Mimic


1h 45m 1997

Brief Synopsis

Three years ago, two young scientists teamed up to save New York City from an roach-borne epidemic that was killing thousands of children. Their miracle of genetic engineering was the Judas Breed, an insect whose enzimes proved deadly to the disease-carrying roaches. However, their creation has come back to haunt them, altering the balance of nature and tipping the scales in favor of the insects. The thing created in the lab has changed, and now, out there in the city it has begun to mimic the most dangerous predator of all---humans.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Horror
Thriller
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
Dimension Films
Location
New York, USA; Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Synopsis

Three years ago, two young scientists teamed up to save New York City from an roach-borne epidemic that was killing thousands of children. Their miracle of genetic engineering was the Judas Breed, an insect whose enzimes proved deadly to the disease-carrying roaches. However, their creation has come back to haunt them, altering the balance of nature and tipping the scales in favor of the insects. The thing created in the lab has changed, and now, out there in the city it has begun to mimic the most dangerous predator of all---humans.

Crew

Pete Anthony

Original Music

Maria Armstrong

Casting

Jean-yves Audouard

Character Animation

Sandina Bailo-lape

Foley Editor

Wendy Baldwin

Visual Effects

Robert Ballantyne

Storyboard Artist

Marc Banich

Other

Megan Banning

Assistant Director

John Bannister

Other

Kerry Barden

Casting

Marco Beltrami

Music

Marco Beltrami

Original Music

Phil Benson

Sound Editor

Louise Bertrand

Production Manager

Enrique Bilsland

Other

Stephen R Blandino

Puppeteer

Steve Boeddeker

Sound Design

Ole Bornedal

Producer

Bill Boston

Original Music

Rob Bottin

Special Effects

Dan Bradley

Stunt Coordinator

Richard Bronskill

Other

Al Broussard

Other

Reid Burns

Visual Effects

Alex Busby

Animator

Wes Caefer

Other

Jon Campfens

Visual Effects Supervisor

Lawrence Carroll

Visual Effects

John C Casey

Costume Supervisor

Mario Castillo

Other

Fred Cervantes

Other

Dennis Chapman

Unit Production Manager

Penny Charter

Assistant Director

Kim Chow

Wardrobe

Bob Clark

Art Department

Grady Cofer

Visual Effects

Gilles Corbeil

Steadicam Operator

Gilles Corbeil

Camera Operator

Janet Cormak

Scenic Artist

Stuart Cornfeld

Co-Executive Producer

Jeff Crandell

Location Manager

Scott Crawford

Visual Effects

Bret Culp

Animator

Colin Cunningham

Animator

Pam Cveticanin

Other

Enid Dalkoff

Visual Effects

Sam De La Torre

Other

Marie Del Prete

Makeup Artist

Guillermo Del Toro

From Story

Guillermo Del Toro

Screenplay

Lisa Campbell Demaine

Assistant Director

Marie-sylvie Deveau

Costume Designer

Tamara Deverell

Art Director

Brian Dooley

Other

Leo Duranona

Storyboard Artist

Zach Dveticanin

Other

Tony Eckert

Foley Mixer

Robert Ellenstein

Song

Tyruben Ellingson

Special Effects

Michael S Esbin

Puppeteer

Michael S Esbin

Art Department

Sara Fillmore

Other

David Flaherty

Location Manager

Peter Devaney Flanagan

Editor

Suzanne Fox

Adr Editor

John Fraser

Matte Painter

Leigh French

Voice Casting

Rick Gajdecki

Wrangler

Elinor Rose Galbraith

Set Decorator

Jose Antonio Garcia

Sound Mixer

Walter Gasparovic

Assistant Director

Glen Gauthier

Sound Recordist

Richard Gelfand

Production Supervisor

Stuart Goetz

Music Editor

Alec Gould

Song

Cary Granat

Coproducer

Matthew Greenberg

Screenplay

Lorna Gusner

Visual Effects

Samara Hagopian

Other

Bob Hall

Other

Michele Harney

Wardrobe Supervisor

Dion Hatch

Visual Effects

Clark Henderson

Associate Producer

Clark Henderson

Post-Production Supervisor

