Tension at Table Rock


1h 33m 1956
Tension at Table Rock

Brief Synopsis

When the owner of a stagecoach station is killed, a gunman takes his place.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Western
Release Date
Oct 1956
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Mojave Desert, California, United States; Newhall--Circle J Guest Ranch, California, United States; Newhall--Circle J Ranch, California, United States; Red Rock Canyon, California, United States; Red Rock Canyon, Nevada, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Bitter Sage by Frank Gruber (New York, 1954).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

As a posse tracks an outlaw trio headed by Sam Older, who is known for giving the spoils of his robberies to the poor, Sam kills one of his wounded compatriots and races home with the other, his best friend, Wes Tancred. There, Wes spurns the attentions of Sam's wife Cathy, and announces that although he originally admired Sam, he has been steadily disillusioned by Sam's self-glorification and veiled viciousness, exemplified by his most recent murder. Sam, jealous of Cathy's attentions and certain that Wes will turn him in for the $10,000 reward, reaches for his gun when Wes turns his back, but Wes outdraws him. Just then, the posse arrives, and Cathy spitefully announces that Wes killed Sam without provocation. Wes is jailed, and although he receives a full pardon, is universally ostracized as a coward who killed a hero and his best friend. After traveling for days he arrives at a small town, where the citizens, upon learning his name, taunt him by singing a ballad about his guilt and then beat him up. He travels on alone, finally reaching a makeshift farm and stagecoach stop run by the crippled Ed Burrows and his young son Jody. Wes introduces himself as "John Bailey" and discourages any questions about his past, especially after Jody sings the ballad. Despite Wes's reticence, Ed kindly offers him a job as a horse wrangler, and within days, Jody has grown to idolize Wes. One day, three bandits ride up, planning to rob the stage when it arrives. While they force Ed to cook them dinner, Jody informs Wes in secret that they have a rifle hidden in the bedroom. Although Wes advises Ed not to fight, when the stage approaches, Ed pulls out his gun and is shot down. Wes dives for the gun and rapidly kills all three bandits as Jody kneels by his father's lifeless body. Wes refuses the subsequent reward, instead escorting Jody to the nearby town of Table Rock, where Ed's brother-in-law, Fred Miller, is the sheriff. There, Fred, who bears both the physical and psychological scars of a brutal beating, is worried about the upcoming arrival of violent trail herders, who invade Table Rock each year and vandalize the town. Fred and his wife Lorna welcome Jody and press Wes to stay, but he insists on traveling on. Jody follows him onto the trail, however, and Wes is forced to take him home. Over a drink, Fred reveals that he needs a deputy to help defend the town, and although Wes declines the job, he accepts Lorna's plea to stay until Jody is settled. The herders, led by Hampton, enter the area the next day. Svenson Brink, whose farm has been trampled before by the herd, guards his fence with a rifle, but is ignored by the herders. He then confronts Fred about enforcing the law, but Fred merely asks Hampton to stay out of town. Hampton argues that the boys need to amuse themselves, but agrees to have trail boss Cord control them while they are in Table Rock. Meanwhile, both Jody and Lorna wish that Wes would stay, but he plans to leave soon. At Wes's suggestion, the three ask newspaperman Harry Jameson to give Jody a job, and although the editor considers Fred a coward, he hires Jody. As the herders enter town, Lorna refuses to clear the streets, as do the rest of the citizens, but Fred insists that she go home. There, she reveals Fred's beating to Wes, who states that Fred must work things out by himself. That night, the herders, who have been warned not to make trouble, grow restless. One, Lerner, is thrown out of the saloon, which Wes also leaves to escape the sound of the ballad. Lerner immediately provokes Brink, and as Fred and Wes watch from across the street, the cowhand shoots Brink, then places his pistol in the dead man's hand. Fred arrests Lerner, but when the herders threaten him, he says that the killing was in self-defense. Later, Lorna chastises Fred and pleads with him to leave town, but he refuses to return to the impoverished life of a farmer, even though he realizes that he is an inadequate sheriff. Soon, Lerner is released and, upon seeing Jameson's editorial naming him as a killer, attacks the newspaper office. Wes arrives in time to save Jameson and Jody, whose arm is broken in the assault. At the Millers', Lorna thanks Wes and, not realizing that Fred has returned and is listening, expresses her admiration for his strong character. Lerner's trial soon begins, during which Fred testifies that Lerner shot in self-defense. At the last moment, however, Wes reveals that he saw Lerner kill Brink, then warns Fred that if he continues to lie he will never be able to escape himself. Wes confesses his true name, knowing this will cast doubt on his testimony and force Fred, now the only credible witness, finally to admit that he saw the murder. As everyone shakes Fred's hand, Wes walks out alone, but is pleased when Jody follows and declares his ongoing faith in him. Soon after, saloon owner Kirk, who has been secretly backing the herders, sends for hired gun Jim Breck. Meanwhile, the townspeople ostracize Wes, and when he asks Jameson about Lorna, the editor accuses him of staying in town only to steal Fred's wife. Wes later spots Breck, an old friend, and upon learning that Breck was hired to kill Fred, is forced to challenge him to a duel to protect the Millers. In the street, Fred, Lorna and Jody approach just as Wes outdraws Breck. While Wes stands over his friend's body, Fred spies Kirk aim a gun at Wes, and shoots the saloon owner. Just then, the herders enter town planning to break Lerner out of jail. Fred, finally cured of his fear, confronts them, and although they assume they outnumber him, they soon realize that the armed townsmen surround them. Hampton leads his men out of town, after which the citizens congratulate Fred. He tries to thank Wes, who explains that he must leave, even after Jameson apologetically asks him to stay. After saying goodbye to Lorna and Jody, Wes rides off alone.

