Tomorrow Never Dies


1h 59m 1997
Tomorrow Never Dies

Brief Synopsis

Someone is pitting the world's superpowers against each other--and only the legendary James Bond (Agent 007) can stop it. When a British warship is mysteriously destroyed in Chinese waters, the world teeters on the brink of World War III--until 007 zeros in on the true criminal mastermind. Bond's do...

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Tomorrow never dies, Demain ne meurt jamais
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Action
Adventure
Thriller
Spy
Adaptation
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Florida, USA; Thailand; Hamburg, Germany; Rosarito, Mexico; London, England, United Kingdom; Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom; Pyrennes, France; Hong Kong; Frogmore, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 59m

Synopsis

Someone is pitting the world's superpowers against each other--and only the legendary James Bond (Agent 007) can stop it. When a British warship is mysteriously destroyed in Chinese waters, the world teeters on the brink of World War III--until 007 zeros in on the true criminal mastermind. Bond's do-or-die mission takes him to Elliot Carver, a powerful industrialist who manipulates world events as easily as he changes headlines from his global media empire. After soliciting help from Carver's sexy wife, Paris, Bond joins forces with a stunning yet lethal Chinese agent, Wai Lin. In a series of explosive chases, brutal confrontations and impossible escapes, including a motorcycle pursuit through Saigon, Bond and Wai race to stop the presses on Carver's next planned news story--global pandemonium.

