrisano

Sub-lieutenant

Joey Ray

Sub-lieutenant

Loren Brown

Seaman

Gail Robinson

Seaman

Joe Brooks

Seaman

Frank Losee

Seaman

Cameron Grant

Kruse

John O'malley

Hawkinson

Gavin Muir

Officer-of-the-watch

Dick Lupino

Officer-of-the-watch

Patrick O'moore

Officer-of-the-watch

John Dodsworth

Officer-of-the-watch

Harold Dyrenforth

Dutch reporter

Ed Coch

Chilean reporter

Charles Wagenheim

American reporter

Edward Colman

Hotel manager

Trudie Wyler

Maid

Alma Beltran

Beautician

Pilar Del Rey

Beautician

Jean De Briac

French governor

Antony Eustrel

British vice-admiral

Gloria Dea

Spanish girl

Josephine Para

Spanish girl

Lucita

Spanish girl

Isabel Dwan

Spanish girl

Theresa Tudor

Fraulein

Renata Huy

Fraulein

Victor Bartell

News photographer

Eddie Lebaron

News photographer

Abdullah Abbas

News photographer

Gilchrist Stuart

Fisherman

James Fairfax

Signal yeoman

Bruce Lester

Petty officer

Stuart Holmes

Watchman

Richard Binder

Dining room patron

John Sheffield

Dining room patron

Ken Bischof

British sailor

Ray Linn

Singer

William Lee

Singer

Charles Shrouder

Singer

William Reeve

Singer

Lee Gotch

Singer

Nacho Galindo

Tudor Owen

Roger Creed

Crew

Franz Bachelin

Art Director

Joe Barry

Loc Manager

Gordon Bau

Makeup

James Warner Bellah

Screenwriter

Carl Benoit

Loc man

Chas. A. Bonniwell Jr.

