We Who Are Young


1h 19m 1940
We Who Are Young

Brief Synopsis

A man violates company policy by getting married.

Film Details

Also Known As
I Do, To Own the World
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Release Date
Jul 19, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 19m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

Margy White and William Brooks, two young office workers in a large accounting firm, secretly marry in defiance of the rules of the New York company where they are employed. After furnishing their flat on the installment plan, their dreams for a bright future are dimmed when C. B. Beamis, the small-minded office manager, discovers their marriage and fires Margy. Bill, hoping that the reorganization plan that he has submitted to Beamis will result in a substantial raise, keeps his spirits up and attempts to keep the household together on his meager salary. Bill's optimism is tested, however, when Beamis rejects his plan and Margy reveals she is pregnant. Desperate for money to pay the doctor's bills, Bill borrows from a loan shark, who attaches his pay-check when he is unable to meet his payments. When Beamis fires him for going into debt and he is unable to find another job, Bill stares destitution in the face. Humiliated after hocking Margy's engagement ring, having their furniture repossessed and being forced onto the welfare roles, Bill, in a final move of desperation, seizes a shovel and begins to dig on a construction site. After he is arrested for trespassing,the foreman, Tony, pleads his case to Braddock, the head of the company, who bails Bill out of jail and offers him a job. With hope at last, Bill reclaims his reorganization plan from Beamis and tells him off. Returning home to find Margy in labor, Bill is unable to summon an ambulance and frantically steals a car to drive her to the hospital. As Margy gives birth to twins, the car's owner dismisses charges against Bill, while Beamis, seeing the error of his ways, asks Bill to return to work.

Film Details

Also Known As
I Do, To Own the World
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Release Date
Jul 19, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 19m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

We Who Are Young -


We Who Are Young (1940) Studio heads of the late 1930s mostly concerned themselves with writers' storytelling skills, not their personal politics. Yet when asked to find evidence of leftist influence in Hollywood, researchers often cite screenwriter Dalton Trumbo's uplifting personal drama about a young couple struggling against financial problems. Margy and William Brooks (Lana Turner & John Shelton) have married against the policy of the company where they both work; when they're discovered she is fired. John's single salary isn't enough, especially after his company reorganization plan is rejected, nixing chances of a promotion. With Margy now pregnant John foolishly borrows from a loan shark. When his debt is discovered he forfeits his job, the furniture is repossessed and they're forced to pawn Margy's engagement ring. Idle and frustrated, John is arrested for trespassing at a construction site. He then steals a car to rush Margy to the maternity hospital. An atypical MGM film concerned with the problems of the disadvantaged, We Who Are Young was a change of pace for its star Lana Turner, away from her 'tight sweater' image. The contrived screenplay is a thematic update on King Vidor's the silent The Crowd, except that the same arbitrary forces that darken the Brooks' future, regroup to produce an equally arbitrary happy ending. John's recovers mainly because he attracts the attention of an enlightened contractor, Braddock (Jonathan Hale). Dalton Trumbo's anti-capitalist dialogue has Braddock blame a greedy system for the troubles of honest workingmen. He also implies that in a more cooperative future, undefined new friends will help John, "people you've never heard of." Reclaiming his business plan, John lectures his old boss that "money isn't everything." Despite its forced conflicts and trite resolution, MGM's We Who Are Young was the beginning of Trumbo's most productive screenwriting period, that includes the popular successes Kitty Foyle, A Guy Named Joe and Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo.

By Glenn Erickson
We Who Are Young -

We Who Are Young -

We Who Are Young (1940) Studio heads of the late 1930s mostly concerned themselves with writers' storytelling skills, not their personal politics. Yet when asked to find evidence of leftist influence in Hollywood, researchers often cite screenwriter Dalton Trumbo's uplifting personal drama about a young couple struggling against financial problems. Margy and William Brooks (Lana Turner & John Shelton) have married against the policy of the company where they both work; when they're discovered she is fired. John's single salary isn't enough, especially after his company reorganization plan is rejected, nixing chances of a promotion. With Margy now pregnant John foolishly borrows from a loan shark. When his debt is discovered he forfeits his job, the furniture is repossessed and they're forced to pawn Margy's engagement ring. Idle and frustrated, John is arrested for trespassing at a construction site. He then steals a car to rush Margy to the maternity hospital. An atypical MGM film concerned with the problems of the disadvantaged, We Who Are Young was a change of pace for its star Lana Turner, away from her 'tight sweater' image. The contrived screenplay is a thematic update on King Vidor's the silent The Crowd, except that the same arbitrary forces that darken the Brooks' future, regroup to produce an equally arbitrary happy ending. John's recovers mainly because he attracts the attention of an enlightened contractor, Braddock (Jonathan Hale). Dalton Trumbo's anti-capitalist dialogue has Braddock blame a greedy system for the troubles of honest workingmen. He also implies that in a more cooperative future, undefined new friends will help John, "people you've never heard of." Reclaiming his business plan, John lectures his old boss that "money isn't everything." Despite its forced conflicts and trite resolution, MGM's We Who Are Young was the beginning of Trumbo's most productive screenwriting period, that includes the popular successes Kitty Foyle, A Guy Named Joe and Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo. By Glenn Erickson

Quotes

Trivia

Cinematographer John F. Seitz took over as director of photography when Karl Freund fell ill.

Notes

The working titles of this film were I Do and To Own the World. According to a news item in Hollywood Reporter, photographer John Seitz substituted for Karl Freund when Freund fell ill. This picture marked the American debut of European producer Seymour Nebenzahl, the producer of M and Mayerling.