Octopussy


2h 11m 1983
Octopussy

Brief Synopsis

James Bond (Agent 007) must investigate the murder of a fellow agent who was clutching a priceless Faberge egg at the time of his death. The trail leads to the mysterious Octopussy, whose traveling circus features a company of gorgeous, athletic women. Bond and Octopussy share a passionate attraction, but soon 007 discovers that the elegant Kamal Khan is working with a mad Russian officer to hurl mankind into World War III. As Bond tries to stop the nightmarish scheme, his exploits include a tense chase through the streets of India, a deadly brawl on top of a speeding train, and a treacherous mid-air knife fight on an airplane wing.

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Octopussy
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Spy
Adaptation
Release Date
1983
Production Company
Eon Productions; United Artists Films
Distribution Company
MGM Distribution Company; MGM Home Entertainment; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; United International Pictures
Location
Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 11m

Synopsis

James Bond (Agent 007) must investigate the murder of a fellow agent who was clutching a priceless Faberge egg at the time of his death. The trail leads to the mysterious Octopussy, whose traveling circus features a company of gorgeous, athletic women. Bond and Octopussy share a passionate attraction, but soon 007 discovers that the elegant Kamal Khan is working with a mad Russian officer to hurl mankind into World War III. As Bond tries to stop the nightmarish scheme, his exploits include a tense chase through the streets of India, a deadly brawl on top of a speeding train, and a treacherous mid-air knife fight on an airplane wing.

