The Patriot


2h 38m 2000

Brief Synopsis

His son's murder by the British turns a colonial farmer into a rebel leader.

Film Details

Also Known As
Patriot, Patriot (Chemin de la liberte), The, Patriota, Patrioten, patriot: Le chemin de la liberté
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Historical
War
Biography
Period
Release Date
2000
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
South Carolina, USA; North Carolina, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 38m

Synopsis

A former hero of the French/Indian War, Benjamin Martin has renounced fighting forever to raise his family in peace. Although once a wily and ferocious soldier, he marries a fine woman who bears him seven children and, under her influence, trades his violent past for a peaceful future on his sprawling plantation. But rebellion is brewing--another conflict with Britain is inevitable. Recently widowed, his goals change. He's the sole caretaker of his brood, and the horrors of past combat haunt him still. Benjamin's eldest son, Gabriel, harbors no doubts about going to war: the radical speeches and newsletters that began in the cities and traverse the Colonies have made an impression on him. War is coming, and Gabriel feels the cause is just. In defiance of his father, he joins the fight. Benjamin is conflicted--as stalwart as he is in his opposition to the war, he believes in the cause. When the British arrive, the reluctant hero discovers that he must join the nation's war to protect his family.

Crew

Donald R Abblett

Other

Linda J Abblett

Other

David Accord

Sound

Michael Addabbo

Visual Effects

Lori Agostino

Visual Effects

Christian Ahlers

Visual Effects

Robert Albertell

Assistant Director

Eddie Alvarado

Other

Taylor Ammons

Production Coordinator

Kirsten Anderson

Accounting Assistant

Amy Andrews

Costumes

Amy Arnold

Costumes

Christopher Assells

Sound Effects Editor

James Auger

Visual Effects

Axel Bahro

Visual Effects

Jeanie Baker

Costumes

Karen M. Baker

Assistant Sound Editor

David Baldwin

Sound Effects Editor

Gina Baran

Hair Stylist

Pedro Barquin

Other

Stanton Barrett

Stunts

Andy Rafael Barrios

Visual Effects

Susanna Bauer

Visual Effects

Wendy Bell

Makeup Artist

Brian Bennett

Stunts

Paul F Bernard

Assistant Director

Kim Berner

Script Supervisor

Jan Bernotat

Motion Control

Rufus Best

Other

Judith H Bickerton

Hair Stylist

Ivica Bilich

Property Master

Bryan Birge

Costumes

Robert A. Blackburn

Construction Coordinator

Susie Blanchard

Other

Christopher Blauvelt

Camera Assistant

Dustin Blauvelt

Camera Operator

Joel Blauvelt

Video Assist/Playback

David Bloch

Casting

Bobby Blue

Visual Effects

Jennifer Bourne

Visual Effects

Bob Bowman

Assistant Sound Editor

Aaron Boyd

Assistant

Robert Boyd

Production Assistant

John Bozzalla

Production Assistant

Anita E Brabec

Makeup Artist

David Brenner

Editor

Brian Lee Brown

Stunts

Troy Brown

Stunts

Richard Brunton

On-Set Dresser

Clyde E Bryan

Assistant

Richard Bucher

Stunts

Tim Burgard

Storyboard Artist

Kim Burke

Wrangler

Erik Burns

Visual Effects

Michelle Butler

Visual Effects

Brian Callahan

Costumes

Gary L Camp

Camera Assistant

Colin Campbell

Lighting Technician

Debbie Carlson

Other

Jon Carpenter

Transportation Co-Captain

Leo C Castellano

Makeup

Oscar G Castillo

3-D Animator

Clete Cetrone

Other

Fabrice Ceugniet

Other

James Churchman

Stunts

Barry Chusid

Art Director

Joe Coble

Craft Service

David A. Cohen

Dialogue Editor

Harry Cohen

Sound Effects Editor

Barry W Coleman

Other

Keith Collea

Video Assist/Playback

Scott Edward Collins

Props Assistant

Scott Collins

Props Assistant

Ron Colucci

Mechanical Special Effects

Jacqui Compton-jensen

Camera Assistant

Brent Conley

Makeup Assistant