Loc auditor

Herbert E. Cheek

Props shop

John Ciorga

Swing gang

John Ciorga

Swing gang

Howard Claire

2d grip

William Clothier

Director of Photography

Emmett Emerson

Assistant Director

Robert Erbes

Plumber

Robert E. Farmer

Best Boy

John Farrow

Composer

John Farrow

Producer

Argon Faught

First aid

Henry Fields

Wardrobe

Sam Friedle

Script Supervisor

Henry H. Fuhrman

Carpenter foreman

Jacob Gade

Composer

Ed. J. Gaj

Camera mechanic

Edwin S. Hall

Cableman

William Hauff

Composer

Ray Heindorf

Composer

Adean Henderson

Wardrobe

Stuart Higgs

Assistant Camera

George Hopewell

Painter

Horace L. Hulburd

Special Effects

M. K. Jerome

Composer

Robert P. Johannes

Camera Operator

H. F. Koenekamp

Special Effects

Russell Llewellyn

Assistant Director

Moss Mabry

Wardrobe

Gilbert Mandelik

Assistant Director

Maxwell Mann

Generator man

Owen Marks

Film Editor

Wally Meinardus

Assistant Camera

Robert P. Miller

Sound Recording

J. A. Neil

Swing gang

Harold Noyes

Head grip

Webb Overlander

Makeup

Ralph D. Owen

Gaffer

Maurice De Packh

Orchestration

Jackson Parks

Publicist

Weldon Patterson

Assistant props

Norman Pringle

Makeup

Leonid Raab

Orchestration

Leon Roberts

Wardrobe

Victor L. Scheckel

Greens man

Francis J. Scheid

Sound

Jack Scholl

Composer

Eugene C. Steiner

Radio op

Myrtle Stoltz

Hairdresser

Johann Strauss

Composer

William A. Thompson

Boom Operator

Robert Turner

Props

John Twist

Screenwriter

William Wallace

Set Decoration

Roy Webb

Music

Roy Webb

Composer

John W. Woods

Stills

William Ziegler

Film Editor

Videos

Movie Clip

Sea Chase, The (1955) - Ehrlich Was Like A Fox David Farrar narrates as British naval officer Napier, pursuing John Wayne, as the conflicted Captain Ehrlich of the German steamer Ergenstrasse, trying to avoid capture in the South Pacific in the early days of WWII, as his Nazi spy passenger Elsa (Lana Turner) is approached by his sneaky officer Kirchner (Lyle Bettger), in The Sea Chase, 1955.
Sea Chase, The (1955) - Against The New Regime Days before their countries are expected to go to war, British officer Napier (David Farrar) brings his German fiancee' Elsa (Lana Turner) to meet his old family friend, also-German Captain Ehrlich (John Wayne), a former naval officer who refused to become a Nazi, on his freighter docked at Sydney, in The Sea Chase, 1955.
Sea Chase, The (1955) - Muster All Hands Departing Sydney, Australia, just after the declaration of WWII, anti-Nazi German freighter captain Ehrlich (John Wayne) instructs his crew on avoiding British patrols, then tells Elsa (Lana Turner), an old acquaintance and Nazi spy whom he's been ordered to transport, to stay out of sight, in The Sea Chase, 1955.
Sea Chase, The (1953) - No Daydreaming Moored off a South Pacific island to collect wood to fuel their way to Chile, German steamer officers Kirchner and Schmidt (Lyle Bettger, John Qualen) are interrupted by captain Ehrlich (John Wayne), who has special instructions regarding their sexy spy passenger (Lana Turner), who is in turn impressed by his consideration for old soldier Schmidt (Paul Fix), in The Sea Chase, 1955.

Trailer

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Drama
Adventure
War
Adaptation
Release Date
Jun 4, 1955
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Honolulu, Hawaii, United States; Kona , Hawaii, United States; Hawaii, United States; Hawaii, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Sea Chase by Andrew Geer (New York, 1948).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 57m
Sound
4-Track Stereo (35 mm magnetic prints) (RCA Sound System), Mono (35 mm optical prints)
Color
Color (Warnercolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.55 : 1

Articles

The Sea Chase (1955)


John Wayne as a German sea captain and Lana Turner as a Nazi spy? That's the unlikely scenario for The Sea Chase (1955), an adaptation of the 1949 novel by Andrew Geer, directed by John Farrow.

Based on a true story, The Sea Chase stars Wayne as Capt. Karl Ehrlich, a German captain of an old steam freighter, who is in port in Sydney, Australia during the summer of 1939. A former naval officer who suffered repercussions for his anti-Hitler stance, Ehrlich sees that war is imminent and prefers to take the risk of sailing back to Germany, rather than be detained by the Allies. Along for the ride is an old friend, Britisher Jeff Napier (David Farrar) and his fiancée Elsa Keller (Turner). Just before the ship leaves, the German Consul-General asks Ehrlich to help one of their spies escape. The spy turns out to be Elsa Keller.

Filming began in September 1954, with the cast and crew going on location to the Big Island of Hawaii, where Warner Bros. had purchased an old freighter and sailed it to Kealakekua Bay. According to Tab Hunter, it took two-and-a-half hours by boat each day to reach the ship, which took up precious time in the shooting schedule. Although this was a Warner Bros. production, John Wayne was able to hire his friends, like character actor Paul Fix, cameraman William H. Clothier and rising star James Arness, who Wayne would soon convince to take the role of Matt Dillon on TV's Gunsmoke. Also in the cast was Claude Akins and future Gilligan's Island star, Alan Hale, Jr. Tab Hunter, who had just signed a long-term contract with Warner Bros., had been looking forward to the film, but was dismayed at his small part, and even more upset when his big scene with Lana Turner was later cut.

The making of The Sea Chase was a mixed bag for all concerned. For Wayne, it was the best of times and the worst of times. Just as location shooting finished, on November 1st, (coincidentally the day his contentious divorce with his ex-wife was settled), he married his girlfriend, Pilar, in Hawaii. The Hawaiian adventure may have ended happily, but it had not started out that way. Wayne, who had just finished filming the ill-fated The Conqueror (1956), went to Hawaii a few days early with Pilar and had gone skin diving. The result was a bad ear infection that plagued him for months. As Paul Fix later remembered, "He was in so much pain when filming began that he was on strong painkillers. You'd see this glazed look come over his eyes from the medication and his ear was so swollen that for several days John Farrow could only shoot him from his good side." At one point, production had to be halted for several days so Wayne could be flown to San Francisco to see a specialist.