Ian Hendry

Sound Mixer

Lora Hirschberg

Rerecording

Steve Hoeger

Other

Billy Hopkins

Casting

Paul Howarth

Visual Effects

W. Peter Iliff

Screenplay

Jeff Jackson

Other

Shauna Jamison

Production Coordinator

Sasha Jarh

Unit Production Manager

Brian Jennings

Visual Effects Supervisor

Bill Jordan

Consultant

Alexandre Joset

Character Animation

Lee Joyner

Other

Lawrence Karman

Camera Operator

Susan Kelber

Hair Stylist

Robert Kensinger

Set Decorator

Edie Kerschl

Makeup Artist

Mandy Ketcheson

Assistant Director

Tom Killeen

Puppeteer

Tom Killeen

Art Department

Dana Klaren

Puppeteer

John Kurlander

Other

Steven R. Kutcher

Animal Wrangler

Traver Lalonde

Effects Coordinator

Francois Lambert

Visual Effects

Jim Latham

Song

Dan Laustsen

Director Of Photography

Rick Lazzarini

Mechanical Special Effects

Rick Lazzarini

Puppeteer

Daniel Leduc

Digital Effects Supervisor

Eric Lessard

Character Animation

Tim Lidstone

Other

Jim Lovisek

Animal Wrangler

Grant Lucibello

Assistant Director

Patrick Lussier

Editor

Peter Luxford

Camera Operator

Doug Macleod

Song Performer

Tristan Maduro

Other

John Mariella

Animation Director

Carol Marinoff

Hair Stylist

Jeff Marshall

Casting

Gary Martinez

Puppeteer

Jay Mcclennan

Art Department

Chris Mcgeary

Music Editor

Ray Mendez

Consultant

Kyle Menzies

Animator

Frank 'pepe' Merel

Rerecording

Jeff Metocovich

Visual Effects

Michael Minkler

Rerecording

Todd Minobe

Other

Todd Minobe

Puppeteer

Ross Mirsky

Assistant Director

Marnie Moore

Foley Artist

Michael J. Moore

Assistant Director

Sebastien Moreau

Visual Effects

Donald J. Mowat

Makeup Artist

Bob Munroe

Animation Director

Tom Myers

Sound Design

Ng

Animator

Dominique Normand

Visual Effects

Cindy Ochs

Other

Jeffrey A. Okun

Consultant

Scott Oshita

Puppeteer

Abby Gail Palanker

Post-Production Coordinator

Carol Pears

Script Supervisor

Evan Penny

Art Department

Marc Perrera

Other

Michael Phillips

Executive Producer

Stephen Pladino

Art Department

Francis Polve

Visual Effects

Brian Poor

Other

Richard Potter

Coproducer

B.j. Rack

Producer

Branko Racki

Stunt Coordinator

Pierre Raymond

Visual Effects

Greg Reter

Other

Torr Rex

Other

Randi Richmond

Unit Manager

Matthew Robbins

From Story

Matthew Robbins

Screenplay

Larry Roberts

Pyrotechnics

Andrew Rona

Coproducer

Ted Ross

Special Effects Supervisor

Dug Rotstein

Script Supervisor

Ronald G Roumas

Other

Anton Rupprecht

Other

Anton Rupprecht

Puppeteer

Thomas Sacchi

Character Animation

Marla Saltzer

Assistant Director

Claire Sanfilippo

Dialogue Editor

Robin Sarafinchan

Production Coordinator

Naomi A Sato

Visual Effects

Chris Scarabosio

Sound Effects Editor

Erik Schaper

Puppeteer

Erik Schaper

Art Department

Ron Schmidt

Production Coordinator

Craig Seitz

Other

Ralph Sevazalian

Animator

Scott Shiffman

Coproducer

Robert Shoup

Sound Editor

Bryan Sides

Puppeteer

Bryan Sides

Other

Jessie Silver

Matte Painter

Lorraine Silver

Visual Effects

Brian Simpson

Other

Brian Simpson

Puppeteer

Gordon Smith

Makeup Artist

Greg Smith

Other

Suzanne Smith

Casting

Carol Spier

Production Designer

Chris Squires

Steadicam Operator

Steve Stewart

Other

Dianna Stirpe

Dialogue Editor

Mary Stuart

Visual Effects

Cindy-lou Tache

Art Department

Mick Tebb

Art Department

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Horror
Thriller
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
Dimension Films
Location
New York, USA; Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Articles

Mimic (Blu-Ray) - Guillermo Del Toro's MIMIC: THE DIRECTOR'S CUT on Blu-Ray


