Double Trouble


1h 30m 1967
Double Trouble

Brief Synopsis

A teen heiress falls for an American rock singer in London.

Photos & Videos

Double Trouble - Movie Posters

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Musical
Release Date
Jan 1967
Premiere Information
New York opening: 24 May 1967
Production Company
B. C. W.
Distribution Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

While American singer Guy Lambert is performing in England, teenage heiress Jill Conway falls head-over-heels in love with him, and he also captures the attention of sophisticated Claire Dunham. In an attempt to forestall the possibility of romance, Jill's uncle and guardian, Gerald Waverly, sends her to school in Brussels, unaware that Guy has a singing engagement there. After a series of near-fatal accidents, it soon becomes apparent to Guy that someone is trying to kill Jill. Furthermore, the young couple are being closely watched by a pair of bumbling thieves who have hidden smuggled jewels in Guy's luggage. In Brussels, the Belgian police and a trio of ineffectual detectives try to help but prove to be of little use. Appointing himself as Jill's protector, Guy exposes Uncle Gerald and Claire Dunham, who is revealed to be Gerald's accomplice, as the would-be murderers who had hoped to inherit Jill's fortune. A mysterious stranger who had been trailing Guy turns out to be a Scotland Yard man, and he apprehends the jewel thieves. With all threats to their happiness removed, Jill and Guy return to England.

Photo Collections

Double Trouble - Movie Posters
Here are a few original release American movie posters for Double Trouble (1967), starring Elvis Presley.

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Musical
Release Date
Jan 1967
Premiere Information
New York opening: 24 May 1967
Production Company
B. C. W.
Distribution Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Double Trouble


In 1967 MGM released Double Trouble, number twenty-four in a long line of features tailored especially for the talents of the King of Rock and Roll - Elvis Presley. In true Elvis form, the film featured several gorgeous women who entered and exited the plot with revolving door precision while Presley crooned tunes; this time he played Guy Lambert, a touring American singer (massive acting stretch!). Lambert is being pursued by two women, hence double the trouble, one of whom is a teenage heiress played by Annette Day. Traveling on his European tour, he's also being chased by jewel thieves and detectives, since stolen loot has been hidden in his luggage. Will Lambert be able to escape the thieves and bumbling detectives? Will Guy get the girl (groan)? If you've seen any Elvis flicks, you probably know the formula by heart

Double Trouble was originally called You're Killing Me, a working title that perhaps wasn't so far off the mark for some. Still a year out from his comeback television special, the King was in a slump. His movies were not faring well at the box office, and his musical offerings weren't doing any better on the charts. Recording sessions for the Double Trouble tracks were difficult; Elvis was disappointed at the content, and for good reason: the film soundtrack failed to produce a single bona-fide hit. The closest contender was "Long Legged Girl (With the Short Dress On)," which topped out at number sixty-three. Coming in at a length of one minute and twenty-six seconds, however, it is the shortest Elvis tune to crack the Hot 100 chart. King fans may shudder to hear him sing "Old MacDonald" in the film; Elvis wasn't too happy about it either. He walked out of the recording session, obviously disgusted at this new low, on the seventh take; the incomplete version had to be used as the film's master version.

The actual filming of Double Trouble was far more pleasurable than the recording sessions. Norman Taurog, who helmed nine other Elvis pics, signed on for directorial duties, which leant an air of stability to the production. An incredibly prolific director, Taurog reached the apex of his career with Boys Town (1938), starring Spencer Tracy. Previously he had garnered the Best Direction Oscar for Skippy (1931), which starred his nephew, Jackie Cooper.

Elvis' supporting cast featured the aforementioned Annette Day as his seventeen-year-old love interest. Discovered by a coproducer in a Portobello Market antique shop in London, Day was cast in what would be her only film. But what a way to go; Elvis even bought her a blue-and-white Mustang sports car during filming. Other cast members included John Williams, Leon Askin, and Chips Rafferty. Williams is best known for his performance as Inspector Hubbard in Dial M for Murder (1954), while Hogan's Heroes aficionados will recognize Askin as General Alfred Burkhalter from the television series. Rafferty was one of Australia's best-known actors and he also made several other U.S. film appearances (The Desert Rats, 1953); The Sundowners, 1960) prior to Double Trouble.