A pain of a different sort was Lana Turner. According to Wayne, Turner "took an instant disliking to our director. And she didn't much like the rest of the cast. In fact, she didn't much like anything." After a few days of Turner showing up late and hung over or not showing up at all, John Farrow fired her. Devastated, Turner went to Wayne for help. He scolded her for her unprofessional behavior, which made her cry, but her tears earned his sympathy. Wayne intervened on her behalf with Farrow and Turner was back on the picture. While she was grateful to Wayne, she was still highly insecure. Turner would insist that Wayne not touch her hair or smudge her makeup during their love scenes, which caused the puzzled Wayne to ask, "How am I supposed to make love to a woman who won't let me touch her?"

One member of the cast who remembered the experience in a brighter light was James Arness, who enjoyed working with his friends, going surfing with Claude Akins at White Sands Beach, and acting with Lana Turner, who he called "beautiful and very friendly with all of us. The movie was completed on schedule, without a hitch." Tab Hunter also remembered Turner fondly, "She was tiny but every inch the radiant movie star." When Hunter, then only 23, blurted out that he had been a fan of Turner's since he was a kid, Turner responded by sitting in his lap and smiling provocatively at him. Hunter, who is gay, admitted that he turned red and "didn't know what to do with [his] hands."

The critics didn't seem to know what to do with The Sea Chase when it was released in June, 1955. Bosley Crowther, writing for The New York Times lamented that it "might have been a tremendous movie--a genuine saga of Nazi arrogance on the sea--if producer-director John Farrow had stuck faithfully to Andrew Geer's book." Wayne fared no better, coming in for Crowther's criticism for acting "as though he were heading a herd of cattle up the old Chisholm Trail."

The Sea Chase may not have been a box-office hit, but John Wayne needn't have worried; he continued to make at least a film a year for the next two decades. James Arness would soon be Matt Dillon on TV for twenty years and Tab Hunter was on the verge of being a major heart-throb.

By Lorraine LoBianco

SOURCES: Arness, James, Reynolds, Burt, Wise, Jr., James E. James Arness: An Autobiography Crowther, Bosley " 'The Sea Chase'; John Wayne Stars at the Paramount" The New York Times 11 Jun 55 Cusic, Don The Cowboy in Country Music: An Historical Survey with Artist Profiles David, Ronald L. Duke: The Life and Image of John Wayne Hunter, Tab, Muller, Eddie Tab Hunter Confidential: The Making of a Movie Star The Internet Movie Database Munn, Michael John Wayne: The Man Behind the Myth Roberts, Randy W., Olson, James Stuart John Wayne: American
The Sea Chase (1955)

The Sea Chase (1955)