Cast

Richard Egan

Wes Tancred, also known as John Bailey

Dorothy Malone

Lorna Miller

Cameron Mitchell

Sheriff Fred Miller

Billy Chapin

Jody Burrows

Royal Dano

Harry Jameson

Edward Andrews

Kirk

John Dehner

Hampton

Deforest Kelley

Jim Breck

Joe Desantis

Editor Burrows

Angie Dickinson

Cathy

James Anderson

Lerner

Joel Ashley

Svenson Brink

J. Doyle Brooks

Trail herder

Bill Hale

Trail herder

Al Cavens

Trail herder

Leo Mcmahon

Trail herder

Tom Mcdonough

Trail herder

Frosty Royce

Trail herder

Alex Sharp

Trail herder

Duncan Macdonnell

Trail herder

George Ross

Trail herder

Wes Hudman

Trail herder

Mason Curry

Keller

Charles [h.] Gray

Zecca

Adam Kennedy

Jethro

John Pickard

Cord

Rhodes Reason

Baid

Paul Richards

Sam Older

Duane Thorsen

Bill

Bill White Jr.

Benton

Phil Barnes

Bartender

Robert Forrest

Bartender

Ralph Volkie

Bartender

Gregg Barton

Striker

Lauren Chapin

Singer

Joyce Jameson

Singer

Maria Monay

Brunette singer

Jeanne Bates

Mrs. Brice

Wes Chistensen

Townsman

Rex Lease

Townsman

William Fawcett

Townsman

Richard Gildon

Townsman

Pierce Lyden

Townsman

Gordon Clark

Piano player

Jack Lomas

Piano player

Peggy Creel

House girl

Pearl Mcneil

House girl

Howard Culver

Clerk

Roy Darmour

Reporter

Herb Lytton

Reporter

Joey Ray

Reporter

Britt Wood

Harmonica player

Dabbs Greer

Doctor

Jester Hairston

Janitor

Bill Hale

Guitar player

Ed Hinton

Hank

Paul Keast

Grocer

Harry Lauter

Stagecoach guard

John G. Lee

Arndt

Frank Marlowe

Ruffian

Dub Taylor

Ruffian

Mort Mills

Bren

Grandon Rhodes

Judge

Dorothy Schuyler

Girl with Wes

Fred Dale

Bill Hamel

Joe Scudero

Felice Richmond

Anne Warren

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Western
Release Date
Oct 1956
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Mojave Desert, California, United States; Newhall--Circle J Guest Ranch, California, United States; Newhall--Circle J Ranch, California, United States; Red Rock Canyon, California, United States; Red Rock Canyon, Nevada, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Bitter Sage by Frank Gruber (New York, 1954).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

Tension at Table Rock - Tension at Table Rock


He's a man who's been wrongly accused in a shooting and had a slanderous song written about him, featuring his name in the chorus. Wouldn't you be tempted to find a new moniker? Well, in Tension at Table Rock (1956), Wes Tancred (Richard Egan) does. And it gives him some peace - for a while. The film is partly about the typical things that occur in Westerns - gunslingers that run amuck in a God-fearing town, frontier wives whose heads are turned by strong, silent strangers, the hardships of life on the range. But it's also about the courage it takes to face the past, about heroes who aren't so heroic and about cowards who turn out to be heroes.