Crew

Colin Alway

Visual Effects

Michel Arcand

Editor

David Arkell

Pilot

Vic Armstrong

Unit Director

Vic Armstrong

Stunt Coordinator

David Arnold

Music

David Arnold

Song Performer

David Arnold

Song

Martin Asbury

Storyboard Artist

Julian Ashby

Special Effects

Peter Baldock

Editor

Terry Bamber

Production Manager

John Bateman

Adr Mixer

Dickey Beer

Stunts

Ed Behne

Pilot

Bi Benton

Production Coordinator

John Bernard

Production Manager

Don Black

Song

Charles Bodycomb

Other

Peter Bond

Editor

Mark Bowey

Art Director

Roger Bowles

Other

Harry Boyd

Assistant Director

Judy Britten

Production Coordinator

Barbara Broccoli

Producer

Christopher Brosnan

Assistant Director

Stephanie Brugnolo

Other

Mara Bryan

Producer

Nathalie Buce

Cgi Artist

Sonia Calvert

Visual Effects

Allan Cameron

Production Designer

Michael A Carter

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Charles Cash

Cgi Artist

Gunther Castera

Location Manager

Dave Child

Cgi Artist

Jatinderpal Chohan

Post-Production Coordinator

Dale Clarke

Other

Suzanne Clegg

Script Supervisor

John Cochrane

Dialogue Editor

Eddie Collins

Photography

Sean Connor

Camera Operator

Pat Conran

Cgi Artist

Chris Corbould

Special Effects Supervisor

Ken Court

Art Director

Steve Crawley

Digital Effects Supervisor

Sheryl Crow

Song Performer

Sheryl Crow

Song

Rafael Cuervo

Production Manager

Adam Dale

Photography

Gerald Daniels

Other

Jim Davey

Visual Effects

Julian Deferluc

Assistant Director

Nicholas Dodd

Music

Patricia Douglas

Production Coordinator

Alec East

Other

Dina Eaton

Music Editor

Fernanda Echeverria

Production Coordinator

Michael Elson

Visual Effects

Robert Elswit

Dp/Cinematographer

Robert Elswit

Director Of Photography

Simon Emanuel

Assistant Director

Peter Englesson

Production Consultant

Martin Evans

Sound Editor

Ludo Fealy

Editing

Bruce Feirstein

Screenplay

Eithne Fennell

Hair

Peter Field

Camera Operator

Sue Field

Script Supervisor

Ian Fleming

Characters As Source Material

Robert Flemming

Pilot

Dominique Fortin

Editor

Geoff Foster

Sound Mixer

Ian Foster

Camera Operator

Mitchell Froom

Song

Fernando Gallegos

Pilot

Gerry Gavigan

Assistant Director

Alex Gifford

Song Performer

Alex Gifford

Song

Lieutenant Colonel Bruce L Gillman

Technical Advisor

Leonhard Gmur

Production Manager

Nigel Goldsack

Consultant

Laura Goulding

Script Supervisor

Matt Gray

Other

John Greaves

Storyboard Artist

Simon Greenaway

Song Performer

Pierre Guerin

Production Consultant

Gunther Gutersloh

Location Manager

Colette Hailey

Location Manager

Mark Hanna

Pilot

Jamie Harcourt

Camera Operator

Graham V Hartstone

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Ed Hawkins

Visual Effects

Jenny Hawkins

Wardrobe

John Hayward

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Lindy Hemming

Costume Designer

Janet Hirshenson

Casting

Martin Hobbs

Visual Effects

Peter Holt

Foley Editor

John Ireland

Adr Editor

Jane Jenkins

Casting

B D Johnson

Other

Matt Johnson

Visual Effects

Isham Jones

Song

Gus Kahn

Song

S A M Kanzaman

Consultant

Martin Kenzie

Camera Operator

Paul Kirby

Other

Niels Klamroth

Assistant Director

Daniel Kleinman

Main Title Design

Philip Kohler

Production Supervisor

Philip Kwok

Stunts

James Lamb

Visual Effects

K.d. Lang

Song Performer

Claudia Lang-herfurth

Production Coordinator

Sharon Lark

Other

Dominic Lavery

Visual Effects

Jonathan Lee

Art Director

Olaf Lenmann

Assistant Director

Tim Lewis

Production Manager

John Lock

Assistant Director

Russell Lodge

Location Manager

Siobhan Lyons

Production Coordinator

Andrew Macritchie

Editor

Terry Madden

Assistant Director

Simon Marsden

Location Manager

Giles Masters

Art Director

David Mcalmont

Song

Callum Mcdougall

Production Supervisor

Debbie Mcwilliams

Casting

Elliott Meddings

Assistant Director

Rolf Meum

Pilot

Nigel Mills

Dialogue Editor

Janine Modder

Production Manager

Andrew Mortimer

Visual Effects

Chris Munro

Sound Mixer

Ian Munro

Sound Mixer

Pat Nash

Other

Jonathan Neil

Visual Effects

Christine Newell

Foley Editor

Andy Nicholson

Other

Angela Noakes Wharton

Script Supervisor

Monty Norman

Song

Patrick Ohanian

Assistant Director

Pat Pao

Casting

Chris Paul

Editor

Cristin Pescosolido

Visual Effects

Santa Pestonji

Consultant

Daniel Petrie

Other

Daniel Petrie

Screenplay (Uncredited)