John Wayne as a German sea captain and Lana Turner as a Nazi spy? That's the unlikely scenario for The Sea Chase (1955), an adaptation of the 1949 novel by Andrew Geer, directed by John Farrow. Based on a true story, The Sea Chase stars Wayne as Capt. Karl Ehrlich, a German captain of an old steam freighter, who is in port in Sydney, Australia during the summer of 1939. A former naval officer who suffered repercussions for his anti-Hitler stance, Ehrlich sees that war is imminent and prefers to take the risk of sailing back to Germany, rather than be detained by the Allies. Along for the ride is an old friend, Britisher Jeff Napier (David Farrar) and his fiancée Elsa Keller (Turner). Just before the ship leaves, the German Consul-General asks Ehrlich to help one of their spies escape. The spy turns out to be Elsa Keller. Filming began in September 1954, with the cast and crew going on location to the Big Island of Hawaii, where Warner Bros. had purchased an old freighter and sailed it to Kealakekua Bay. According to Tab Hunter, it took two-and-a-half hours by boat each day to reach the ship, which took up precious time in the shooting schedule. Although this was a Warner Bros. production, John Wayne was able to hire his friends, like character actor Paul Fix, cameraman William H. Clothier and rising star James Arness, who Wayne would soon convince to take the role of Matt Dillon on TV's Gunsmoke. Also in the cast was Claude Akins and future Gilligan's Island star, Alan Hale, Jr. Tab Hunter, who had just signed a long-term contract with Warner Bros., had been looking forward to the film, but was dismayed at his small part, and even more upset when his big scene with Lana Turner was later cut. The making of The Sea Chase was a mixed bag for all concerned. For Wayne, it was the best of times and the worst of times. Just as location shooting finished, on November 1st, (coincidentally the day his contentious divorce with his ex-wife was settled), he married his girlfriend, Pilar, in Hawaii. The Hawaiian adventure may have ended happily, but it had not started out that way. Wayne, who had just finished filming the ill-fated The Conqueror (1956), went to Hawaii a few days early with Pilar and had gone skin diving. The result was a bad ear infection that plagued him for months. As Paul Fix later remembered, "He was in so much pain when filming began that he was on strong painkillers. You'd see this glazed look come over his eyes from the medication and his ear was so swollen that for several days John Farrow could only shoot him from his good side." At one point, production had to be halted for several days so Wayne could be flown to San Francisco to see a specialist. A pain of a different sort was Lana Turner. According to Wayne, Turner "took an instant disliking to our director. And she didn't much like the rest of the cast. In fact, she didn't much like anything." After a few days of Turner showing up late and hung over or not showing up at all, John Farrow fired her. Devastated, Turner went to Wayne for help. He scolded her for her unprofessional behavior, which made her cry, but her tears earned his sympathy. Wayne intervened on her behalf with Farrow and Turner was back on the picture. While she was grateful to Wayne, she was still highly insecure. Turner would insist that Wayne not touch her hair or smudge her makeup during their love scenes, which caused the puzzled Wayne to ask, "How am I supposed to make love to a woman who won't let me touch her?" One member of the cast who remembered the experience in a brighter light was James Arness, who enjoyed working with his friends, going surfing with Claude Akins at White Sands Beach, and acting with Lana Turner, who he called "beautiful and very friendly with all of us. The movie was completed on schedule, without a hitch." Tab Hunter also remembered Turner fondly, "She was tiny but every inch the radiant movie star." When Hunter, then only 23, blurted out that he had been a fan of Turner's since he was a kid, Turner responded by sitting in his lap and smiling provocatively at him. Hunter, who is gay, admitted that he turned red and "didn't know what to do with [his] hands." The critics didn't seem to know what to do with The Sea Chase when it was released in June, 1955. Bosley Crowther, writing for The New York Times lamented that it "might have been a tremendous movie--a genuine saga of Nazi arrogance on the sea--if producer-director John Farrow had stuck faithfully to Andrew Geer's book." Wayne fared no better, coming in for Crowther's criticism for acting "as though he were heading a herd of cattle up the old Chisholm Trail." The Sea Chase may not have been a box-office hit, but John Wayne needn't have worried; he continued to make at least a film a year for the next two decades. James Arness would soon be Matt Dillon on TV for twenty years and Tab Hunter was on the verge of being a major heart-throb. By Lorraine LoBianco SOURCES: Arness, James, Reynolds, Burt, Wise, Jr., James E. James Arness: An Autobiography Crowther, Bosley " 'The Sea Chase'; John Wayne Stars at the Paramount" The New York Times 11 Jun 55 Cusic, Don The Cowboy in Country Music: An Historical Survey with Artist Profiles David, Ronald L. Duke: The Life and Image of John Wayne Hunter, Tab, Muller, Eddie Tab Hunter Confidential: The Making of a Movie Star The Internet Movie Database Munn, Michael John Wayne: The Man Behind the Myth Roberts, Randy W., Olson, James Stuart John Wayne: American

John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection


The John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection - featuring five classic films from the larger-than-life American hero - will debut on DVD May 3 from Warner Home Video. All five titles in the Collection, including Blood Alley, McQ, The Sea Chase, Tall in the Saddle and The Train Robbers, will be available on DVD for the first time.

Born Marion Robert Morrison in Winterset, Iowa, John Wayne first worked in the film business as a laborer on the Fox lot during summer vacations from U.S.C., which he attended on a football scholarship. He met and was befriended by John Ford, a young director who was beginning to make a name for himself in action films, comedies and dramas. It was Ford who recommended Wayne to director Raoul Walsh for the male lead in the 1930 epic Western The Big Trail, and, although it was a box office failure, the movie showed Wayne's potential.

For the next nine years, Wayne worked in a multitude of B-Westerns and serials in between bit parts in larger features. Wayne's big break came in 1939, when Ford cast him as the Ringo Kid in the adventure Stagecoach. Wayne nearly stole the picture from his more seasoned co-stars, and his career as a box-office superstar began. During his 50 year film career, Wayne played the lead in 142 movies, an as yet unsurpassed record, and was nominated for three Academy Awards®, winning the Best Actor award in 1970 for his performance in True Grit.