Cast

Roger Moore

James Bond--Agent 007

Louis Jourdan

Kamal Khan

Maud Adams

Octopussy

Kristina Wayborn

Magda

Kabir Bedi

Gobinda

Steven Berkoff

Orlov

David Meyer

Mischka--One Of The Twins

Tony Meyer

Grischka--One Of The Twins

Vijay Amritraj

Vijay

Desmond Llewelyn

Q

Lois Maxwell

Miss Moneypenny

Robert Brown

M

Walter Gotell

Gogol

Geoffrey Keen

Minister Of Defense

Suzanne Jerome

Gwendoline

Cherry Gillespie

Midge

Albert Moses

Sadruddin

Douglas Wilmer

Fanning

Andy Bradford

Michaela Clavell

Penelope Smallbone

Philip Voss

Auctioneer

Bruce Boa

Us General

Richard Parmentier

Us Aide

Paul Hardwick

Soviet Chairman

Dermot Crowley

Kamp

Peter Porteous

Lenkin

Eva Rueber-staier

Rublevitch

Jeremy Bulloch

Smithers

Tina Hudson

Bianca

William Derrick

Thug With Yo-Yo

Stuart Saunders

Major Clive

Patrick Barr

British Ambassador

Gabor Vernon

Borchoi

Hugo Bower

Karl

Ken Norris

Colonel Toro

Tony Arjuna

Mufti

Gertan Kaluber

Bubi

Brenda Cowling

Schatzl

David Grahame

Petrol Pump Attendant

Brian Coburn

South American Vip

Michael Halphie

South American Officer

Mary Stavin

Octopussy Girl

Carolyn Seaward

Octopussy Girl

Carole Ashby

Octopussy Girl

Cheryl Anne

Octopussy Girl

Jani-z

Octopussy Girl

Julie Martin

Octopussy Girl

Joni Flynn

Octopussy Girl

Julie Barth

Octopussy Girl

Kathy Davies

Octopussy Girl

Helene Hunt

Octopussy Girl

Gillian Deterville

Octopussy Girl

Safira Afzal

Octopussy Girl

Louise King

Octopussy Girl

Tina Robinson

Octopussy Girl

Alison Worth

Octopussy Girl

Janine Andrews

Octopussy Girl

Lynda Knight

Octopussy Girl

Susanne Dando

Gymnast Supervisor

Teresa Craddock

Gymnast

Tracy Llewellyn

Gymnast

Ruth Flynn

Gymnast

Roberto Germains

Circus Ringmaster

Richard Graydon

Francisco The Fearless

The Hassani Troupe

Circus Performer

The Flying Cherokees

Circus Performer

Carol Richter

Circus Performer

Josef Richter

Circus Performer

Vera Fossett

Circus Performer

Shirley Fossett

Circus Performer

Barrie Winship

Circus Performer

Ravinder Singh Revett

Thug

Gurdial Sira

Thug

Michael Moor

Thug

Sven Surtees

Thug

Peter Edmund

Thug

Ray Charles

Thug

Talib Johnny

Thug

Eva Reuber-staier

Gertan Klauber

Crew

Rashid Abassi

Location Manager

Eric Allwright

Makeup

Del Baker

Stunts

Derek Ball

Sound

Mohini Banerjee

Production Assistant

Pat Banta

Stunts

Ken Barker

Sound Rerecording

Reginald A Barkshire

Production Controller

Sheila Barnes

Production Assistant

John Barry

Music; Music Director

John Barry

Song ("All Time High")

Peter Bennet

Location Manager

Dave Bickers

Stunt Coordinator

Maurice Binder

Main Title Design

Albert R. Broccoli

Producer

Tony Broccoli

Assistant Director

Joanna Brown

Other

Bill Burton

Stunt Supervisor

May Capsaskis

Production Assistant

Eleanor Chaudhuri

Other

Bob Collins

Additional Photography

Frank Connor

Stills

Rita Coolidge

Song Performer ("All Time High")

Ken Court

Additional Art Direction

Clive Curtis

Stunts

Peter Davies

Editor

Leslie Dear

Model Photography

Rande Deluca

Other

James Devis

Additional Photography

Jim Dowdall

Stunts

John Evans

Effects Supervisor 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

John Fenner

Art Direction

Ian Fleming

From Stories ("Octopussy" And "The Property Of A Lady")

Ian Fleming

Story By

Ian Fleming

Other

Dorothy Ford

Stunts

J W Fornof

Other

George Macdonald Fraser

Screenwriter

Don French

Assistant 2nd Unit Director (2nd Unit)

George Frost

Makeup Supervisor

Gerry Gavigan

Assistant 2nd Unit Director (2nd Unit)

Leonhard Gmur

Production Manager

Martin Grace

Stunt Supervisor

John Grover

Editor Supervisor

Shama Habibullah

Indian Production Supervisor

Hugh Harlow

Production Supervisor

Nick Hobbs

Stunts

Derek Holding

Sound Editor

Rick Holley

Other

Mike Hopkins

Sound Editor

Alan Hume

Dp/Cinematographer

Alan Hume

Director Of Photography

Jane Jenkins

Casting (United States)

Jazzer Jeyes

Stunts

Dave Jordan

Props

Remy Julienne

Other

Remy Julienne

Stunt Driving Arranger

Charles Juroe

Publicist

Peter Swords King

Makeup

Philip Kohler

Production Manager

Clay Lacy

Other

Michael Lamont

Additional Art Direction

Peter Lamont

Production Designer

Jean-pierre Lelong

Sound Effects

Gerry Levy

Production Manager

Jake Lombard

Other

Jack Lowin

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Terry Madden

Assistant Director

Richard Maibaum

Screenwriter

Gordon Mccullum

Sound Rerecording

Debbie Mcwilliams

Casting

Wayne Michaels

Stunts

Colin Miller

Sound Editor

Alec Mills

Camera Operator

Tiny Nicholls

Costume Supervisor

Monty Norman

Music ("James Bond Theme")

David Nowell

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Barrie M. Osborne

Production Manager

Dan Peterson

Stunt Coordinator

Tom Pevsner

Associate Producer

Emma Porteous

Costume Designer

Sir Tim Rice

Lyrics ("All Time High")

John Richards

Sound Recording (Music)

Henry Richardson

Editor

John Richardson

Special Effects Supervisor

Peter Robb-king

Makeup

Iris Rose

Production Assistant

Crispian Sallis

Set Dresser (India)