Patrick Piallat

Pilot

Claire Pollock

Visual Effects

Nitas Prasit

Pilot

Richard Pryke

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Neil Ravan

Production Manager

Tony Reading

Art Director

Adrian Rhodes

Editor

John Richardson

Miniatures

Rosie Richardson

Other

Pete Romano

Photography

Phillip Roope

Location Manager

Iris Rose

Unit Manager

Anna Roth

Consultant

Marge Rowland

Other

Jo Schotting

Assistant Director

John Scott

Wardrobe Supervisor

Stephen Scott

Art Director

Keith Sewell

Steadicam Operator

Richard Sharkey

Location Manager

Sebastian Silva

Assistant Director

Tony Smith

Pilot

Ladislav Snydr

Pilot

Michael Solinger

Post-Production Supervisor

Mike Stallion

Other

Paul Stentiford

Other

James Stocks

Other

Lionel Strutt

Adr Mixer

Richard Styles

Assistant Director

Charlie Sungkawess

Assistant Director

Sompol Sungkawess

Assistant Director

Kat Szuminska

Visual Effects

Charles Tait

Visual Effects

Jonathan Taylor

Camera

Paul Taylor

Assistant Director

Anthony Waye

Line Producer

Norma Webb

Makeup Supervisor

Marcus Wells

Visual Effects

Gay Whelan

Other

Gil Whelan

Production Manager

Bob Wilcox

Other

David S Williams

Visual Effects

Colin Wilson

Wardrobe

Michael G. Wilson

Producer

Paul Wilson

Photography

Marc Wolff

Other

Mike Woodley

Advisor

Tim Wooster

Camera Operator

Keith Young

Assistant Director

Peter Young

Set Decorator

Elena Zokas

Production Coordinator

Videos

Movie Clip

Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) - Get Your Man Out Of There Just the beginning of the well-received nearly ten-minute action-open, no Pierce Brosnan as 007 but his colleagues, Colin Salmon as Robinson, Judi Dench as “M,” Geoffrey Palmer as Admiral Roebuck, and Ricky Jay seen as the master war-criminal Gupta, in the 19th James Bond feature, Tomorrow Never Dies, 1997.
Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) - Queen And Country, James The admiral (Geoffrey Palmer) and the defence minister (Julian Fellowes, best known now as the creator of Downton Abbey) tangle with M (Judi Dench, supported by her chief of staff, Colin Salmon) about the sinking of a British warship, blamed on China but actually staged by the evil media baron Carver, when Bond (Pierce Brosnan) arrives with still-worse (also contrived) news, and Moneypenny (Samantha Bond) attends as the mission is arranged, in Tomorrow Never Dies, 1997.
Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) - There's No News Like Bad News Götz Otto as as Stamper reports, through Ricky Jay as techno-terrorist Gupta, to the just-introduced German-based English media impresario Carver, on the successful sinking of a British warship, blaming the Chinese, and slaughtering the survivors, staged for the launch of his worldwide news network, in the 19th James Bond feature, Tomorrow Never Dies, 1997, starring Pierce Brosnan.
Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) - I Didn't Realize You Knew Each Other Now in Hamburg, posing as a banker but actually there to investigate global terror instigated by Carver (Jonathan Pryce) for the launch of his global news network, Bond (Pierce Brosnan) makes contact with Carver’s wife Paris (Teri Hatcher), his ex-lover, leading to smoldering conflict, Michelle Yeoh as mysterious Wai-Lin, in Tomorrow Never Dies, 1997.
Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) - They'll Print Anything These Days Having penetrated the Hamburg headquarters of an evil media empire, wielding a souped-up Ericsson phone provided by “Q,” Bond (Pierce Brosnan) gets into the safe of the chief “techno-terrorist,” detects trouble, and encounters Michelle Yeoh, who’s been posing as a Chinese journalist, in his vigorous escape, in Tomorrow Never Dies, 1997.

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Tomorrow never dies, Demain ne meurt jamais
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Action
Adventure
Thriller
Spy
Adaptation
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
Florida, USA; Thailand; Hamburg, Germany; Rosarito, Mexico; London, England, United Kingdom; Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom; Pyrennes, France; Hong Kong; Frogmore, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 59m

Articles

Tomorrow Never Dies


Pierce Brosnan took his second assignment as the most famous secret agent in the world in Tomorrow Never Dies (1997), the 18th official James Bond feature. It was the first 007 film produced after the death of Albert "Cubby" Broccoli, the producer who shepherded the series since its 1962 debut Dr. No and founded Eon Productions. Broccoli's daughter, Barbara Broccoli, and stepson Michael G. Wilson officially took the reins of Eon to produce the biggest film in the franchise to date.

This globetrotting thriller pits Bond against megalomaniac media baron Elliot Carver, a thinly veiled Rupert Murdoch parody played with gusto by Jonathan Pryce. Ruthless and amoral, Carver's motto is "There's no news like bad news" and plots to push the world to the brink of war and take over a destabilized China, grabbing the eyeballs of the world along the way as he turns every step into a breaking news story. Bond is particularly suited to this mission because Carver's beautiful wife Paris (an elegant Teri Hatcher) is also Bond's former lover, but her role is secondary to that of Chinese agent Wai Lin, played by Hong Kong action star Michelle Yeoh. The former Miss Malaysia earned international acclaim performing opposite Jackie Chan in the stunt spectacle Police Story 3: Supercop (1992) and made her English language debut playing the first Bond heroine to not just hold her own but match the suave super-agent blow for blow.

Brosnan made his debut as 007 in GoldenEye (1995) with Judi Dench and Samantha Bond as the new M and Miss Moneypenny, respectively. They return for Tomorrow Never Dies along with Joe Don Baker, reprising his role as CIA agent Jack Wade, and the reliable Desmond Llewelyn, back for his 16th appearance as gadget man Q (he appeared one more time before his death in 1999).