Things weren't what they seemed in Double Trouble; although the script featured European locales, the action was actually shot in the MGM backlots in Culver City, California. And while early publicity for the film boasted nine songs, the released version only had eight - the tune "It Won't Be Long" was cut, its demise likely attributed to the strained relations during the overdubbing sessions. But through it all, Elvis stuck to his film fundamentals: he romanced the pretty girls, shook his hips, sang his songs, and defeated the bad guys. Sure it was formulaic, but if anyone could pull it off, it was Elvis Presley. Why? Because he's the King, baby!

Producer: Judd Bernard, Irwin Winkler
Director: Norman Taurog
Screenplay: Mark Brandel, Jo Heims
Cinematography: Daniel L. Fapp
Editing: John McSweeney, Jr.
Art Direction: George W. Davis, Merrill Pye
Music: Jeff Alexander, Doc Pomus
Cast: Elvis Presley (Guy Lambert), Annette Day (Jill Conway), John Williams (Gerald Waverly), Yvonne Romain (Claire Dunham), Chips Rafferty (Archie Brown), Michael Murphy (Morley), Leon Askin (Inspector De Groote).
C-92m. Closed captioning. Letterboxed.

by Eleanor Quin

Double Trouble

Double Trouble

In 1967 MGM released Double Trouble, number twenty-four in a long line of features tailored especially for the talents of the King of Rock and Roll - Elvis Presley. In true Elvis form, the film featured several gorgeous women who entered and exited the plot with revolving door precision while Presley crooned tunes; this time he played Guy Lambert, a touring American singer (massive acting stretch!). Lambert is being pursued by two women, hence double the trouble, one of whom is a teenage heiress played by Annette Day. Traveling on his European tour, he's also being chased by jewel thieves and detectives, since stolen loot has been hidden in his luggage. Will Lambert be able to escape the thieves and bumbling detectives? Will Guy get the girl (groan)? If you've seen any Elvis flicks, you probably know the formula by heart Double Trouble was originally called You're Killing Me, a working title that perhaps wasn't so far off the mark for some. Still a year out from his comeback television special, the King was in a slump. His movies were not faring well at the box office, and his musical offerings weren't doing any better on the charts. Recording sessions for the Double Trouble tracks were difficult; Elvis was disappointed at the content, and for good reason: the film soundtrack failed to produce a single bona-fide hit. The closest contender was "Long Legged Girl (With the Short Dress On)," which topped out at number sixty-three. Coming in at a length of one minute and twenty-six seconds, however, it is the shortest Elvis tune to crack the Hot 100 chart. King fans may shudder to hear him sing "Old MacDonald" in the film; Elvis wasn't too happy about it either. He walked out of the recording session, obviously disgusted at this new low, on the seventh take; the incomplete version had to be used as the film's master version. The actual filming of Double Trouble was far more pleasurable than the recording sessions. Norman Taurog, who helmed nine other Elvis pics, signed on for directorial duties, which leant an air of stability to the production. An incredibly prolific director, Taurog reached the apex of his career with Boys Town (1938), starring Spencer Tracy. Previously he had garnered the Best Direction Oscar for Skippy (1931), which starred his nephew, Jackie Cooper. Elvis' supporting cast featured the aforementioned Annette Day as his seventeen-year-old love interest. Discovered by a coproducer in a Portobello Market antique shop in London, Day was cast in what would be her only film. But what a way to go; Elvis even bought her a blue-and-white Mustang sports car during filming. Other cast members included John Williams, Leon Askin, and Chips Rafferty. Williams is best known for his performance as Inspector Hubbard in Dial M for Murder (1954), while Hogan's Heroes aficionados will recognize Askin as General Alfred Burkhalter from the television series. Rafferty was one of Australia's best-known actors and he also made several other U.S. film appearances (The Desert Rats, 1953); The Sundowners, 1960) prior to Double Trouble. Things weren't what they seemed in Double Trouble; although the script featured European locales, the action was actually shot in the MGM backlots in Culver City, California. And while early publicity for the film boasted nine songs, the released version only had eight - the tune "It Won't Be Long" was cut, its demise likely attributed to the strained relations during the overdubbing sessions. But through it all, Elvis stuck to his film fundamentals: he romanced the pretty girls, shook his hips, sang his songs, and defeated the bad guys. Sure it was formulaic, but if anyone could pull it off, it was Elvis Presley. Why? Because he's the King, baby! Producer: Judd Bernard, Irwin Winkler Director: Norman Taurog Screenplay: Mark Brandel, Jo Heims Cinematography: Daniel L. Fapp Editing: John McSweeney, Jr. Art Direction: George W. Davis, Merrill Pye Music: Jeff Alexander, Doc Pomus Cast: Elvis Presley (Guy Lambert), Annette Day (Jill Conway), John Williams (Gerald Waverly), Yvonne Romain (Claire Dunham), Chips Rafferty (Archie Brown), Michael Murphy (Morley), Leon Askin (Inspector De Groote). C-92m. Closed captioning. Letterboxed. by Eleanor Quin