Jan Schlubach

Additional Art Direction

Elaine Schreyeck

Script Supervisor

Baba Shaikh

Additional Assistant Director

Bobby Simmons

Action Arranger

Ernest F. Smith

Scenic Artist

Brian Smithies

Model Effects Supervisor

Charles Staffell

Other

Jacqueline Stears

Scenic Artist

Mary Stellar

Other

Jack Stephens

Set Decorator

Christopher Taylor

Hairstyles

Rocky Taylor

Stunts

Mike Turk

Other

Joyce Turner

Production Assistant

Malcolm Vinson

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Andrew Warren

Assistant Director

Anthony Waye

Assistant Director

Malcolm Weaver

Stunts

Chris Webb

Stunts

Bill Weston

Stunts

Paul Weston

Stunt Supervisor

Paul Weston

Stunts

George Whitear

Stills

Michael G. Wilson

Executive Producer

Michael G. Wilson

Screenwriter

Arthur Wooster

Camera Operator 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

R J Worth

Other

Philip Wrestler

Aerial Team Director

Ram Yedekar

Additional Art Direction

Michael Zimbrich

Assistant Director

Film Details

Also Known As
Bond - Octopussy
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Spy
Adaptation
Release Date
1983
Production Company
Eon Productions; United Artists Films
Distribution Company
MGM Distribution Company; MGM Home Entertainment; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; United International Pictures
Location
Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 11m

Articles

Octopussy


By 1983, the James Bond franchise was in the midst of a bizarre year, as it featured two different versions of the iconic character. There was Roger Moore in Octopussy, the 13th official entry in the film series (Moore's sixth), and then Sean Connery's return in Never Say Never Again, an offshoot made possible after a lengthy legal battle over the rights to Thunderball (1965). Thus, the stage was set for competing and rapidly aging Bonds. At its year of release, Moore was 56 and Connery was 53, proving that it was past time to hand down the role to a younger generation. Octopussy was the winner at the box office, and though it will never top any Bond rankings, it has plenty of compensatory pleasures, from its production design to its ambitious action sequences.

Octopussy took its name from Ian Fleming's short story collection Octopussy and the Living Daylights (1966), though the screenplay by George MacDonald Fraser, Michael G. Wilson and Richard Maibaum is largely original. Fraser, who had gained success with the Flashman adventure novels, wrote the first pass. According to his memoir The Light's On at Signpost, he asked producer Albert "Cubby" Broccoli to list all the locations Bond had already visited. They agreed upon India as the main locale he had yet to explore, joining a group of British productions dealing with colonial subjects, such as Gandhi (1982), Heat and Dust (1983), A Passage to India (1984) and TV productions like HBO's The Far Pavilions (1984) and ITV's The Jewel in the Crown (1984). Unlike those however, Octopussy has no interest in reckoning with Britain's colonial legacy; instead it's an opportunity for some Bondian tourism - lush hotels, beautiful women, exotic exteriors. As James Chapman writes in Licence to Thrill, Octopussy is set in a present where Anglo-Indian relations are uncomplicated by racial or political problems.

Bond ends up in India because he is tracking the movements of an exiled Afghan prince named Kamal Khan (Louis Jourdan) and his henchwoman Magda (Kristina Wayborn). It's a complicated business involving a Faberge egg, a dead agent in a clown costume and the re-nuclearization of Russia via a mad general named Orlov (Steven Berkoff). All of these lines connect back to the titular Octopussy (Maud Adams), a circus owner and jewel smuggler who lives on an island solely populated by beautiful women, which Bond oh so reluctantly sneaks onto. Production designer Peter Lamont took the already-stunning Taj Lake Palace and embroidered a matriarchal society out of it that incorporates octopus details into every room, including Octopussy's brass cephalopod bed.

He gets in via a crocodile submarine, with Roger Moore's head popping out of the back of the fake croc's throat with all the subtlety of a stripper popping out of a cake. It's a preposterously silly bit of tech that could only make sense in the Bond universe. It's representative of the clashing tones of the film, which veers from Bond wearing clown and gorilla suits to somberly debating the merits of denuclearization. It seems to be aiming for the more serious tone of the most recent bond, For Your Eyes Only (1981), but can't fully shake the goofiness of Moonraker (1979).

Moore had settled into the role by now, a savvy underplayer who never dominates a scene. But it's clear and understandable that the physical demands of the job are beyond him at this stage of his life. Even the punches look like a struggle. Director John Glen and his production team do a fine job of cutting around him though, pulling off some invigorating action setpieces, including the pre-credit opener in which Moore pilots a microjet through an airplane hangar to evade a missile bearing down on him. In DGA Quarterly Jeffrey Ressner interviewed Glen about this sequence - "We shot Roger in the Bede jet at Pine-wood with a sky backing and smoke blowing through a wind machine, with the camera on tracks zooming in and out to make it more realistic. We didn't have computer effects, so everything was smoke and mirrors. We frequently used these moving backings, which were very much lo-tech." Add in some fireworks, exploding miniatures and precise stunt driving, and a spectacular sequence came into being. Glen's experience as an editor surely helped him in conceiving and storyboarding these sequences, which are the main reason Octopussy is still worth seeing today.

