All the Young Men


1h 27m 1960
All the Young Men

Brief Synopsis

A black sergeant is forced to take command when his lieutenant is killed during the Korean War.

Film Details

Also Known As
All the Fine Young Men
Genre
Drama
War
Release Date
Sep 1960
Premiere Information
New York opening: 26 Aug 1960; Los Angeles opening: 7 Sep 1960
Production Company
Hall Bartlett Productions, Inc.; Jaguar Productions, Inc.; Ladd Enterprises, Inc.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Glacier National Park, Montana, United States; Mt. Hood, Oregon, United States; St. Mary's, Montana, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Film Length
7,740ft (10 reels)

Synopsis

In October 1950, shortly after U.S. forces invade Korea, an advance Marine unit is sent to find and hold a farmhouse that is situated in a strategic mountain pass. As the Marines make their way down a snow-covered mountainside, they are attacked by waiting Chinese troops. Just before he dies, Lt. Earl D. Toland orders Sgt. Eddie Towler, the unit's only black man, to take charge of the few surviving Marines, even though Towler suggests that Sgt. Kincaid, a veteran who has been with the outfit for eleven years, is better prepared to direct the unit. Towler guides the men across the slippery, heavily mined slopes, and during the trek, Kincaid rescues one of the men when he slips and lands among the mines. As they reach the farmhouse, one of the men panics and throws a grenade inside the courtyard walls, seriously injuring a Korean woman who lives there with her part-French daughter and grandson. Once inside, the men begin to worry that the numerous Chinese troops in the area will kill them all before the advancing Marine battalion can reach them, but Towler orders the men to hold their position at all costs. Bracken, a Southern bigot, claims that black men are unsuited to be leaders. Kincaid, who thinks the men should be moved even though it would mean losing the pass to the enemy and thereby endangering their entire battalion, suggests that Towler wants to remain in the farmhouse merely to prove himself. Determined to carry out Toland's commands, Towler claims that he will kill any man who refuses to act like a Marine and defend the farmhouse. That night, as Towler contemplates their difficult situation, the men reminisce about home. A recent immigrant from Sweden named Torgil, who wants to become a citizen and bring his family to the U.S., sings a song from his native land. Crane, a cynical corporal, tells amusingly irreverent stories about high-ranking officers, and a young soldier named Cotton sings and accompanies himself on a Korean stringed instrument. Before long, an enemy patrol unit advances on the house and the shooting begins. The Marines repulse these troops, and Hunter, a Navajo from Arizona nicknamed "The Chief," volunteers to scout the area for other enemy soldiers. The Chinese capture Hunter and accompany him back to the farmhouse. To save his unit, Hunter refrains from giving the password and dies with his Chinese captors when Towler and Kincaid fire on the intruders. After Hunter's burial, the Eurasian woman living in the house thanks Towler for helping her, telling him that one day, his color will make no difference to the others. Bracken gets drunk and attacks the woman, whereupon Towler fights him and, after enduring Bracken's racist insults and epithets, threatens to kill him if he touches the woman again. After another battle with Chinese troops that costs the life of one of the men, Towler and Kincaid come to blows, but their fight is interrupted by the sound of an approaching tank. Towler and Kincaid sneak onto the tank and set it ablaze, but Kincaid's leg is crushed as he tries to get out of the way, and it must be amputated by the medic, who is unsure of his ability. Encouraged by Towler, the medic continues with the operation, and Towler donates his own blood to keep Kincaid alive despite Bracken's objections. As a line of Chinese tanks approaches, Towler orders the Marines to safer ground and protects Kincaid during an explosion, then carries him out of the farmhouse. The enemy is about to reach the two men when U.S. planes appear overhead and blast the Chinese troops. Greatly relieved, Towler and Kincaid wish each other a merry Christmas.

