Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter


1h 35m 1968
Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter

Brief Synopsis

Herman's Hermits travel to England for a high-stakes greyhound race.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Release Date
Jan 1968
Premiere Information
Detroit opening: 12 Jun 1968
Production Company
Ivorygate Films; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures
Distribution Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
Great Britain
Location
England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

When 20-year-old Herman Tulley inherits his grandfather's most prized possession, a greyhound named Mrs. Brown, he and his friends (Barry, Keith, Karl, and Derek) decide to make their fortune racing the dog. After the animal has won the Manchester heat of the National Greyhound Derby, Herman meets wealthy Londoners Mr. and Mrs. Brown and their daughter Judy, a model. Hoping to see Judy again, Herman and his pop-singing friends decide to take the dog to London for the derby finals. Once there, however, they are swindled by a con man who takes all their money. Fortunately, the Honorable Percy Sutton, a good-natured tramp whom Herman once befriended in Manchester, appears and finds them beds for the night. The following day Mr. Brown gets them jobs as fruit-peddlers. Judy, who is attracted to Herman, invites them to a party, where they are offered a nightclub engagement. The next day, Herman's greyhound wins the preliminary heat of the London Derby. But Herman's enthusiasm turns to gloom when Judy goes to Rome for a 6-week modeling assignment, and the greyhound disappears at the station. After a futile search, Herman and his friends return to Manchester. Herman's spirits pick up when Percy arrives with the lost dog, and Herman discovers that his tomboy neighbor Tulip has become a very attractive woman. When Herman's dog gives birth to a mongrel pup, Herman and his friends give the pup to Judy's mother, the other Mrs. Brown.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Musical
Release Date
Jan 1968
Premiere Information
Detroit opening: 12 Jun 1968
Production Company
Ivorygate Films; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures
Distribution Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
Great Britain
Location
England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter


The popular 1960s British pop group Herman's Hermits star as a struggling pop band in their third film together, Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter (1968), a title taken from the group's first number-one single that topped the Billboard music charts in 1965. Lead singer Peter Noone (aka Herman) heads up the cast in this good-natured musical comedy supported by the Hermits: Karl Green on bass, Barry Whitwam on drums, and Keith Hopwood and Derek Leckenby on guitar. Mrs. Brown is the name of a racing dog that the band inherits. The Hermits travel from Manchester, England, to London playing gigs to finance Mrs. Brown's racing competition fees. Meanwhile, girl-next-door Tulip (Sheila White) is in love with Herman, but he is oblivious to her crush. When the group meets a wealthy family in London also named Brown, Herman falls hard for their lovely daughter Judy (Sarah Caldwell). Between the romantic triangle and the musical numbers, the band also meets a shady con artist and loses the dog in this lightweight romantic comedy.

Herman's Hermits was one of the many British import bands to arrive in America on the coattails of the Beatles, and one of the very few that also found success. Having to follow in those footsteps, it's no wonder that Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter has the feel of a Fab Four movie like A Hard Day's Night (1964) or Help! (1965). After all, it was produced by Allan Klein, a former business associate of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. In the days before music videos, films like these helped promote the bands and capitalized on their recording success.

Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter highlights some of the group's catchy pop tunes like "There's a Kind of Hush," "The Most Beautiful Thing in My Life" and the title track, which was re-recorded for the film's soundtrack to give it new life. It originally appeared on their early album Introducing Herman's Hermits. Mrs. Brown was produced by rock and roll manager Allen V. Klein and directed by Saul Swimmer, who later made such other films as Cometogether (1971), The Concert for Bangladesh (1972) and We Will Rock You: Queen Live in Concert (1982).

Having garnered some acting experience on the popular British soap opera Coronation Street before joining the Hermits, Peter Noone admirably leads the cast of mostly non-actors. Some more seasoned performers lend extra support to the young cast in Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter, including Stanley Holloway and Mona Washbourne as Mr. and Mrs. Brown, the parents of his beloved Judy.

Producer: Allan Klein, David W. Orton
Director: Saul Swimmer
Screenplay: Thaddeus Vane
Cinematography: Jack Hildyard
Editing: Tristam Cones
Art Direction: George Provis
Music: Ron Goodwin, Graham Gouldman, Trevor Peacock, Geoff Stephens, Kenny Young
Cast: Peter Noone (Herman), Karl Green (Karl), Keith Hopwood (Keith), Derek Leckenby (Derek), Barry Whitwam (Barry), Stanley Holloway (Mr. Brown), Mona Washbourne (Mrs. Brown), Lance Percival (Percy Sutton), Marjorie Rhodes (Gloria Tulley).
C-96m. Letterboxed.

by Andrea Foshee
Mrs. Brown, You've Got A Lovely Daughter

Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter

The popular 1960s British pop group Herman's Hermits star as a struggling pop band in their third film together, Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter (1968), a title taken from the group's first number-one single that topped the Billboard music charts in 1965. Lead singer Peter Noone (aka Herman) heads up the cast in this good-natured musical comedy supported by the Hermits: Karl Green on bass, Barry Whitwam on drums, and Keith Hopwood and Derek Leckenby on guitar. Mrs. Brown is the name of a racing dog that the band inherits. The Hermits travel from Manchester, England, to London playing gigs to finance Mrs. Brown's racing competition fees. Meanwhile, girl-next-door Tulip (Sheila White) is in love with Herman, but he is oblivious to her crush. When the group meets a wealthy family in London also named Brown, Herman falls hard for their lovely daughter Judy (Sarah Caldwell). Between the romantic triangle and the musical numbers, the band also meets a shady con artist and loses the dog in this lightweight romantic comedy. Herman's Hermits was one of the many British import bands to arrive in America on the coattails of the Beatles, and one of the very few that also found success. Having to follow in those footsteps, it's no wonder that Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter has the feel of a Fab Four movie like A Hard Day's Night (1964) or Help! (1965). After all, it was produced by Allan Klein, a former business associate of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. In the days before music videos, films like these helped promote the bands and capitalized on their recording success. Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter highlights some of the group's catchy pop tunes like "There's a Kind of Hush," "The Most Beautiful Thing in My Life" and the title track, which was re-recorded for the film's soundtrack to give it new life. It originally appeared on their early album Introducing Herman's Hermits. Mrs. Brown was produced by rock and roll manager Allen V. Klein and directed by Saul Swimmer, who later made such other films as Cometogether (1971), The Concert for Bangladesh (1972) and We Will Rock You: Queen Live in Concert (1982). Having garnered some acting experience on the popular British soap opera Coronation Street before joining the Hermits, Peter Noone admirably leads the cast of mostly non-actors. Some more seasoned performers lend extra support to the young cast in Mrs. Brown, You've Got a Lovely Daughter, including Stanley Holloway and Mona Washbourne as Mr. and Mrs. Brown, the parents of his beloved Judy. Producer: Allan Klein, David W. Orton Director: Saul Swimmer Screenplay: Thaddeus Vane Cinematography: Jack Hildyard Editing: Tristam Cones Art Direction: George Provis Music: Ron Goodwin, Graham Gouldman, Trevor Peacock, Geoff Stephens, Kenny Young Cast: Peter Noone (Herman), Karl Green (Karl), Keith Hopwood (Keith), Derek Leckenby (Derek), Barry Whitwam (Barry), Stanley Holloway (Mr. Brown), Mona Washbourne (Mrs. Brown), Lance Percival (Percy Sutton), Marjorie Rhodes (Gloria Tulley). C-96m. Letterboxed. by Andrea Foshee

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Opened in London in September 1968.

Miscellaneous Notes

CinemaScope