By R. Emmet Sweeney
Octopussy

Octopussy

By 1983, the James Bond franchise was in the midst of a bizarre year, as it featured two different versions of the iconic character. There was Roger Moore in Octopussy, the 13th official entry in the film series (Moore's sixth), and then Sean Connery's return in Never Say Never Again, an offshoot made possible after a lengthy legal battle over the rights to Thunderball (1965). Thus, the stage was set for competing and rapidly aging Bonds. At its year of release, Moore was 56 and Connery was 53, proving that it was past time to hand down the role to a younger generation. Octopussy was the winner at the box office, and though it will never top any Bond rankings, it has plenty of compensatory pleasures, from its production design to its ambitious action sequences. Octopussy took its name from Ian Fleming's short story collection Octopussy and the Living Daylights (1966), though the screenplay by George MacDonald Fraser, Michael G. Wilson and Richard Maibaum is largely original. Fraser, who had gained success with the Flashman adventure novels, wrote the first pass. According to his memoir The Light's On at Signpost, he asked producer Albert "Cubby" Broccoli to list all the locations Bond had already visited. They agreed upon India as the main locale he had yet to explore, joining a group of British productions dealing with colonial subjects, such as Gandhi (1982), Heat and Dust (1983), A Passage to India (1984) and TV productions like HBO's The Far Pavilions (1984) and ITV's The Jewel in the Crown (1984). Unlike those however, Octopussy has no interest in reckoning with Britain's colonial legacy; instead it's an opportunity for some Bondian tourism - lush hotels, beautiful women, exotic exteriors. As James Chapman writes in Licence to Thrill, Octopussy is set in a present where Anglo-Indian relations are uncomplicated by racial or political problems. Bond ends up in India because he is tracking the movements of an exiled Afghan prince named Kamal Khan (Louis Jourdan) and his henchwoman Magda (Kristina Wayborn). It's a complicated business involving a Faberge egg, a dead agent in a clown costume and the re-nuclearization of Russia via a mad general named Orlov (Steven Berkoff). All of these lines connect back to the titular Octopussy (Maud Adams), a circus owner and jewel smuggler who lives on an island solely populated by beautiful women, which Bond oh so reluctantly sneaks onto. Production designer Peter Lamont took the already-stunning Taj Lake Palace and embroidered a matriarchal society out of it that incorporates octopus details into every room, including Octopussy's brass cephalopod bed. He gets in via a crocodile submarine, with Roger Moore's head popping out of the back of the fake croc's throat with all the subtlety of a stripper popping out of a cake. It's a preposterously silly bit of tech that could only make sense in the Bond universe. It's representative of the clashing tones of the film, which veers from Bond wearing clown and gorilla suits to somberly debating the merits of denuclearization. It seems to be aiming for the more serious tone of the most recent bond, For Your Eyes Only (1981), but can't fully shake the goofiness of Moonraker (1979). Moore had settled into the role by now, a savvy underplayer who never dominates a scene. But it's clear and understandable that the physical demands of the job are beyond him at this stage of his life. Even the punches look like a struggle. Director John Glen and his production team do a fine job of cutting around him though, pulling off some invigorating action setpieces, including the pre-credit opener in which Moore pilots a microjet through an airplane hangar to evade a missile bearing down on him. In DGA Quarterly Jeffrey Ressner interviewed Glen about this sequence - "We shot Roger in the Bede jet at Pine-wood with a sky backing and smoke blowing through a wind machine, with the camera on tracks zooming in and out to make it more realistic. We didn't have computer effects, so everything was smoke and mirrors. We frequently used these moving backings, which were very much lo-tech." Add in some fireworks, exploding miniatures and precise stunt driving, and a spectacular sequence came into being. Glen's experience as an editor surely helped him in conceiving and storyboarding these sequences, which are the main reason Octopussy is still worth seeing today. By R. Emmet Sweeney

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 10, 1983

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States Summer June 10, 1983