Details of The John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection Films

Blood Alley (1955) - An American seafarer patrolling the South Seas is asked by the daughter of a missionary doctor killed by the Communists to help transport the citizens of a small Chinese town to freedom in Hong Kong. This action-adventure based on A. S. Fleischman's novel, marks the first on-screen pairing of movie legends John Wayne and Lauren Bacall.

DVD special features include:

Newsreel footage
- The Hollywood Foreign Press Honors John Wayne
- Crusade for Freedom
- John Wayne and The Legion Poppy Sale (silent clip)
- Air Force Honors the Cast of Blood Alley
-1955 Promos on Blood Alley - Wayne discusses how he made it into the movies; "the monster" of movie land; the Mitchell BNC camera and his use of his home movie camera to capture scenes while on Blood Alley
- John Wayne trailer gallery

McQ (1974) - John Wayne forcefully enforces the law in this high-velocity thriller that's a revenge western set in the big city. Police Lieutenant Lon McQ (Wayne) investigates the killing of his best friend and uncovers corrupt elements of the police department dealing in confiscated drugs. Directed by John Sturges (Ice Station Zebra, The Magnificent Seven), McQ also stars Eddie Albert (Roman Holiday) and Colleen Dewhurst (Annie Hall, Dying Young).

DVD special features include:

- Featurette
- John Wayne trailer gallery

The Sea Chase (1955) - John Wayne and Lana Turner are a formidable romantic team in this harrowing adventure directed by Academy Award-nominee John Farrow (Wake Island). Sea captain Kal Erhlich (Wayne) is an anti-Nazi German freighter captain at the outset of World War II attempting to sail his ship from Australia to the North Sea rather than risk internment. Both Allied and German ships follow in pursuit, while Erhlich battles storms, sharks, and romances.

DVD special features include:

- John Wayne trailer gallery

Tall in the Saddle (1944) - In this fast-paced entertaining western, John Wayne stars as Rocklin, a cowboy who upon arriving at a ranch to work as a cowhand finds his employer was just murdered. Although he has no friends, and no money, Rocklin stays in town, intent on tracking the killers and uncovering a plan to inherit the dead employer's riches.

DVD special features include:

- John Wayne trailer gallery

The Train Robbers (1973) - The action never stops in this western starring John Wayne, Ann-Margret and Ricardo Montalban. A gunhand named Lane (Wayne) is hired by a widow, Mrs. Lowe (Ann-Margret), to find gold stolen by her husband so that she may return it and start fresh. However, once they cross the border into Mexico to recover the loot, they discover two very different pursuers: a large group of bandidos and a lone horseman (Montalban), both of whom know their every move.

DVD special features include:

Two featurettes
Working with a Western Legend - an inside look at Wayne with stuntmen Jerry Gatlin, Dean Smith and Terry Leonard
The Wayne Train
- John Wayne trailer gallery