GoldenEye revitalized the franchise with a return to exotic locations and big action set pieces after the box-office disappointment of the grittier Licence to Kill (1989), and a follow-up was quickly planned for a December 1997 release date. The production had to overcome some major obstacles to make the deadline. Eon had numerous script treatments in pocket but wasn't satisfied with any of them and GoldenEye helmer Martin Campbell was unavailable ("Martin just didn't want to do two Bond films in a row," according to his agent). Anthony Hopkins had been in talks to play the villain but dropped out when he committed to The Mask of Zorro (1998), directed by Campbell, ironically enough.

Meanwhile the Leavesden studio, which was built out of an abandoned Rolls-Royce factory to film GoldenEye, was unavailable and Pinewood Studios was unable to accommodate the scope of the productions. So the Eon team built another studio from scratch, this time out of a former grocery warehouse in Hertfordshire, 30 miles from Pinewood. Then, two months before the commencement of production, plans to shoot in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam were halted when their visa was rescinded.

Roger Spottiswoode (who had a big hit with the action comedy Turner and Hooch, 1989) had approached Broccoli about directing a Bond film during the Timothy Dalton tenure in the 1980s. He was signed as director and given a new screenplay by GoldenEye co-writer Bruce Feirstein that tossed Bond into the new world of global media and manipulation. With a script polish by Nicholas Meyer and Daniel Petrie Jr. (among others) under Spottiswoode's direction, the film was rushed into production, with Feirstein continuing to rewrite right up to the start date. Finally, on April 1, 1997--eight months before its scheduled release date--principal photography commenced in London, followed by location shoots in Bangkok (substituting for Vietnam), the Pyrenees in France (doubling for the Khyber Pass), Hamburg, Germany and at the Baja Studios in Mexico to use the giant water tank built for Titanic (1997). The production was able to secure the massive 007 Stage at Pinewood, where the full-size bridge of Carver's Stealth ship was built. The sprawling set was built over a water tank, which played a central role in the climactic battle.

According to Spottiswoode, it was his idea to cast Michelle Yeoh as a different kind of Bond girl. The director put his spin on the action spectacle with Bond guiding a gadget-stocked BMW 750iL through a car park via remote control and a dazzling motorcycle chase with Bond and Wai Lin snaking through the streets of Saigon (recreated at the new Hertfordshire studio) while pursued by cars and a helicopter. And Bond upgrades his reliable Walther PPK with a new Walther P99, a gift from Wai Lin.

According to Spottiswoode, the title of the film was a happy accident. "[W]e had a list of 5 to 10 potential titles, amongst them 'Tomorrow Never Lies'," recalled the director in a 2004 interview. The list was faxed to MGM in the U.S. and the title was misread in the transition. "[T]he next day we had a phone call from MGM, telling us 'We love your title 'Tomorrow Never Dies'! That's going to be it.' Nobody dared to tell them the truth!" With the title in place, the producers invited popular singers and pop groups to submit potential theme songs. Sheryl Crow's song was chosen as the film's signature tune (it earned Golden Globe and Grammy nominations) while a second song written by David Arnold (who composed the score) and sung by k.d. lang played over the end credits.

Tomorrow Never Dies hit its Christmas 1997 window, with a gala premiere on December 9, 1997 followed by a general UK release on December 12 and a U.S. release a week later on December 19. Its American debut coincided with the opening of James Cameron's Titanic, a juggernaut that threatened to sink all competition. Titanic went on to become the biggest moneymaker of all time, a record it held for two decades, but Bond held his own. Tomorrow Never Dies was a worldwide hit and the biggest Bond film yet in the U.S. Brosnan's tenure as Bond was cemented. He returned in 1999 in The World Is Not Enough.

Sources:

Tomorrow Never Dies: Commentary, Vic Armstrong and Michael G. Wilson. MGM Home Entertainment, 2006.
Highly Classified: The World of 007, documentary directed by David L.G. Hughes. MGM Home Entertainment, 1998.
Bond By Design, Meg Simmonds. DK, 2015.
The Essential James Bond, Lee Pfeiffer and Dave Worrall. Boxtree, 1998.
"MGM'S Completion Bond," Rex Weiner and Adam Dawtrey. Variety, December 30, 1996.
"Yesterday's Tomorrow: An Interview with Roger Spottiswoode," Kevin Collette. Mr. KissKiss BangBang website, April 10, 2004.
IMDb