The talented Guillermo del Toro made his name and reputation as a writer and director of horror pictures, scoring big with the powerful fantasy-drama Pan's Labyrinth as well as producing films directed by others. After the cult success of 1993's Cronos, a supernatural chiller about a vampiric mechanical insect, del Toro turned his attention to science fiction insect monsters for 1997's Mimic. Confronted by a genetically-bred horde of cockroach horrors, the story's human heroes use scientific tactics similar to those seen in the pandemic saga Contagion. The resulting semi-intelligent insects are more believable than one might think. Aided by a talent for imitating humans, these nasty mutant bugs prowl the subway platforms for after-hours victims. Audiences that think '50s- style monster movies are silly will be taken by surprise when Mimic's subtle scares begin to build.

Mimic presents a valid warning to scientists seeking to fine-tune the ecosystem. Caring researcher Susan Tyler (Mira Sorvino) saves millions of New York children from a deadly virus by releasing genetically altered cockroaches that decimate the disease carriers. Three years later evidence suggests that the new strain of 'Judas cockroach' developed by Sorvino has not died off as planned, and instead has mutated into a completely unexpected forms. Ambitious slum kids and nervous sewer workers bring in terrifying evidence of insects as big as people. The search for the creatures leads Sorvino's husband, Center for Disease Control doctor Peter Mann (Jeremy Northam), into the vast maze of abandoned subway tunnels under Manhattan. Uncooperative transit cop guide Leonard (Charles S. Dutton) is surprised to find no homeless people living in their usual haunts. For that matter, the investigators see no rats, which should be everywhere in the dark tunnels.

The screenplay by del Toro and veteran Matthew Robbins saves the last half of the movie for a harrowing descent into the monsters' lair. They learn as they go. The new super bugs have evolved lungs, allowing them to grow much larger than ordinary insects. Like many insect species, they are masters of disguise: the adult monsters have developed the ability to roughly imitate humans, and habitually creep around the dark margins of the city without being noticed. Susan applies the same tactic for her counter-strategy. When her fellow humans smear themselves with bug excretions (!) the killer insects fail to recognize them as enemies, and pass them by. Little Alexander Goodwin, the son of a shoeshine man played by Giancarlo Giannini, imitates the insects' clicking by playing the same staccato patterns on his spoons. The noise serves as an insect "password", allowing the boy to avoid the fate of some other unlucky children.

This Director's Cut rearranges some scenes and adds others, allowing del Toro to flesh out concepts cut from the shorter Theatrical Version. A subtext suggests that man's tenure as ruler of the Earth may have expired, and that the insects will take over. Susan and Peter are having difficulties conceiving a baby, a procreation problem not shared by the incredibly fecund bug monsters. The creatures are well on the way to consolidating their nest and overrunning the city.

Del Toro's expert direction encourages us to accept everything on view, before considerations of realism and effects work come into play. Special makeup effects expert Rob Bottin (The Howling, RoboCop) was tapped to design some of the all-too-credible bug monsters. The elaborate underground sets are equally convincing and include a vintage electric subway car that the humans must hot-wire to make their escape. The expositional dialogue is unusually good save for a few scenes in which Susan explains basic aspects of insect life to children, informational points that of course become crucial in the later monster siege. Some of the juvenile dialogue is also on the weak side, as when a slum kid tells Susan, "whatever peels your banana."

