Yes, My Darling Daughter


1h 26m 1939
Yes, My Darling Daughter

Brief Synopsis

A freethinker's liberal ways are tested when her daughter announces plans for a premarital fling.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adaptation
Release Date
Feb 25, 1939
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Yes, My Darling Daughter by Mark Reed (New York, 9 Feb 1937).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Synopsis

Ellen Murray races to the train station to meet Titus Jaywood, the publisher who has come to discuss the publication of her mother Ann's short stories. At the Murray house, Jaywood meets Ellen's aunt, Connie Nevins, who is on the prowl for a new husband after her recent divorce, Ellen's father Lewis who is rushing off for a yachting trip, and Ellen's boyfriend, Douglas Hall. Jaywood is also greeted by "Granny" Whitman, who hints that she knows that he and her daughter Ann shared a youthful fling. When Ellen learns that Doug is leaving to spend two years in Belgium, she decides that they should spend a weekend together alone at the lake. Under the ruse of visiting a girlfriend, Ellen packs to leave for her weekend, but Connie guesses her deception and tells Ann. Confronted by her mother, a pioneer for women's freedom, Ellen responds by accusing Ann of not adhering to her feminist principles, and a chagrinned Ann reluctantly gives Ellen permission to go. When Ellen's father discovers that his daughter is spending the weekend with a man, however, he drives after them, followed by Connie and Jaywood. Granny then calls the police and has them all arrested. Meanwhile, at the lake, Doug sleeps alone on the porch while Ellen sleeps in the bedroom. Arriving home to her father's recriminations, Ellen threatens to leave home and Doug upbraids her family for allowing Ellen to go away with him, then storms out of the house. Granny then advises Ellen to go to Doug, and when he arrives at his boat, he finds her waiting in his cabin to marry him.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adaptation
Release Date
Feb 25, 1939
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Yes, My Darling Daughter by Mark Reed (New York, 9 Feb 1937).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 26m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Articles

Yes, My Darling Daughter


The romantic comedy Yes, My Darling Daughter (1939), which culminates in a shipboard wedding, had the popular team of Priscilla Lane and Jeffrey Lynn as its young lovers. The movie was the fourth of sixth in which the pair starred for Warner Bros.; the others were Four Daughters (1938), Four Wives (1939), The Roaring Twenties (1939), Four Mothers (1941) and Million Dollar Baby (1941). The series that began with Four Daughters costarred Lane's sisters, Lola and Rosemary.

The only Warner Bros. production of its year to be based on a Broadway play, Yes, My Darling Daughter had a daring plotline for its day. Priscilla Lane plays a young woman who is determined to have an un-chaperoned weekend with her fiancé (Lynn). Although her mother (Fay Bainter) is an outspoken feminist, she disapproves of the arrangement and agrees to it only after her daughter learns that, in her youth, she had a similar romantic rendezvous. Even though the lovebirds' weekend turns out to be a chaste affair, their return is greeted with an uproar.

Although perfectly innocent and directed by William Keighley with a light comic touch, Yes, My Darling Daughter created an uproar of its own when the New York State Board of Censors threatened to ban the film because they found some scenes "suggestive." After the situation had generated considerable free publicity, production executive Hal B. Wallis made several judicious cuts that finally appeased the censors. The controversy only fueled public interest in the movie and turned it into such a box-office winner that it opened simultaneously in two Broadway cinemas ­ a rarity at the time.

Producer: Alfred De Liagre Jr.
Director: William Keighley
Screenplay: Casey Robinson, from play by Mark Reed
Art Direction: Carl Jules Weyl
Cinematography: Charles Rosher
Costume Design: Howard Shoup
Editing: Ralph Dawson
Original Music: Heinz Roemheld, Harry Warren
Cast: Priscilla Lane (Ellen Murray), Jeffrey Lynn (Douglas Hall), Roland Young (Titus Jaywood), Fay Bainter (Ann Murray), May Robson (Granny Whitman), Genevieve Tobin (Connie Nevins), Ian Hunter (Lewis Murray).
BW-87m.

by Roger Fristoe
Yes, My Darling Daughter

Yes, My Darling Daughter

The romantic comedy Yes, My Darling Daughter (1939), which culminates in a shipboard wedding, had the popular team of Priscilla Lane and Jeffrey Lynn as its young lovers. The movie was the fourth of sixth in which the pair starred for Warner Bros.; the others were Four Daughters (1938), Four Wives (1939), The Roaring Twenties (1939), Four Mothers (1941) and Million Dollar Baby (1941). The series that began with Four Daughters costarred Lane's sisters, Lola and Rosemary. The only Warner Bros. production of its year to be based on a Broadway play, Yes, My Darling Daughter had a daring plotline for its day. Priscilla Lane plays a young woman who is determined to have an un-chaperoned weekend with her fiancé (Lynn). Although her mother (Fay Bainter) is an outspoken feminist, she disapproves of the arrangement and agrees to it only after her daughter learns that, in her youth, she had a similar romantic rendezvous. Even though the lovebirds' weekend turns out to be a chaste affair, their return is greeted with an uproar. Although perfectly innocent and directed by William Keighley with a light comic touch, Yes, My Darling Daughter created an uproar of its own when the New York State Board of Censors threatened to ban the film because they found some scenes "suggestive." After the situation had generated considerable free publicity, production executive Hal B. Wallis made several judicious cuts that finally appeased the censors. The controversy only fueled public interest in the movie and turned it into such a box-office winner that it opened simultaneously in two Broadway cinemas ­ a rarity at the time. Producer: Alfred De Liagre Jr. Director: William Keighley Screenplay: Casey Robinson, from play by Mark Reed Art Direction: Carl Jules Weyl Cinematography: Charles Rosher Costume Design: Howard Shoup Editing: Ralph Dawson Original Music: Heinz Roemheld, Harry Warren Cast: Priscilla Lane (Ellen Murray), Jeffrey Lynn (Douglas Hall), Roland Young (Titus Jaywood), Fay Bainter (Ann Murray), May Robson (Granny Whitman), Genevieve Tobin (Connie Nevins), Ian Hunter (Lewis Murray). BW-87m. by Roger Fristoe

Quotes

Trivia

Was banned in several parts of the United States due to the subject matter.

The play originally opened in New York City, New York, USA on 9 February 1937 and ran for 405 performances.

Notes

According to a Liberty magazine article, Lewis Seiler was initially to have directed the picture. A Warner Bros. credit sheet contained in the AMPAS Library file on the film notes that Alfred de Liagre, Jr. produced the film, however, other contemporary sources list Hal B. Wallis as the Executive producer and Benjamin Glazer as the Associate producer, and the participation of de Liagre in the released film has not been confirmed. News items in Hollywood Reporter note that although this picture was approved by the Hays Office, it was banned by the New York State censors and the grounds that it might corrupt morals and portrayed "obscene incidents," however, those actions ultimately increased the box office success of the picture.