Andrew Cooper

Photography

Matt Cordner

Visual Effects

Sebastian Cramer

Producer

Doug Creel

Visual Effects

Corky Cronin

Set Production Assistant

Diane Crooke

Costume Supervisor

Shirley Fulton Crumley

Extras Agent/Coordinator

James M Crumpley

Set Production Assistant

Tim T. Cunningham

Effects Coordinator

Brad Curry

Other

John T. Cypert

Stunts

George Da Silva

Visual Effects

Thomas Dadras

Visual Effects Supervisor

Michael Dahan

Associate Producer

Brigitte Daloin

Editor

Chris Dawson

Motion Control

Yves De Bono

Mechanical Special Effects

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Dicky Deats

Key Grip

Jerry C Deats

Key Grip

Jeff Debell

Other

Guillaume Delouche

Props Assistant

Aaron Dem

Production

Caleb Deschanel

Director Of Photography

Caleb Deschanel

Dp/Cinematographer

Matthew Dettmann

Foley Artist

Sean Devine

Grip

Dean Devlin

Producer

Lisa Di Santo

Assistant

Bill Diaz

3-D Animator

Alianne Diehl

3-D Models

Dino Dimuro

Sound Effects Editor

Gina Disanto

Assistant

Alan Disler

Assistant

Paul Doble

Assistant

William Dotter

Production Assistant

Peter J Dowd

Assistant Director

Jon Doyle

Visual Effects

Scott Drion

Dolly Grip

Richard Duarte

Foley Mixer

Robert Dudley

Best Boy Grip

Brian Duffy

Stunts

John Dulno

Other

James R. Dyer

Unit Production Manager

Susan Ehrhart

Assistant Production Coordinator

Katrina Elder

Other

Melissa Elliott

Titles

Roland Emmerich

Executive Producer

Ute Emmerich

Executive Producer

Jeremy Engleman

Visual Effects

Mitch Enzmann

Motion Control

Robert E Erickson

Other

John W Ervin

Production Assistant

Cecilia Escobar

Accounting Assistant

Kelly Everett

Costumes

Michael J. Fahey

Grip

Mark Farris

Assistant

Conny Fauser

Visual Effects Supervisor

Julie Fay

Set Production Assistant

Patricia Fay

Location Manager

William Fay

Executive Producer

Alexandra Fernandez

Set Production Assistant

Billy W Fields

Medic

Derek Fields

Mechanical Special Effects

Andreas Fischer

Visual Effects

Christian Fletcher

Stunts

Gladys Flournoy

Other

J R Flournoy

Assistant

Riley Flynn

Other

David Fogg

Visual Effects

Nickson Fong

Animator

Douglas Ford

Production Assistant

Michelle Ford

Extras Casting Assistant

Mark Franco

Executive Producer

Laura Frank

Assistant

Phil Fravel

Mechanical Special Effects

Adam Frazier

Other

Chad Frey

Set Designer

Alex Friedrich

Visual Effects

Gordon E Frye

Other

Yvonne Gabrielli

Craft Service

Suzette Gaconnier

Script Supervisor

Stefan Galleithner

Other

Cynthia Garcia

Assistant

Antonio Garrido

Dolly Grip

Harry Garvin

Steadicam Operator

Jonathan S Gaynor

Sound Mixer

Joshua Geller

Production Assistant

Kay Georgiou

Hair

Scott Getzinger

Assistant Property Master

Hannah Gibson

Production Assistant

Lance Gilbert

Stunts

Tim Gilbert

Stunts

Troy Gilbert

Stunts

Jack Gilchrist

Other

Patricia M Glasser

Hair Stylist

Marquetta L Goodwine

Consultant

Marquetta L Goodwine

Song

Jacquelin Gordon

3-D Animator

Mark R. Gordon

Producer

Ken Gorrell

Mechanical Special Effects

Timothy Grady

Production Assistant

Laura Graham

Adr Editor

Jason Gray

Stunts

Joseph Gray

Other

Jim Grce

Lighting Technician

Shane Greedy

Transportation Captain

Bill Greenberg

Rigging Gaffer

Elizabeth Greenberg

Casting Associate

Mark Griffin

Mechanical Special Effects

Tad Griffith

Stunts

Lee Grubin

Assistant Editor

Joachim Gruninger

Digital Effects Supervisor

Abra Grupp

Visual Effects

Gregory G. Hale

Assistant Director

Per Hallberg

Sound Editor

David Halsey

Hair Stylist

James Halty

Stunts

Michael Hansen

On-Set Dresser

Clifford Happy

Stunts

Douglas Harlocker

Property Master

Thomas Robinson Harper

Stunts

Silke Hartung

Visual Effects

Todd Alan Harvey