By Sean Axmaker
Tomorrow Never Dies

Tomorrow Never Dies

Pierce Brosnan took his second assignment as the most famous secret agent in the world in Tomorrow Never Dies (1997), the 18th official James Bond feature. It was the first 007 film produced after the death of Albert "Cubby" Broccoli, the producer who shepherded the series since its 1962 debut Dr. No and founded Eon Productions. Broccoli's daughter, Barbara Broccoli, and stepson Michael G. Wilson officially took the reins of Eon to produce the biggest film in the franchise to date. This globetrotting thriller pits Bond against megalomaniac media baron Elliot Carver, a thinly veiled Rupert Murdoch parody played with gusto by Jonathan Pryce. Ruthless and amoral, Carver's motto is "There's no news like bad news" and plots to push the world to the brink of war and take over a destabilized China, grabbing the eyeballs of the world along the way as he turns every step into a breaking news story. Bond is particularly suited to this mission because Carver's beautiful wife Paris (an elegant Teri Hatcher) is also Bond's former lover, but her role is secondary to that of Chinese agent Wai Lin, played by Hong Kong action star Michelle Yeoh. The former Miss Malaysia earned international acclaim performing opposite Jackie Chan in the stunt spectacle Police Story 3: Supercop (1992) and made her English language debut playing the first Bond heroine to not just hold her own but match the suave super-agent blow for blow. Brosnan made his debut as 007 in GoldenEye (1995) with Judi Dench and Samantha Bond as the new M and Miss Moneypenny, respectively. They return for Tomorrow Never Dies along with Joe Don Baker, reprising his role as CIA agent Jack Wade, and the reliable Desmond Llewelyn, back for his 16th appearance as gadget man Q (he appeared one more time before his death in 1999). GoldenEye revitalized the franchise with a return to exotic locations and big action set pieces after the box-office disappointment of the grittier Licence to Kill (1989), and a follow-up was quickly planned for a December 1997 release date. The production had to overcome some major obstacles to make the deadline. Eon had numerous script treatments in pocket but wasn't satisfied with any of them and GoldenEye helmer Martin Campbell was unavailable ("Martin just didn't want to do two Bond films in a row," according to his agent). Anthony Hopkins had been in talks to play the villain but dropped out when he committed to The Mask of Zorro (1998), directed by Campbell, ironically enough. Meanwhile the Leavesden studio, which was built out of an abandoned Rolls-Royce factory to film GoldenEye, was unavailable and Pinewood Studios was unable to accommodate the scope of the productions. So the Eon team built another studio from scratch, this time out of a former grocery warehouse in Hertfordshire, 30 miles from Pinewood. Then, two months before the commencement of production, plans to shoot in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam were halted when their visa was rescinded. Roger Spottiswoode (who had a big hit with the action comedy Turner and Hooch, 1989) had approached Broccoli about directing a Bond film during the Timothy Dalton tenure in the 1980s. He was signed as director and given a new screenplay by GoldenEye co-writer Bruce Feirstein that tossed Bond into the new world of global media and manipulation. With a script polish by Nicholas Meyer and Daniel Petrie Jr. (among others) under Spottiswoode's direction, the film was rushed into production, with Feirstein continuing to rewrite right up to the start date. Finally, on April 1, 1997--eight months before its scheduled release date--principal photography commenced in London, followed by location shoots in Bangkok (substituting for Vietnam), the Pyrenees in France (doubling for the Khyber Pass), Hamburg, Germany and at the Baja Studios in Mexico to use the giant water tank built for Titanic (1997). The production was able to secure the massive 007 Stage at Pinewood, where the full-size bridge of Carver's Stealth ship was built. The sprawling set was built over a water tank, which played a central role in the climactic battle. According to Spottiswoode, it was his idea to cast Michelle Yeoh as a different kind of Bond girl. The director put his spin on the action spectacle with Bond guiding a gadget-stocked BMW 750iL through a car park via remote control and a dazzling motorcycle chase with Bond and Wai Lin snaking through the streets of Saigon (recreated at the new Hertfordshire studio) while pursued by cars and a helicopter. And Bond upgrades his reliable Walther PPK with a new Walther P99, a gift from Wai Lin. According to Spottiswoode, the title of the film was a happy accident. "[W]e had a list of 5 to 10 potential titles, amongst them 'Tomorrow Never Lies'," recalled the director in a 2004 interview. The list was faxed to MGM in the U.S. and the title was misread in the transition. "[T]he next day we had a phone call from MGM, telling us 'We love your title 'Tomorrow Never Dies'! That's going to be it.' Nobody dared to tell them the truth!" With the title in place, the producers invited popular singers and pop groups to submit potential theme songs. Sheryl Crow's song was chosen as the film's signature tune (it earned Golden Globe and Grammy nominations) while a second song written by David Arnold (who composed the score) and sung by k.d. lang played over the end credits. Tomorrow Never Dies hit its Christmas 1997 window, with a gala premiere on December 9, 1997 followed by a general UK release on December 12 and a U.S. release a week later on December 19. Its American debut coincided with the opening of James Cameron's Titanic, a juggernaut that threatened to sink all competition. Titanic went on to become the biggest moneymaker of all time, a record it held for two decades, but Bond held his own. Tomorrow Never Dies was a worldwide hit and the biggest Bond film yet in the U.S. Brosnan's tenure as Bond was cemented. He returned in 1999 in The World Is Not Enough. Sources: Tomorrow Never Dies: Commentary, Vic Armstrong and Michael G. Wilson. MGM Home Entertainment, 2006. Highly Classified: The World of 007, documentary directed by David L.G. Hughes. MGM Home Entertainment, 1998. Bond By Design, Meg Simmonds. DK, 2015. The Essential James Bond, Lee Pfeiffer and Dave Worrall. Boxtree, 1998. "MGM'S Completion Bond," Rex Weiner and Adam Dawtrey. Variety, December 30, 1996. "Yesterday's Tomorrow: An Interview with Roger Spottiswoode," Kevin Collette. Mr. KissKiss BangBang website, April 10, 2004. IMDb By Sean Axmaker