Mimic will remind viewers of the underground battles with giant ants in the vintage Sci-fi classic Them! There's even a search for a lost child seized by the monsters. Susan's instinctual female warrior suggests another monster classic, 1979's Alien with Sigourney Weaver.; as she's pregnant, Susan is defending her unborn progeny as well. Guillermo del Toro's exciting film reinvigorates a discredited genre by reviving qualities long absent from monster movies. The story is intelligent and sympathetic to its characters, and none of the killings are cynical or gratuitous. These human heroes deserve to survive. Mimic is a smart, suspenseful thriller that never insults our intelligence.

Lionsgate's Director's Cut Blu-ray of Mimic is rich, colorful and detailed. Its appreciation requires the full resolution of HD, for cinematographer Dan Laustsen dotes on images of dark monsters creeping out of dark shadows. Any lessening of detail and the proper impression would be lost.

Guillermo del Toro appears visibly pleased by the opportunity to revise Mimic to better reflect his original intentions. He contributes a full commentary, a video introduction and appears in a featurette to explain the changes from the theatrical version. Also included are a behind-the-scenes short subject and a separate examination of the film's special effects. Galleries contain three deleted scenes, storyboard development animatics, a gag reel and the original trailer.

The prolific Del Toro hasn't finished with the classic Sci-fi vibe: his coming project Pacific Rim is said to show humanity constructing huge robots to battle giant alien monsters, as in the Japanese Godzilla fantasies. He promises that it will be "the biggest monster movie ever."

For more information about Mimic, visit Sony Pictures. To order Mimic, go to TCM Shopping.

by Glenn Erickson
Mimic (Blu-Ray) - Guillermo Del Toro's Mimic: The Director's Cut On Blu-Ray