3-D Animator

Film Details

Also Known As
Patriot, Patriot (Chemin de la liberte), The, Patriota, Patrioten, patriot: Le chemin de la liberté
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Historical
War
Biography
Period
Release Date
2000
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
South Carolina, USA; North Carolina, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 38m

Award Nominations

Best Cinematography

2000

Best Score

2000

Best Sound

2000

Articles

The Patriot


Throughout Hollywood's history, choosing the American Revolution as subject matter has almost always been regarded as a losing business proposition, and that's not likely to change. Blame it on the expense of attaining historical accuracy, or the lack of immediacy to the movie-going public; neither factor is going to decrease with the continuing passage of the years. By the late 1990s, the director/producer team of Roland Emmerich and Dean Devlin, having established their box-office clout with the immensely profitable sci-fi hit Independence Day (1996), were confident they had a Revolutionary War project that would buck the trend. Mounted as a blockbuster for the summer 2000 season, $25 million of its estimated $110 budget went to land a very-much-at-his-peak Mel Gibson in the lead. As it wound up, the domestic earnings of The Patriot (2000) came in at just some $3 million over the break-even point, and while audience and critical response was generally favorable, it's a safe assumption going forward that few scripts with redcoats will be greenlighted.

The filmmakers' original intent was to present a straight-up biography of Francis Marion (1732-1795), the South Carolina militiaman whose utilization of guerrilla tactics earned him the sobriquet of "The Swamp Fox" from the flustered British military brain trust. (Marion was, in fact, portrayed by Leslie Nielsen in a Disney "Swamp Fox" TV series in the late '50s-early '60s). When research brought more controversial aspects of Marion's life and career to light, however, the screenplay by Robert Rodat (Saving Private Ryan, 1998) opted to make the central character an amalgam of Marion and other period figures.

The Patriot opens in 1776 on the South Carolina plantation spread of Benjamin Martin (Gibson), a young widower whose battle exploits in the French and Indian Wars have become a local legend. However, Martin has had his fill of conflict, and his all-encompassing focus is now the family of seven children that he's raising alone. While his eldest, Gabriel (Heath Ledger), is very much caught up in the Colonials' cause, Benjamin is avowedly neutral regarding the skirmishes erupting around him, offering succor to wounded soldiers on both sides.

Of course, fate will pull Martin off the fence, and it comes in the form of the irretrievably heinous Colonel William Tavington (Jason Isaacs), a callous exponent of might-makes-right who views Benjamin's granting relief to the revolutionaries as treason. Beyond burning the Martin homestead to the ground, he drags Gabriel away for hanging because of his political sentiments, and murders another of Benjamin's sons for sheer sport.

Tavington's actions only cause the British forces to reap the whirlwind, as the vengeance-maddened Martin arms two of his younger sons to assist in Gabriel's rescue, an act accomplished by the tomahawk-wielding former gentleman farmer with stunning brutality. Wholly devoted to the revolutionary cause, Benjamin's cut-and-run assaults on the Brits have them deeming him "The Ghost." While General Cornwallis (Tom Wilkinson) holds personal disdain for Tavington's cold-bloodedness, the mounting embarrassments at Martin's hands leave him no choice but to grant him carte blanche in dealing with the rebel, and the path to a final confrontation is assured.