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)


American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57.

He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts.

But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children.

by Michael T. Toole

Vincent Schiavelli (1948-2005)

American Actor Vincent Schiavelli, a classic "I know the face but not the name" character player who had prominent roles in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Nightshift and Ghost, died at his Sicily home after a long battle with lung cancer on December 26. He was 57. He was born on November 10, 1948 in Brooklyn, New York. After he studied acting at New York University's School of the Arts, he quickly landed a role in Milos Foreman's Taking Off (1971), and his career in the movies seldom dropped a beat. Seriously, to not recognize Schiavelli's presence in a movie or television episode for the last 30 years means you don't watch much of either medium, for his tall, gawky physique (a towering 6'6"), droopy eyes, sagging neck skin, and elongated chin made him a casting director's dream for offbeat and eccentric parts. But it wasn't just a striking presence that fueled his career, Schiavelli could deliver the fine performances. Foreman would use him again as one of the mental ward inmates in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975); and he was hilarious as the put-upon science teacher, Mr. Vargas in Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982); worked for Foreman again as Salieri's (F. Murray Abraham's) valet in Amadeus (1984); unforgettable as an embittered subway ghost who taunts Patrick Swayze in Ghost (1990); downright creepy as the brooding organ grinder in Batman Returns (1992); worked with Foreman one last time in The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996); and was a dependable eccentric in Death to Smoochy (2002). Television was no stranger to him either. Although he displayed a gift for comedy playing Latka's (Andy Kaufman) confidant priest, "Reverend Gorky" in a recurring role of Taxi, the actor spent much of his time enlivening shows of the other worldly variety such as Star Trek: The Next Generation, Tales from the Crypt, The X Files, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. In recent years, Schiavelli curtailed the acting, and concentrated on writing. He recently relocated to the Sicilian village of Polizzi Generosa, where his grandparents were raised. He concentrated on his love of cooking and in 2002, wrote a highly praised memoir of his family's history as well as some cooking recipes of his grandfather's titled Many Beautiful Things. He is survived by two children. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video May 12, 1998

Released in United States December 12, 1997

2nd unit photography began in The Pyrennes in mid-January 1997.

Began shooting April 1, 1997.

Completed shooting September 5, 1997.

Daniel Petrie Jr. and Nicholas Meyer both worked on various drafts of the screenplay.

The 18th film in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions and United Artists Pictures.

Released in United States Winter December 19, 1997

Released in United States on Video May 12, 1998

Released in United States December 12, 1997 (Released (premiere) in United Kingdom December 12, 1997.)

Released in United States Winter December 19, 1997