Gold Diggers of 1935


1h 35m 1935
Gold Diggers of 1935

Brief Synopsis

A socialite is bamboozled into producing a stage show in her home.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Musical
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Mar 16, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
First National Productions Corp.
Distribution Company
First National Pictures, Inc.; The Vitaphone Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Synopsis

The wealthy Mrs. Mathilda Prentiss, her sullen daughter Ann, and playboy son Humbolt are vacationing at a luxurious summer resort, where they are joined by Ann's fiancé, T. Mosley Thorpe, an eccentric, middle-aged millionaire who is writing a monograph on snuffboxes. Ann is getting no attention from Mosley and convinces her mother to hire Dick Curtis, the hotel's handsome and youthful desk clerk, to escort her for the summer. Dick hesitates, but his fiancée, Arlene Davis, encourages him to accept the job. With Dick's help, Ann buys a new wardrobe and jewels and gets a new coiffure, transforming herself into a lovely young woman. Meanwhile, Humbolt has discovered Arlene's charms, and Mrs. Prentiss has hired an impresario named Nicoleff to direct her annual charity show. The parsimonious Mrs. Prentiss wants to cut corners on the production, but Nicoleff, along with Schultz, his set decorator, Louis Lamson, the hotel manager, and Betty Hawes, the hotel stenographer, are plotting to make a big profit at the wealthy woman's expense. Betty, who has been taking dictation for Mosley, is also scheming to blackmail the befuddled writer, by suggesting he use her name in the lyrics for a love song. When she addresses a copy to herself, it reads like a proposal. By the time the show goes on, Ann and Dick are in love, Arlene has married Humbolt and Mrs. Prentiss discovers Mosley's entanglement with Betty, who is suing him for breach of promise. The lavish musical is a hit, but has cost Mrs. Prentiss a small fortune. Finally, Ann defies her mother and marries Dick.

Photo Collections

Gold Diggers of 1935 - Scene Stills
Here are several scene and publicity stills from the Warner Bros. musical Gold Diggers of 1935 (1935), all featuring chorus girls.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Musical
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Mar 16, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
First National Productions Corp.
Distribution Company
First National Pictures, Inc.; The Vitaphone Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Award Wins

Best Song

1935

Award Nominations

Best Dance Direction

1936
Busby Berkeley

Articles

Gold Diggers of 1935


Yes, there's a plot in Gold Diggers of 1935 (1935). But it doesn't distract from the visual spectacle served up by choreographer-director Busby Berkeley. The movie is really about style. From beautiful geometric-patterned marble floors to gilded elevator doors to extravagant musical fantasies where pianos can dance, Gold Diggers of 1935 shows off the clean, angular Art Deco fashion of the 1930's and 40's with panache. It's an art director's dream, Busby Berkeley-style.

The swank setting for Gold Diggers of 1935 is the Wentworth Plaza, a summer hotel for big tippers. Just ask the staff. There's quite a pecking order to determine who gets what cut of the gratuity pie. But everyone is determined to get their fair share, including medical student/desk clerk Dick Powell. So, when Powell is offered big bucks to entertain sheltered heiress Gloria Stuart for the season, it sounds like easy money. But Stuart has a special pact with her mother: one summer of fun and then she'll marry her fianc¿a stuffy snuffbox expert. As luck, and Hollywood, would have it, Powell and Stuart fall in love and collaborate on a musical revue. Enter Adolphe Menjou as a Russian dance director, who helps orchestrate the couple's romance and the show's production.

And that's where the real story begins - with Berkeley. Gold Diggers of 1935 marked the choreographer's debut as a solo director. He had, of course, directed the dance numbers in many earlier films, including 42nd Street and Gold Diggers of 1933 (both 1933) and received co-directing credit for She Had to Say Yes (1933) with George J. Amy. But Gold Diggers of 1935 would be Berkeley's first film with almost total creative control. And the results are unforgettable. With only three songs, Lullaby of Broadway, I'm Going Shopping With You and The Words Are In My Heart, Berkeley extends the limited production numbers to dramatic effect.