The Patriot certainly had enough resonance with audiences to be a significant career step for two of its principals. Ledger showed a confident and credible on-screen rapport with Gibson, and the role was great exposure for the rising young Australian actor. Isaacs' high villainy landed him on the "Love to Hate" A-list, notably as the imperious Lucius Malfoy in the latter entries in the Harry Potter series. Several moments in the script that would have served to humanize Tavington somewhat wound up on the cutting room floor, for the purpose of ensuring that he would be swiftly established as the heavy. Tavington would be the flashpoint for the largely negative response The Patriot received in the British media, with the sequence in which the officer orders the torching of a church with its parishioners locked inside drawing particular ire.

The filmmakers did strive for historical detail, and Devlin confessed to Smithsonian magazine that the period project offered different demands than the sci-fi stories with which he and Emmerich had been associated. "It was a different discipline, a different level. Thanks to the Smithsonian, we were able to get a lot of things into the picture that weren't in the script when we first read it. I wasn't aware that the American Revolution was fought with a racially integrated army, and that it was the last time we had one until the Korean War." At Oscar® time, The Patriot received a total of three nominations, including Best Cinematography (Caleb Deschanel), Best Original Music Score (John Williams) and Best Sound (Kevin O'Connell, Greg P. Russell and Lee Orloff.)

Producer: Dean Devlin, Mark Gordon, Gary Levinsohn, Roland Emmerich, Ute Emmerich, William Fay
Director: Roland Emmerich
Screenplay: Robert Rodat
Cinematography: Caleb Deschanel
Film Editing: David Brenner, Julie Monroe
Art Direction: Barry Chusid
Music: John Williams
Cast: Mel Gibson (Benjamin Martin), Heath Ledger (Gabriel Martin), Joely Richardson (Charlotte Selton), Jason Isaacs (Col. William Tavington), Chris Cooper (Col. Harry Burwell), Tcheky Karyo (Jean Villeneuve).
C-165m. Letterboxed.