At the film's open, Tancred hits the road trying to escape the infamy that a defensive and officially pardoned killing of a one-time friend brings him. He soon finds himself in a Wells Fargo outpost managed by a kindly man and his son. It is here that Tancred tries to lead a trouble-free existence under a new name and identity. But when a group of thugs tries to rob the coach, Tancred finds himself reluctantly prodded into action after the boy, Jody (Billy Chapin), is left an orphan. Jody's uncle (Cameron Mitchell) is sheriff of nearby Table Rock and Tancred takes him there, discovering that the sheriff is a man fighting private demons of his own. Complicating the situation is the sheriff's bombshell wife (Dorothy Malone) who'd make any man nervous. Turns out that the sheriff took a hell of a beating some years back and never really got over it. His wife has stuck with him through thick and thin, but when she lays eyes on Tancred, the storm clouds start to gather.

Richard Egan was not only a hunk of a leading man; he was also quite the academician. A high-ranking officer in WWII, he earned a graduate degree from Stanford and attended and taught at Northwestern University as well. But he left it all behind and headed to Hollywood where his athletic physique made him a natural action-adventure actor. He isn't, however, known for his comic timing or high-energy screen presence, so Egan's film career was restricted to certain types of movies. He followed Tension at Table Rock with Love Me Tender (1956) and went on to play more cowboys, soldiers, and similar heroic figures. He also played the lead in the television series Empire (1962-1964).

As the sheriff's wife and Tancred's catnip, Dorothy Malone went from model, to ingenue, to leading actress and did ultimately manage to get some well-deserved and remembered roles like an Oscar®-winning performance in Written on the Wind (1956), Man of a Thousand Faces (1957) and the television soap opera Peyton Place (1964-1968). The sheriff, Cameron Mitchell, like Egan, was a multi-purpose leading man but had an equally successful stage career, well-known for his role as Happy in Death of a Salesman, which he reprised in the screen version in 1951. His film and television career was impressively long and prolific, though he may be best remembered as Buck Cannon in the series High Chaparral. Billy Chapin ( The Night of the Hunter, 1955) delivers a solid performance as the boy who believes the popular lies about Tancred, but is willing to learn the truth when he discovers his new friend is none other than the "black-hearted, white-livered, back-biting, sidewinder" whose song he once loved to sing.

Tension at Table Rock has its share of notable cameos as well. Angie Dickinson appears at the film's open as the gal who starts all the trouble by throwing herself at a disinterested Tancred. When her jealous husband tries to shoot Tancred in the back but ends up dead instead, she tells the lie that spawns the rumor - that Tancred shot his best friend in the back. And though you'll have to hold out till the film's end to see him, DeForest Kelley (Dr. Bones) is worth the wait as a hired assassin and old friend of Tancred's, who shows up for a showdown with the sheriff.

Producer: Sam Wiesenthal
Director: Charles Marquis Warren
Screenplay: Winston Miller, based on a novel by Frank Gruber
Art Direction: Albert S. D'Agostino, John Mansbridge
Cinematography: Joseph F. Biroc
Editing: Dean Harrison, Harry Marker
Music: Josef Myrow, Dimitri Tiomkin, Ned Washington, Robert Wells
Cast: Richard Egan (Wes Tancred), Dorothy Malone (Lorna), Cameron Mitchell (Sheriff Miller), Billy Chapin (Jody), Royal Dano (Harry Jameson), Edward Andrews (Kirk), John Dehner (Hampton), DeForest Kelly (Jim Breck), Angie Dickinson (Cathy).
C-94m. Closed captioning.