Leon Askin (1907-2005)


Leon Askin, the rotund, imposing Austrian character actor, who was best remembered as General Albert Burkhalter, Conolel Klink's exasperated superior on the hit sitcom Hogan's Heroes, died of natural causes on June 3 in his hometown of Vienna. He was 97.

Born in Vienna, Austria as Leo Aschkenasy on September 18, 1907, Askin developed a taste for theater through his mother's love of cabaret, and as a youngster, often accompanied his mother to weekend productions.

He made a go of acting as a profession in 1925, when he took drama classes from Hans Thimig, a noted Austrian stage actor at the time. The following year, he made his Vienna stage debut in Rolf Lauckner's "Schrei aus der Strasse."

For the next six year (1927-33), he was a popular stage actor in both Vienna and Berlin before he was prevented to work on the stage by Hitler's SA for being a Jew. He left for Paris in 1935 to escape anti-semetic persecution, but returned to Vienna in 1935, to find work (albeit a much lower profile to escape scrutiny), but after a few years, the writing was on the wall, and he escaped to New York City in 1939, just at the outbreak of World War II. His luck in the Big Apple wasn't really happening, and in 1941, he relocated to Washington D.C. and briefly held the position of managing director of the Civic Theatre, a popular city venue of the day. Unfortunately, after the tragic events of Pearl Harbor in December of that year, the United States became involved in the war that had already engulfed Europe for two years, and seeing a possibility to expediate his application for American citizenship, he enlisted in the U.S. Army.

After the war, Leon indeed became a U.S. citizen and changed his name from Leon Aschkenasy to Leon Askin. He returned to New York and found work as a drama teacher, and more importantly, landed his first gig on Broadway, as director and actor in Goethe's Faust in 1947, which starred Askin in the title character opposite the legendary Albert Bassermann who played Mephisto. The production was a huge success. Askin followed this up with another director/actor stint with Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice and co-starred with Jose Ferrer in Ben Hecht's 20th Century. They were all Broadway hits, and Askin had finally achieved the success he had worked so hard to seek and merit.

It wasn't long before Hollywood came calling, and soon Askin, with his rich German accent and massive physical presence, made a very effective villian in a number of Hollywood films: the Hope-Crosby comedy Road to Bali (1952); Richard Burton's first hit film The Robe; and the Danny Kaye vehicle Knock on Wood (1954).

Askin's roles throughout the 50's were pretty much in this "menacing figure" vein, so little did anyone suspect that around the corner, Billy Wilder would be offering him his most memorable screen role - that of the Russian commissar Peripetschikof who gleefully embraces Amercian Capitalism in the scintillating politcal satire, One, Two, Three (1961). Who can forget this wonderfully exchange between Peripetschikof and Coca Cola executive C.R. MacNamara (James Cagney):

Peripetschikof: I have a great idea to make money. I have a storage full of saurkraut and I'll sell it as Christmas tree tinsil!
MacNamara: You're a cinch!

His performance for Wilder was wonderfully comedic and wholly memorable, and after One, Two, Three the film roles for Askin got noticable better, especially in Lulu and The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (both 1962); but he began to find prominent guest shots on hit television shows too: My Favorite Martian and The Outer Limits to name a few; yet his big break came in 1965, when for six seasons he played General Albert Burkhalter, the Nazi general who was forever taking Col. Kilink's ineptitude to task in Hogan's Heroes (1965-71).