by Jay S. Steinberg
The Patriot

The Patriot

Throughout Hollywood's history, choosing the American Revolution as subject matter has almost always been regarded as a losing business proposition, and that's not likely to change. Blame it on the expense of attaining historical accuracy, or the lack of immediacy to the movie-going public; neither factor is going to decrease with the continuing passage of the years. By the late 1990s, the director/producer team of Roland Emmerich and Dean Devlin, having established their box-office clout with the immensely profitable sci-fi hit Independence Day (1996), were confident they had a Revolutionary War project that would buck the trend. Mounted as a blockbuster for the summer 2000 season, $25 million of its estimated $110 budget went to land a very-much-at-his-peak Mel Gibson in the lead. As it wound up, the domestic earnings of The Patriot (2000) came in at just some $3 million over the break-even point, and while audience and critical response was generally favorable, it's a safe assumption going forward that few scripts with redcoats will be greenlighted. The filmmakers' original intent was to present a straight-up biography of Francis Marion (1732-1795), the South Carolina militiaman whose utilization of guerrilla tactics earned him the sobriquet of "The Swamp Fox" from the flustered British military brain trust. (Marion was, in fact, portrayed by Leslie Nielsen in a Disney "Swamp Fox" TV series in the late '50s-early '60s). When research brought more controversial aspects of Marion's life and career to light, however, the screenplay by Robert Rodat (Saving Private Ryan, 1998) opted to make the central character an amalgam of Marion and other period figures. The Patriot opens in 1776 on the South Carolina plantation spread of Benjamin Martin (Gibson), a young widower whose battle exploits in the French and Indian Wars have become a local legend. However, Martin has had his fill of conflict, and his all-encompassing focus is now the family of seven children that he's raising alone. While his eldest, Gabriel (Heath Ledger), is very much caught up in the Colonials' cause, Benjamin is avowedly neutral regarding the skirmishes erupting around him, offering succor to wounded soldiers on both sides. Of course, fate will pull Martin off the fence, and it comes in the form of the irretrievably heinous Colonel William Tavington (Jason Isaacs), a callous exponent of might-makes-right who views Benjamin's granting relief to the revolutionaries as treason. Beyond burning the Martin homestead to the ground, he drags Gabriel away for hanging because of his political sentiments, and murders another of Benjamin's sons for sheer sport. Tavington's actions only cause the British forces to reap the whirlwind, as the vengeance-maddened Martin arms two of his younger sons to assist in Gabriel's rescue, an act accomplished by the tomahawk-wielding former gentleman farmer with stunning brutality. Wholly devoted to the revolutionary cause, Benjamin's cut-and-run assaults on the Brits have them deeming him "The Ghost." While General Cornwallis (Tom Wilkinson) holds personal disdain for Tavington's cold-bloodedness, the mounting embarrassments at Martin's hands leave him no choice but to grant him carte blanche in dealing with the rebel, and the path to a final confrontation is assured. The Patriot certainly had enough resonance with audiences to be a significant career step for two of its principals. Ledger showed a confident and credible on-screen rapport with Gibson, and the role was great exposure for the rising young Australian actor. Isaacs' high villainy landed him on the "Love to Hate" A-list, notably as the imperious Lucius Malfoy in the latter entries in the Harry Potter series. Several moments in the script that would have served to humanize Tavington somewhat wound up on the cutting room floor, for the purpose of ensuring that he would be swiftly established as the heavy. Tavington would be the flashpoint for the largely negative response The Patriot received in the British media, with the sequence in which the officer orders the torching of a church with its parishioners locked inside drawing particular ire. The filmmakers did strive for historical detail, and Devlin confessed to Smithsonian magazine that the period project offered different demands than the sci-fi stories with which he and Emmerich had been associated. "It was a different discipline, a different level. Thanks to the Smithsonian, we were able to get a lot of things into the picture that weren't in the script when we first read it. I wasn't aware that the American Revolution was fought with a racially integrated army, and that it was the last time we had one until the Korean War." At Oscar® time, The Patriot received a total of three nominations, including Best Cinematography (Caleb Deschanel), Best Original Music Score (John Williams) and Best Sound (Kevin O'Connell, Greg P. Russell and Lee Orloff.) Producer: Dean Devlin, Mark Gordon, Gary Levinsohn, Roland Emmerich, Ute Emmerich, William Fay Director: Roland Emmerich Screenplay: Robert Rodat Cinematography: Caleb Deschanel Film Editing: David Brenner, Julie Monroe Art Direction: Barry Chusid Music: John Williams Cast: Mel Gibson (Benjamin Martin), Heath Ledger (Gabriel Martin), Joely Richardson (Charlotte Selton), Jason Isaacs (Col. William Tavington), Chris Cooper (Col. Harry Burwell), Tcheky Karyo (Jean Villeneuve). C-165m. Letterboxed. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated for the 2000 Award for Best Production Design in a Feature Film - Period/Fantasy from the Society of Motion Picture & Television Art Directors/ Art Directors Guild (ADG).

Winner of the 2000 Award for Best Cinematography from the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC).

Released in United States July 2000

Released in United States on Video October 24, 2000

Released in United States Summer June 28, 2000

Shown at Taormina International Film Festival July 2-9, 2000.

Mel Gibson (CST) reportedly received $25,000,000 to star in this project.

Mel Gibson (CST) reportedly received $25,000,000 to star in this project.

Broadcast in USA on History Channel on June 29, 2000.

Began shooting September 4, 1999.

Completed shooting January 20, 2000.

Released in United States Summer June 28, 2000

Released in United States July 2000 (Shown at Taormina International Film Festival July 2-9, 2000.)

Released in United States on Video October 24, 2000