Mimic (Blu-Ray) - Guillermo Del Toro's MIMIC: THE DIRECTOR'S CUT on Blu-Ray

The talented Guillermo del Toro made his name and reputation as a writer and director of horror pictures, scoring big with the powerful fantasy-drama Pan's Labyrinth as well as producing films directed by others. After the cult success of 1993's Cronos, a supernatural chiller about a vampiric mechanical insect, del Toro turned his attention to science fiction insect monsters for 1997's Mimic. Confronted by a genetically-bred horde of cockroach horrors, the story's human heroes use scientific tactics similar to those seen in the pandemic saga Contagion. The resulting semi-intelligent insects are more believable than one might think. Aided by a talent for imitating humans, these nasty mutant bugs prowl the subway platforms for after-hours victims. Audiences that think '50s- style monster movies are silly will be taken by surprise when Mimic's subtle scares begin to build. Mimic presents a valid warning to scientists seeking to fine-tune the ecosystem. Caring researcher Susan Tyler (Mira Sorvino) saves millions of New York children from a deadly virus by releasing genetically altered cockroaches that decimate the disease carriers. Three years later evidence suggests that the new strain of 'Judas cockroach' developed by Sorvino has not died off as planned, and instead has mutated into a completely unexpected forms. Ambitious slum kids and nervous sewer workers bring in terrifying evidence of insects as big as people. The search for the creatures leads Sorvino's husband, Center for Disease Control doctor Peter Mann (Jeremy Northam), into the vast maze of abandoned subway tunnels under Manhattan. Uncooperative transit cop guide Leonard (Charles S. Dutton) is surprised to find no homeless people living in their usual haunts. For that matter, the investigators see no rats, which should be everywhere in the dark tunnels. The screenplay by del Toro and veteran Matthew Robbins saves the last half of the movie for a harrowing descent into the monsters' lair. They learn as they go. The new super bugs have evolved lungs, allowing them to grow much larger than ordinary insects. Like many insect species, they are masters of disguise: the adult monsters have developed the ability to roughly imitate humans, and habitually creep around the dark margins of the city without being noticed. Susan applies the same tactic for her counter-strategy. When her fellow humans smear themselves with bug excretions (!) the killer insects fail to recognize them as enemies, and pass them by. Little Alexander Goodwin, the son of a shoeshine man played by Giancarlo Giannini, imitates the insects' clicking by playing the same staccato patterns on his spoons. The noise serves as an insect "password", allowing the boy to avoid the fate of some other unlucky children. This Director's Cut rearranges some scenes and adds others, allowing del Toro to flesh out concepts cut from the shorter Theatrical Version. A subtext suggests that man's tenure as ruler of the Earth may have expired, and that the insects will take over. Susan and Peter are having difficulties conceiving a baby, a procreation problem not shared by the incredibly fecund bug monsters. The creatures are well on the way to consolidating their nest and overrunning the city. Del Toro's expert direction encourages us to accept everything on view, before considerations of realism and effects work come into play. Special makeup effects expert Rob Bottin (The Howling, RoboCop) was tapped to design some of the all-too-credible bug monsters. The elaborate underground sets are equally convincing and include a vintage electric subway car that the humans must hot-wire to make their escape. The expositional dialogue is unusually good save for a few scenes in which Susan explains basic aspects of insect life to children, informational points that of course become crucial in the later monster siege. Some of the juvenile dialogue is also on the weak side, as when a slum kid tells Susan, "whatever peels your banana." Mimic will remind viewers of the underground battles with giant ants in the vintage Sci-fi classic Them! There's even a search for a lost child seized by the monsters. Susan's instinctual female warrior suggests another monster classic, 1979's Alien with Sigourney Weaver.; as she's pregnant, Susan is defending her unborn progeny as well. Guillermo del Toro's exciting film reinvigorates a discredited genre by reviving qualities long absent from monster movies. The story is intelligent and sympathetic to its characters, and none of the killings are cynical or gratuitous. These human heroes deserve to survive. Mimic is a smart, suspenseful thriller that never insults our intelligence. Lionsgate's Director's Cut Blu-ray of Mimic is rich, colorful and detailed. Its appreciation requires the full resolution of HD, for cinematographer Dan Laustsen dotes on images of dark monsters creeping out of dark shadows. Any lessening of detail and the proper impression would be lost. Guillermo del Toro appears visibly pleased by the opportunity to revise Mimic to better reflect his original intentions. He contributes a full commentary, a video introduction and appears in a featurette to explain the changes from the theatrical version. Also included are a behind-the-scenes short subject and a separate examination of the film's special effects. Galleries contain three deleted scenes, storyboard development animatics, a gag reel and the original trailer. The prolific Del Toro hasn't finished with the classic Sci-fi vibe: his coming project Pacific Rim is said to show humanity constructing huge robots to battle giant alien monsters, as in the Japanese Godzilla fantasies. He promises that it will be "the biggest monster movie ever." For more information about Mimic, visit Sony Pictures. To order Mimic, go to TCM Shopping. by Glenn Erickson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1997

Released in United States on Video March 17, 1998

Released in United States September 1997

Released in United States Summer August 22, 1997

Shown at Deauville Film Festival September 5-14, 1997.

Shown at Venice International Film Festival (Mezzanotte) August 27 - September 6, 1997.

Began shooting September 22, 1996.

Completed shooting January 4, 1997.

Dimension Films is the genre film division of Miramax Films.

John Sayles & Matthew Greenberg were also credited for screenplay on some early prints of the film, but their names were subsequently dropped.

Originally conceived as part of the Dimension anthology film "Light Years."

Released in United States 1997 (Shown at Venice International Film Festival (Mezzanotte) August 27 - September 6, 1997.)

Released in United States on Video March 17, 1998

Released in United States Summer August 22, 1997

Released in United States September 1997 (Shown at Deauville Film Festival September 5-14, 1997.)