John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection

The John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection - featuring five classic films from the larger-than-life American hero - will debut on DVD May 3 from Warner Home Video. All five titles in the Collection, including Blood Alley, McQ, The Sea Chase, Tall in the Saddle and The Train Robbers, will be available on DVD for the first time. Born Marion Robert Morrison in Winterset, Iowa, John Wayne first worked in the film business as a laborer on the Fox lot during summer vacations from U.S.C., which he attended on a football scholarship. He met and was befriended by John Ford, a young director who was beginning to make a name for himself in action films, comedies and dramas. It was Ford who recommended Wayne to director Raoul Walsh for the male lead in the 1930 epic Western The Big Trail, and, although it was a box office failure, the movie showed Wayne's potential. For the next nine years, Wayne worked in a multitude of B-Westerns and serials in between bit parts in larger features. Wayne's big break came in 1939, when Ford cast him as the Ringo Kid in the adventure Stagecoach. Wayne nearly stole the picture from his more seasoned co-stars, and his career as a box-office superstar began. During his 50 year film career, Wayne played the lead in 142 movies, an as yet unsurpassed record, and was nominated for three Academy Awards®, winning the Best Actor award in 1970 for his performance in True Grit. Details of The John Wayne Legendary Heroes Collection Films Blood Alley (1955) - An American seafarer patrolling the South Seas is asked by the daughter of a missionary doctor killed by the Communists to help transport the citizens of a small Chinese town to freedom in Hong Kong. This action-adventure based on A. S. Fleischman's novel, marks the first on-screen pairing of movie legends John Wayne and Lauren Bacall. DVD special features include: Newsreel footage - The Hollywood Foreign Press Honors John Wayne - Crusade for Freedom - John Wayne and The Legion Poppy Sale (silent clip) - Air Force Honors the Cast of Blood Alley -1955 Promos on Blood Alley - Wayne discusses how he made it into the movies; "the monster" of movie land; the Mitchell BNC camera and his use of his home movie camera to capture scenes while on Blood Alley - John Wayne trailer gallery McQ (1974) - John Wayne forcefully enforces the law in this high-velocity thriller that's a revenge western set in the big city. Police Lieutenant Lon McQ (Wayne) investigates the killing of his best friend and uncovers corrupt elements of the police department dealing in confiscated drugs. Directed by John Sturges (Ice Station Zebra, The Magnificent Seven), McQ also stars Eddie Albert (Roman Holiday) and Colleen Dewhurst (Annie Hall, Dying Young). DVD special features include: - Featurette - John Wayne trailer gallery The Sea Chase (1955) - John Wayne and Lana Turner are a formidable romantic team in this harrowing adventure directed by Academy Award-nominee John Farrow (Wake Island). Sea captain Kal Erhlich (Wayne) is an anti-Nazi German freighter captain at the outset of World War II attempting to sail his ship from Australia to the North Sea rather than risk internment. Both Allied and German ships follow in pursuit, while Erhlich battles storms, sharks, and romances. DVD special features include: - John Wayne trailer gallery Tall in the Saddle (1944) - In this fast-paced entertaining western, John Wayne stars as Rocklin, a cowboy who upon arriving at a ranch to work as a cowhand finds his employer was just murdered. Although he has no friends, and no money, Rocklin stays in town, intent on tracking the killers and uncovering a plan to inherit the dead employer's riches. DVD special features include: - John Wayne trailer gallery The Train Robbers (1973) - The action never stops in this western starring John Wayne, Ann-Margret and Ricardo Montalban. A gunhand named Lane (Wayne) is hired by a widow, Mrs. Lowe (Ann-Margret), to find gold stolen by her husband so that she may return it and start fresh. However, once they cross the border into Mexico to recover the loot, they discover two very different pursuers: a large group of bandidos and a lone horseman (Montalban), both of whom know their every move. DVD special features include: Two featurettes Working with a Western Legend - an inside look at Wayne with stuntmen Jerry Gatlin, Dean Smith and Terry Leonard The Wayne Train - John Wayne trailer gallery

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Voice-over narration by David Farrar as the character "Napier," and delivered in the style of a personal reminiscence, is heard intermittently throughout the film. At the end of the film, the fate of characters "Karl" and "Elsa" are left uncertain, and Farrar concludes by asking: "Had the sea taken them or had they reached the nearby shore, where the fjords could hide a secret?...Knowing Karl as I did, I have my own opinion." An acknowledgment at the end of the film expresses gratitude to the "people of the islands" and "the Royal Canadian Navy for their assistance in the making of the picture." Actor Claude Akins' onscreen credit reads "Claude Akin." Although the Caribbean and Mexican coastline were scouted as possible location sites for the shooting of The Sea Chase, the Motion Picture Herald review and Hollywood Reporter news items and production charts reported that portions of the film were shot around the Hawaiian Islands.
       Although he is not credited onscreen, Frank S. Nugent is listed on the CBCS and a June 1954 Hollywood Reporter news item as one of the film's screenwriters. Hollywood Reporter news items add Webb Overlander and Henri Letondal to the cast, but their appearance in the film has not been confirmed. An Hollywood Reporter news item also reported that Michael Pate was cast; however, he did not appear in the final film. M-G-M loaned Lana Turner to Warner Bros. for the production. The song she sang in the film, "Steh' Ich im Finster Mitternacht," also known as "Treue Liebe," was a German song given English words for The Sea Chase. According to Hollywood Reporter news items, John Wayne was hospitalized twice for an ear infection during filming, and actors Paul Fix and Luis Van Rooten suffered infections brought on by skin diving.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video July 25, 1990

Released in United States Summer June 1955

CinemaScope

Released in United States Summer June 1955

Released in United States on Video July 25, 1990