Carpool


1h 59m 1996

Brief Synopsis

Franklin Laszlo is a hapless, henpecked but eager-to-please carnival owner who's taking a one-shot chance at robbery in order to salvage his business and relationship with his young son. Daniel Miller is a compulsive workaholic resentfully stuck driving the neighborhood carpool, including his own two overlooked sons, on the day of a make-or-break presentation at his advertising agency. Their paths cross in the middle of a bungled robbery when Franklin flees the site, taking Daniel and his vanful of kids as hostages and beginning a comic day-long chase.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 59m

Synopsis

Franklin Laszlo is a hapless, henpecked but eager-to-please carnival owner who's taking a one-shot chance at robbery in order to salvage his business and relationship with his young son. Daniel Miller is a compulsive workaholic resentfully stuck driving the neighborhood carpool, including his own two overlooked sons, on the day of a make-or-break presentation at his advertising agency. Their paths cross in the middle of a bungled robbery when Franklin flees the site, taking Daniel and his vanful of kids as hostages and beginning a comic day-long chase.

Crew

Stuart Aikins

Location Casting

Lawrence Albright

Other

L Caroline Allart

Stunts

Raymond Alley

Other

Grace Anderson

Assistant Costume Designer

Mary Andrews

Adr Editor

Kevin Andruschak

Stunts

Denny Arnold

Stunts

Sandes Ashe

Assistant Camera Operator

Ken Ashley-johnson

Best Boy

Scott Ateah

Stunts

Ruth Atkinson

Assistant

Siegfried Augustine

Driver

Paul Aulicino

Apprentice

Bill Babington

Assistant Editor

Charity Bailey

Song

Ian Ballard

Hairdresser

Carol Banever

Assistant

Gail Barrett

Costume Supervisor

Robert Barryhill

Song

Becky Bates

Stunts

John Beal

Song

Shauna Beal

Assistant

Rodney Beech

Transportation Captain

Philip Beer

Stand-In

Guy Bews

Stunts

Harry Black

Driver

Gary Blufer

Audio

Brent Boates

Storyboard Artist

Curt Bonn

Stunts

Brian J Boyer

Driver

Stewart Bradley

Special Effects Coordinator

Bob Bradshaw

Sound Editor

Jim Brebner

Assistant Director

Dillard Brinson

Key Grip

Don Briscoe

Driver

Lance Brown

Sound Editor

Eric Bryson

Stunts

Gavin Buhr

Stunts

Jim Burrage

Props Buyer

Kelly Cabral

Audio

Fitch Cady

Executive Producer

Yves Cameron

Stunts

Peter G Capadouca

Best Boy

Tom Carlson

Music Editor

Stephen Carr

Driver

Tanya Carroll

Set Production Assistant

Clarence Carter

Song

Dan Cervin

Special Effects

Doug Chapman

Stunts

Marila Chappelle

Post-Production Accountant

Pierre-paul Charbonneau

Other

Colby Chartrand

Stunts

Lauro Chartrand

Stunts

Cydnee Chasmar

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Jeff Chivers

Stunts

Dean Choe

Stunts

Mel Christensen

Foreman

Marco Ciccone

Camera Operator

Jessica Clothier

Script Supervisor

Sandy Cochrane

Art Director

Douglas Colvin

Song

Patrick Connelly

Song

Robin J N Coope

Stunts

Rich Cowan

Assistant Director

Gavin B Craig

Best Boy

Doug Craik

Camera Operator

Jeffrey Cranford

Assistant Sound Editor

Mike Crestejo

Stunts

Garvin Cross

Stunts

Lee Aubre Culp

Stunts

John Cummings

Song

Paul Cunningham

Other

Jayne Dancose

Makeup Assistant

Marcus Daniel

Song

Bonnie Daniels

Production Associate

John Debney

Music

John Debney

Music Arranger

Marc Deschaine

Adr Editor

Duane Dickinson

Stunts

Jean-luc Dinsdale

Camera Assistant

Joe Divitale

Sound Editor

John Dodds

Stunts

Chris Dolbec

Construction

Ingrid Dordar

Stunts

Mona Doulet

Stunts

Victoria Down

Makeup

Michael Dressel