Most visually stunning is the white piano number of The Words Are In My Heart, where fifty-six grand pianos come to life in a deco kaleidoscope. And for Berkeley, the creative impetus for the scene lived for years in his head before it danced on screen. As Berkeley recalled, "one day in New York I was watching an act at the Palace with four men playing grand pianos. I thought to myself then, 'someday I'll do that with fifty pianos,' and when it came time to think of something for this song, the thought came to mind." If you look very carefully, you'll realize how Berkeley pulled this trick off. Under each of the light, specially designed piano shells, was a dancer, wearing black pants and staying in step to black tape marks on the glossy floor. But it's doubtful many viewers noticed. Even after you're let in on the secret, the dance still mesmerizes.

The other pure Berkeley number in Gold Diggers of 1935 is probably among the best remembered sequences of his career – the show stopping finale Lullaby of Broadway. The sequence, which turned out to be a favorite of Berkeley's, was a difficult one to conceive. After composer Harry Warren wrote the tune, and lyricist Al Dubin added the words, telling the story of a Broadway Baby who plays all night and sleeps all day, Berkeley knew immediately how he wanted to stage the main part of the number but was at a loss to find a perfect opening. It took a little friendly competition from Al Jolson for Berkeley to find his inspiration. Jolson had heard Lullaby of Broadway and wanted it for his next movie. Finally, Berkeley agreed that if he didn't find a way to open the number in 24 hours, Jolson could have it. Obviously, inspiration struck; Berkeley opened with singer Wini Shaw's face on a black background.

The fantasy film within a film, which featured over a hundred dancers, provided an unusual, but dramatic, ending to Gold Diggers of 1935 and earned Busby Berkeley an Oscar nomination for Best Dance Direction. The number was also a winner for Warren and Dubin, who received an Academy Award for Best Song. The segment ranks right up there with Berkeley’s best. As the New York Times film critic said of Gold Diggers of 1935, the "master of scenic prestidigitation continues to dazzle the eye and storm the imagination."

And here's an interesting product placement trivia bit: Buick had a 10 picture deal with Warner Brothers; in exchange for being able to associate themselves with Warner Brothers' films, Buick provided the cars to be used as props in the films. Gold Diggers of 1935 is a prime example. Another company with a long- term agreement with Warner Brothers was General Electric - specifically they were trying to promote a new kind of refrigerator. As a result, you often see a kind of refrigerator used in Warner films that wasn't yet widely used by the public.

Producer: Robert Lord
Director: Busby Berkeley
Screenplay: Peter Milne, Manuel Seff, Robert Lord
Art Direction: Anton Grot
Cinematography: George Barnes
Editing: George J. Amy
Music: Al Dubin, Harry Warren
Cast: Dick Powell (Dick Curtis), Gloria Stuart (Amy Prentiss), Adolphe Menjou (Nicoleff), Glenda Farrell (Betty Hawes), Grant Mitchell (Louis Lamson), Frank McHugh (Humbolt Prentiss),Joseph Cawthorn (August Schultz).
BW-95m. Closed captioning.

