Expensive Husbands


1h 2m 1937
Expensive Husbands

Brief Synopsis

A rising film star pays a steep price when she marries a prince for publicity.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
Nov 27, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 2m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Film Length
3,537ft (6 reels)

Synopsis

Actress Laurine Lynne, unable to get work in the United States, travels to Europe hoping to find employment. She makes a grand entrance at a Viennese hotel, and Rupert, one of the waiters, is immediately enchanted by her. He insists on serving her dinner, but angers her when he says that although he admires her a great deal, he can tell from her movie love scenes that she has never known a great love. Joe Craig, Laurine's press agent, arrives with the news that because a certain bad actress is married to a count, she has gotten the part that Laurine wanted. He suggests that Laurine marry a title to help her career, and taking his advice, Laurine advertises for a marriage of convenience. Without realizing that it is Laurine who is advertising, Rupert, who is really an impoverished prince, answers the ad. Both are surprised when they learn the identity of their potential mates, but proceed with the marriage. Although they love each other, both are convinced that the other went through with the marriage for selfish reasons: Laurine for the title, Rupert for the money. Nonetheless, when they are forced to spend their honeymoon night in a hotel that was Rupert's ancestral home, Laurine waits hopefully for her groom to come to bed. Rupert, however, is disgusted by Laurine's determination to return to Hollywood and her career and, in the middle of the night, leaves the hotel. The next morning, Joe calls with the news that Laurine has been signed to a picture. Her reviews are good, but now the press wants to meet the prince. During a press conference, where Laurine proclaims that she and her husband are madly in love, Rupert unexpectedly appears. He whispers that her love scenes have improved, but before he can explain his arrival, Laurine accuses him of returning for her money. Rupert decides to punish her by spending as much money as possible, although as he reveals to Joe, he is actually depositing an equal sum of money to her bank account. Rupert now has money of his own because he met the conditions of a will stipulating that he must earn a certain amount of money before he inherited a fortune. He announces that he is returning to Vienna and begs Laurine to give up her career and come with him. At first, she refuses, but some time later, she arrives at Rupert's home, which he has bought back, ready to be his wife.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
Nov 27, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 2m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Film Length
3,537ft (6 reels)

Articles

Expensive Husbands


Romance, comedy and song are the essential ingredients in Expensive Husbands (1937), a regal-themed mini-musical, and a coup d'etat to director Bobby Connolly's ability to cram so much plot into a 60 minute programmer. The impoverished prince who falls for a well-to-do American movie star, loses her and then, via many humorous complications, wins her back along with his former royal status was pure confection: a prime example of 1930s dream factory fare. Aided by an able cast (led by popular contract players Patric Knowles and Beverly Roberts) and high production values (often borrowed from existing A-feature sets), Expensive Husbands belies its humble cost and running time, and, on the surface, seems like just another pleasant B-plus picture...Or was it?

Warners, always keeping an eye on the headlines for source material, turned to Europe and the real-life romance between American divorcee Wallis Simpson and the future King of England Prince Edward VIII. His abdication of the throne for her hand was the kind of "too good to be true" storyline that even the most gullible audiences would find hard to swallow. The fact that none of it was fabricated prompted the studio to push Expensive Husbands into theaters before the end of the year while the news was still fresh. The strategy paid off. Released during Thanksgiving, the peasant-budgeted six reeler ascended to noble heights, occasionally playing in top half slots to cash in on current events, thus providing a jewel in the crown for the studio B-unit, and a tidy king's ransom for the Warners dynasty.

Producer/Director: Bobby Connolly
Screenplay: Jay Brennan, Lillie Hayward, Jean Negulesco
Production Design: Hugh Reticker, Jr
Cinematography: James Van Trees
Costume Design: Howard Shoup
Film Editing: Louis Hesse
Original Music: M.K. Jerome
Principal Cast: John Butler (Savage), Ann Codee (Maria), Fritz Feld (Herr Meyer), Robert C. Fischer (Joseph), Otto H. Fries (Franz), Eula Guy (Trommy).
BW-62m.

By Mel Neuhaus
Expensive Husbands

Expensive Husbands

Romance, comedy and song are the essential ingredients in Expensive Husbands (1937), a regal-themed mini-musical, and a coup d'etat to director Bobby Connolly's ability to cram so much plot into a 60 minute programmer. The impoverished prince who falls for a well-to-do American movie star, loses her and then, via many humorous complications, wins her back along with his former royal status was pure confection: a prime example of 1930s dream factory fare. Aided by an able cast (led by popular contract players Patric Knowles and Beverly Roberts) and high production values (often borrowed from existing A-feature sets), Expensive Husbands belies its humble cost and running time, and, on the surface, seems like just another pleasant B-plus picture...Or was it? Warners, always keeping an eye on the headlines for source material, turned to Europe and the real-life romance between American divorcee Wallis Simpson and the future King of England Prince Edward VIII. His abdication of the throne for her hand was the kind of "too good to be true" storyline that even the most gullible audiences would find hard to swallow. The fact that none of it was fabricated prompted the studio to push Expensive Husbands into theaters before the end of the year while the news was still fresh. The strategy paid off. Released during Thanksgiving, the peasant-budgeted six reeler ascended to noble heights, occasionally playing in top half slots to cash in on current events, thus providing a jewel in the crown for the studio B-unit, and a tidy king's ransom for the Warners dynasty. Producer/Director: Bobby Connolly Screenplay: Jay Brennan, Lillie Hayward, Jean Negulesco Production Design: Hugh Reticker, Jr Cinematography: James Van Trees Costume Design: Howard Shoup Film Editing: Louis Hesse Original Music: M.K. Jerome Principal Cast: John Butler (Savage), Ann Codee (Maria), Fritz Feld (Herr Meyer), Robert C. Fischer (Joseph), Otto H. Fries (Franz), Eula Guy (Trommy). BW-62m. By Mel Neuhaus

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Released in United States 1937

Released in United States 1937