by Emily Soares
Tension At  Table Rock - Tension At Table Rock

Tension at Table Rock - Tension at Table Rock

He's a man who's been wrongly accused in a shooting and had a slanderous song written about him, featuring his name in the chorus. Wouldn't you be tempted to find a new moniker? Well, in Tension at Table Rock (1956), Wes Tancred (Richard Egan) does. And it gives him some peace - for a while. The film is partly about the typical things that occur in Westerns - gunslingers that run amuck in a God-fearing town, frontier wives whose heads are turned by strong, silent strangers, the hardships of life on the range. But it's also about the courage it takes to face the past, about heroes who aren't so heroic and about cowards who turn out to be heroes. At the film's open, Tancred hits the road trying to escape the infamy that a defensive and officially pardoned killing of a one-time friend brings him. He soon finds himself in a Wells Fargo outpost managed by a kindly man and his son. It is here that Tancred tries to lead a trouble-free existence under a new name and identity. But when a group of thugs tries to rob the coach, Tancred finds himself reluctantly prodded into action after the boy, Jody (Billy Chapin), is left an orphan. Jody's uncle (Cameron Mitchell) is sheriff of nearby Table Rock and Tancred takes him there, discovering that the sheriff is a man fighting private demons of his own. Complicating the situation is the sheriff's bombshell wife (Dorothy Malone) who'd make any man nervous. Turns out that the sheriff took a hell of a beating some years back and never really got over it. His wife has stuck with him through thick and thin, but when she lays eyes on Tancred, the storm clouds start to gather. Richard Egan was not only a hunk of a leading man; he was also quite the academician. A high-ranking officer in WWII, he earned a graduate degree from Stanford and attended and taught at Northwestern University as well. But he left it all behind and headed to Hollywood where his athletic physique made him a natural action-adventure actor. He isn't, however, known for his comic timing or high-energy screen presence, so Egan's film career was restricted to certain types of movies. He followed Tension at Table Rock with Love Me Tender (1956) and went on to play more cowboys, soldiers, and similar heroic figures. He also played the lead in the television series Empire (1962-1964). As the sheriff's wife and Tancred's catnip, Dorothy Malone went from model, to ingenue, to leading actress and did ultimately manage to get some well-deserved and remembered roles like an Oscar®-winning performance in Written on the Wind (1956), Man of a Thousand Faces (1957) and the television soap opera Peyton Place (1964-1968). The sheriff, Cameron Mitchell, like Egan, was a multi-purpose leading man but had an equally successful stage career, well-known for his role as Happy in Death of a Salesman, which he reprised in the screen version in 1951. His film and television career was impressively long and prolific, though he may be best remembered as Buck Cannon in the series High Chaparral. Billy Chapin ( The Night of the Hunter, 1955) delivers a solid performance as the boy who believes the popular lies about Tancred, but is willing to learn the truth when he discovers his new friend is none other than the "black-hearted, white-livered, back-biting, sidewinder" whose song he once loved to sing. Tension at Table Rock has its share of notable cameos as well. Angie Dickinson appears at the film's open as the gal who starts all the trouble by throwing herself at a disinterested Tancred. When her jealous husband tries to shoot Tancred in the back but ends up dead instead, she tells the lie that spawns the rumor - that Tancred shot his best friend in the back. And though you'll have to hold out till the film's end to see him, DeForest Kelley (Dr. Bones) is worth the wait as a hired assassin and old friend of Tancred's, who shows up for a showdown with the sheriff. Producer: Sam Wiesenthal Director: Charles Marquis Warren Screenplay: Winston Miller, based on a novel by Frank Gruber Art Direction: Albert S. D'Agostino, John Mansbridge Cinematography: Joseph F. Biroc Editing: Dean Harrison, Harry Marker Music: Josef Myrow, Dimitri Tiomkin, Ned Washington, Robert Wells Cast: Richard Egan (Wes Tancred), Dorothy Malone (Lorna), Cameron Mitchell (Sheriff Miller), Billy Chapin (Jody), Royal Dano (Harry Jameson), Edward Andrews (Kirk), John Dehner (Hampton), DeForest Kelly (Jim Breck), Angie Dickinson (Cathy). C-94m. Closed captioning. by Emily Soares

Quotes

I was just telling Cathy I'm pulling out.
- Wes Tancred
Oh? Well, any particular reason, Wes?
- Sam Murdock
What happened to Ard out there?
- Wes Tancred
Oh, well, they'd have strung him up anyway, so I did him a favor.
- Sam Murdock
Well, I'm pulling out before you do me any favors.
- Wes Tancred

Trivia

Notes

As noted in a January 1954 Los Angeles Times news item, producer Sam Wiesenthal bought the rights to Frank Gruber's novel Bitter Sage for $75,000 just before its publication. At that point, Gregory Peck was considered to play "Wes Tancred." In December 1955, according to a Hollywood Reporter item, Wiesenthal joined RKO in order to produce Tension at Table Rock for the studio, and in January 1956 Hollywood Reporter reported that Wiesenthal had sold the novel rights to RKO in exchange for a percentage of the film's grosses.
       According to February 1956 Hollywood Reporter news items, Sterling Hayden was originally cast as "Fred Miller," and RKO considered Vince Edwards for a "starring role." RKO borrowed Cameron Mitchell from Twentieth Century-Fox to play Miller. A March 20, 1956 Hollywood Reporter article reported that James Anderson, who played "Lerner," broke his ankle during a fight scene and spent the rest of the production in a foot cast. February 1956 Hollywood Reporter news items stated that the film was shot partially on location in the Mojave Desert, the Circle J Ranch in Newhall, CA, and Red Rock Canyon, NV.