by Stephanie Thames
Gold Diggers Of 1935

Gold Diggers of 1935

Yes, there's a plot in Gold Diggers of 1935 (1935). But it doesn't distract from the visual spectacle served up by choreographer-director Busby Berkeley. The movie is really about style. From beautiful geometric-patterned marble floors to gilded elevator doors to extravagant musical fantasies where pianos can dance, Gold Diggers of 1935 shows off the clean, angular Art Deco fashion of the 1930's and 40's with panache. It's an art director's dream, Busby Berkeley-style. The swank setting for Gold Diggers of 1935 is the Wentworth Plaza, a summer hotel for big tippers. Just ask the staff. There's quite a pecking order to determine who gets what cut of the gratuity pie. But everyone is determined to get their fair share, including medical student/desk clerk Dick Powell. So, when Powell is offered big bucks to entertain sheltered heiress Gloria Stuart for the season, it sounds like easy money. But Stuart has a special pact with her mother: one summer of fun and then she'll marry her fianc¿a stuffy snuffbox expert. As luck, and Hollywood, would have it, Powell and Stuart fall in love and collaborate on a musical revue. Enter Adolphe Menjou as a Russian dance director, who helps orchestrate the couple's romance and the show's production. And that's where the real story begins - with Berkeley. Gold Diggers of 1935 marked the choreographer's debut as a solo director. He had, of course, directed the dance numbers in many earlier films, including 42nd Street and Gold Diggers of 1933 (both 1933) and received co-directing credit for She Had to Say Yes (1933) with George J. Amy. But Gold Diggers of 1935 would be Berkeley's first film with almost total creative control. And the results are unforgettable. With only three songs, Lullaby of Broadway, I'm Going Shopping With You and The Words Are In My Heart, Berkeley extends the limited production numbers to dramatic effect. Most visually stunning is the white piano number of The Words Are In My Heart, where fifty-six grand pianos come to life in a deco kaleidoscope. And for Berkeley, the creative impetus for the scene lived for years in his head before it danced on screen. As Berkeley recalled, "one day in New York I was watching an act at the Palace with four men playing grand pianos. I thought to myself then, 'someday I'll do that with fifty pianos,' and when it came time to think of something for this song, the thought came to mind." If you look very carefully, you'll realize how Berkeley pulled this trick off. Under each of the light, specially designed piano shells, was a dancer, wearing black pants and staying in step to black tape marks on the glossy floor. But it's doubtful many viewers noticed. Even after you're let in on the secret, the dance still mesmerizes. The other pure Berkeley number in Gold Diggers of 1935 is probably among the best remembered sequences of his career – the show stopping finale Lullaby of Broadway. The sequence, which turned out to be a favorite of Berkeley's, was a difficult one to conceive. After composer Harry Warren wrote the tune, and lyricist Al Dubin added the words, telling the story of a Broadway Baby who plays all night and sleeps all day, Berkeley knew immediately how he wanted to stage the main part of the number but was at a loss to find a perfect opening. It took a little friendly competition from Al Jolson for Berkeley to find his inspiration. Jolson had heard Lullaby of Broadway and wanted it for his next movie. Finally, Berkeley agreed that if he didn't find a way to open the number in 24 hours, Jolson could have it. Obviously, inspiration struck; Berkeley opened with singer Wini Shaw's face on a black background. The fantasy film within a film, which featured over a hundred dancers, provided an unusual, but dramatic, ending to Gold Diggers of 1935 and earned Busby Berkeley an Oscar nomination for Best Dance Direction. The number was also a winner for Warren and Dubin, who received an Academy Award for Best Song. The segment ranks right up there with Berkeley’s best. As the New York Times film critic said of Gold Diggers of 1935, the "master of scenic prestidigitation continues to dazzle the eye and storm the imagination." And here's an interesting product placement trivia bit: Buick had a 10 picture deal with Warner Brothers; in exchange for being able to associate themselves with Warner Brothers' films, Buick provided the cars to be used as props in the films. Gold Diggers of 1935 is a prime example. Another company with a long- term agreement with Warner Brothers was General Electric - specifically they were trying to promote a new kind of refrigerator. As a result, you often see a kind of refrigerator used in Warner films that wasn't yet widely used by the public. Producer: Robert Lord Director: Busby Berkeley Screenplay: Peter Milne, Manuel Seff, Robert Lord Art Direction: Anton Grot Cinematography: George Barnes Editing: George J. Amy Music: Al Dubin, Harry Warren Cast: Dick Powell (Dick Curtis), Gloria Stuart (Amy Prentiss), Adolphe Menjou (Nicoleff), Glenda Farrell (Betty Hawes), Grant Mitchell (Louis Lamson), Frank McHugh (Humbolt Prentiss),Joseph Cawthorn (August Schultz). BW-95m. Closed captioning. by Stephanie Thames

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

A news item in Daily Variety notes that Jack Grieves, a twenty-six year old dancer in the chorus, died on the set from acute indigestion. A news item in Hollywood Reporter notes that Rosita, formerly of the dance team Ramon and Rosita, applied for an injunction against Warner Bros. because although she did not appear in the film, she was billed as dancing with Ramon. According to modern sources, fifty-six pianos were used in "The Words Are in My Heart" number. To create their movement, stagehands dressed in black were under each piano. "Lullaby of Broadway" won the Academy Award for Best Song of the year. For more information on Warner Bros.' "Gold Diggers" films see the entry below for Gold Diggers of 1933.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1935

Released in United States 1935