Foley Editor

Stephen Duke

Other

Michelle Eastham-bartolo

Accountant

Gordon Ecker

Sound Editor

Bill Edwards

Stunts

Tom Eirikson

Stunts

Marny Eng

Stunts

Les Erskine

Gaffer

Alette Falle

Stunts

Alette Falle

Stand-In

John Michael Fanaris

Sound Effects

Felix Fanzega

Driver

Dominique Fauquet-lemaitre

Set Decorator

Will Fearn

Location Manager

Louis Febre

Music Arranger

Heather Feeney

Stand-In

Heather Feeney

Stunts

Dorothy Fehr

Stunts

Allan Fenske

Driver

Vince Filippone

Assistant Editor

Jim Finbeiner

Stunts

David Footman

Assistant Director

Gil Forrester

Dolly Grip

Vanessa Paris Foster

Stunts

Garyle Frazer

Stunts

Bruno Fruscalzo

Set Production Assistant

Mary Frymire

Set Production Assistant

Frank A Fuller

Sound Editor

James Fuller

Song

Steve Garber

Set Production Assistant

Sandy Garcia

Foley Recordist

Aris Georgiopoulos

Camera Assistant

Steven Gerrior

Assistant Sound Editor

Anthony Giacinti

Boom Operator

Penny Gibbs

Production Coordinator

Bruce Giesbrecht

Assistant Editor

Rick J Giles

Driver

Cory Glass

Stunts

Jason Glass

Stunts

Tom Glass

Stunts

Gordon Glen

Driver

Boyd Godfrey

Sign Writer

Mark Gonzales

Sound

Casey Grant

Unit Production Manager

Casey Grant

Associate Producer

James Grant

Stand-In

Marilyn Gray

Foley Mixer

Alex Green

Stunts

Jim Green

Other

Leesa Green

Craft Service

Kasandra Greene

Office Assistant

Bill Haines

Other

William Haines

Location Casting

Barbara Harris

Voice Casting

Niki Harris

Song Performer

Nigel Harrison

Song

Deborah Harry

Song

Jay Hawkins

Assistant

Craig Henderson

Construction Coordinator

Beverley Hendry

Stand-In

Beverley Hendry

Stunts

Michael Herbick

Rerecording

Jennifer Hill

Props Assistant

Adam Hogarth

Set Production Assistant

Sharon Holownia

Stunts

Eunice Holsaert

Song

Paul Holzborn

Foley Artist

Glenn Hoskinson

Sound Editor

Dave Hospes

Stunts

Gaston Howard

Stunts

Kim Howey

Stunts

Kathy Hubble

Stunts

Liza Huget

Stunts

Jeff Hyman

Song

Chuck Ingram

Driver

Carol Jackson

Stunts

Ernie Jackson

Stunts

David Jacox

Stunts

Gaetan Jalbert

Other

Paul Jenkinson

Lead Set Dresser

Kirk Johns

Unit Location Manager

Ken S Johnson

Music

Jamie Jones

Stunts

George Josef

Stunts

Walter Kachmar

Stunts

Herminio Kam

Other

Trish Keating

Costume Designer

John G Kennedy

On-Set Dresser

Ken Kirzinger

Stunts

Lori Knight

Stunts

Yuka Kobayashi

Stunts

Bryan Korenberg

Property Master

Geoff C Lands

Production Associate

L James Langlois

Editor

Michael Langlois

Stunts

Pat Lauwers

Sound

Don Leask

Other

Eric Lemay

Special Effects

Lee Lemont

Foley Editor

John Leroy

Key Grip

Brad Loree

Stunts

Kevin A Lublin

Assistant

Julie Macdonald

Costumes

Al Mackinnon

Other

Mary Jo Macvey

Other

J.j. Makaro

Stunts

Steve Mann

Sound Editor

Blake Marion

Sound Effects

Phil Marshall

Song

Phil Marshall

Song Performer

Phil Marshall

Music Arranger

Cotton Mather

Stunts

Kathy Mccart

Other

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 59m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger


ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Tcm Remembers - Rod Steiger

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 23, 1996

Released in United States on Video December 23, 1996

The theatrical release of "Carpool" will be accompanied by the animated Looney Tunes short "Superior Duck" from veteran director Chuck Jones.

Completed shooting November 16, 1995.

Began shooting August 8, 1995.

Released in United States Summer August 23, 1996

Released in United States on Video December 23, 1996