Roles dried up for Askin after the run of Hogan's Heroes, save for the occassional guest spot on television: Diff'rent Strokes, Three's Company, Happy Days; and parts in forgettable comedies: Going Ape! (1981), Airplane II: The Sequel (1982). After years of seclusion, Askin relocated to his birthplace of Vienna in 1994, and he began taking parts in numerous stage productions almost to his death. In 2002, he received the highest national award for an Austrian citizen when he was bestowed with the Austrian Cross of Honor, First Class, for Science and Art. He is survived by his third wife of three years, Anita Wicher.

by Michael T. Toole

Leon Askin (1907-2005)

Leon Askin, the rotund, imposing Austrian character actor, who was best remembered as General Albert Burkhalter, Conolel Klink's exasperated superior on the hit sitcom Hogan's Heroes, died of natural causes on June 3 in his hometown of Vienna. He was 97. Born in Vienna, Austria as Leo Aschkenasy on September 18, 1907, Askin developed a taste for theater through his mother's love of cabaret, and as a youngster, often accompanied his mother to weekend productions. He made a go of acting as a profession in 1925, when he took drama classes from Hans Thimig, a noted Austrian stage actor at the time. The following year, he made his Vienna stage debut in Rolf Lauckner's "Schrei aus der Strasse." For the next six year (1927-33), he was a popular stage actor in both Vienna and Berlin before he was prevented to work on the stage by Hitler's SA for being a Jew. He left for Paris in 1935 to escape anti-semetic persecution, but returned to Vienna in 1935, to find work (albeit a much lower profile to escape scrutiny), but after a few years, the writing was on the wall, and he escaped to New York City in 1939, just at the outbreak of World War II. His luck in the Big Apple wasn't really happening, and in 1941, he relocated to Washington D.C. and briefly held the position of managing director of the Civic Theatre, a popular city venue of the day. Unfortunately, after the tragic events of Pearl Harbor in December of that year, the United States became involved in the war that had already engulfed Europe for two years, and seeing a possibility to expediate his application for American citizenship, he enlisted in the U.S. Army. After the war, Leon indeed became a U.S. citizen and changed his name from Leon Aschkenasy to Leon Askin. He returned to New York and found work as a drama teacher, and more importantly, landed his first gig on Broadway, as director and actor in Goethe's Faust in 1947, which starred Askin in the title character opposite the legendary Albert Bassermann who played Mephisto. The production was a huge success. Askin followed this up with another director/actor stint with Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice and co-starred with Jose Ferrer in Ben Hecht's 20th Century. They were all Broadway hits, and Askin had finally achieved the success he had worked so hard to seek and merit. It wasn't long before Hollywood came calling, and soon Askin, with his rich German accent and massive physical presence, made a very effective villian in a number of Hollywood films: the Hope-Crosby comedy Road to Bali (1952); Richard Burton's first hit film The Robe; and the Danny Kaye vehicle Knock on Wood (1954). Askin's roles throughout the 50's were pretty much in this "menacing figure" vein, so little did anyone suspect that around the corner, Billy Wilder would be offering him his most memorable screen role - that of the Russian commissar Peripetschikof who gleefully embraces Amercian Capitalism in the scintillating politcal satire, One, Two, Three (1961). Who can forget this wonderfully exchange between Peripetschikof and Coca Cola executive C.R. MacNamara (James Cagney): Peripetschikof: I have a great idea to make money. I have a storage full of saurkraut and I'll sell it as Christmas tree tinsil! MacNamara: You're a cinch! His performance for Wilder was wonderfully comedic and wholly memorable, and after One, Two, Three the film roles for Askin got noticable better, especially in Lulu and The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (both 1962); but he began to find prominent guest shots on hit television shows too: My Favorite Martian and The Outer Limits to name a few; yet his big break came in 1965, when for six seasons he played General Albert Burkhalter, the Nazi general who was forever taking Col. Kilink's ineptitude to task in Hogan's Heroes (1965-71). Roles dried up for Askin after the run of Hogan's Heroes, save for the occassional guest spot on television: Diff'rent Strokes, Three's Company, Happy Days; and parts in forgettable comedies: Going Ape! (1981), Airplane II: The Sequel (1982). After years of seclusion, Askin relocated to his birthplace of Vienna in 1994, and he began taking parts in numerous stage productions almost to his death. In 2002, he received the highest national award for an Austrian citizen when he was bestowed with the Austrian Cross of Honor, First Class, for Science and Art. He is survived by his third wife of three years, Anita Wicher. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

This is one of two films in which Elvis Presley, who in real life was the only one of a pair of twins to survive at birth, played his own double. The other was Kissin' Cousins (1964).

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video December 6, 1988

Released in United States Spring April 1967

Released in United States Spring April 1967

Released in United States on Video December 6, 1988