Film Details

Also Known As
All the Fine Young Men
Genre
Drama
War
Release Date
Sep 1960
Premiere Information
New York opening: 26 Aug 1960; Los Angeles opening: 7 Sep 1960
Production Company
Hall Bartlett Productions, Inc.; Jaguar Productions, Inc.; Ladd Enterprises, Inc.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Glacier National Park, Montana, United States; Mt. Hood, Oregon, United States; St. Mary's, Montana, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 27m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Film Length
7,740ft (10 reels)

Articles

All the Young Men


The Korean War never became a popular subject for Hollywood probably because the conflict has always been shrouded in gray. Never officially declared a war, the event was termed a conflict or "a police action" with no black-and-white lines to be drawn and no clear-cut enemy to be defeated. Instead, the goal was for a negotiated settlement, which was not conducive to rousing drama.

At the beginning of the war, Hollywood rushed a couple of films into production, falling back on the conventions of the World War II film. Samuel Fuller's The Steel Helmet (1951), the first film about Korea to be released, featured a platoon of diverse types representing different ethnic groups who bravely tackle their almost impossible assignment. Fuller attempted to portray the madness of war to offer a less simplistic view of combat than in most World War II films, but Steel Helmet's short shooting schedule and low budget exposed the backlot look, undermining any efforts at gritty realism. As the Korean War progressed, revealing the lack of clarity regarding its purpose or goal, a pessimism seeped into the few films produced about the conflict, including Retreat, Hell! (1952) and The Bridges at Toko-Ri (1954). The former may be the first war drama to visualize American troops in retreat, while the latter focuses on the futility of war. Yet, the films never depicted the soldiers as anything less than courageous and determined to do their duty no matter how pessimistic the tone. Any criticism of the war was aimed at the politicians, not the military. After the Panmunjom truce (not a treaty) was signed in July 1953, Hollywood showed little interest in the Korean Conflict, undoubtedly because the situation ended in a frustrating stalemate, whereas after WWII, the film industry had revisited that war over and over.

With a few notable exceptions, Hollywood consistently portrayed the military in a positive light until the early 1960s. Around this time, a few war dramas about the Korean War resurfaced, using that war to criticize U.S. policy or to comment on social institutions. Pork Chop Hill, released in 1959, was based on an actual battle that was fought during the final hours of the truce negotiations. It was staged to demonstrate to the Communists that the United States was willing to continue fighting even if an agreement was not reached. When the truce was signed, it rendered the sacrifices of the American G.I.s who fought to take Pork Chop Hill meaningless. As directed by Lewis Milestone (All Quiet on the Western Front, 1930) and produced Sy Bartlett (The Outsider, 1961), the film version of the battle was intended as an antiwar statement. However, in depicting the soldiers as courageous and dedicated heroes in the faces of a futile, politically motivated mission, Pork Chop Hill suffered from conflicting messages. Many viewers and critics saw little difference between it and previous Korean War dramas that had lauded the military but criticized politicians.

The following year, All the Young Men (1960) offered a less romanticized view of the American G.I. in a story that is set during the Korean War but is not really about the war. Instead, All the Young Men uses the war genre to take a stand on racial integration.

Sidney Poitier stars as Sgt. Eddie Towler, who is part of an advance Marine unit assigned to find and secure a farm located in a strategic mountain pass. When the unit is ambushed by Chinese troops, casualties are high, with the officer in charge mortally wounded. Before he dies, he leaves Sgt. Towler-the unit's only African American-in charge of the few survivors, though Sgt. Kincaid, played by Alan Ladd, has more military experience. Once the depleted unit reaches the farmhouse, Towler orders the men to hold their position until an advancing battalion reaches them, a mission made more difficult by marauding Chinese troops and Sgt. Kincaid's objections to the plan. The tension escalates when Pvt. Bracken, a Southern bigot played by Paul Richards, taunts Sgt. Towler, makes trouble among the restless men, and tries to sexually assault one of the women in the farmhouse. A final push by the enemy rips into the unit, allowing Towler to prove himself as a capable and courageous leader.

All the Young Men serves as a pro-integration statement at a time when integration had yet to be fully achieved. Its message was not only timely but controversial. While the film was in post-production in February 1960, four black college students walked into a drugstore in Greensboro, North Carolina, and sat down at the whites-only lunch counter. The waitress refused to serve them, though the manager did not force them to leave. The next day, 20 more black students joined them. Two days after that, white students from a nearby women's college arrived to become part of this historic sit-in. The incident sparked a move to integrate lunch counters across a very tense South. Later in the year, sit-ins at department stores and bus terminals continued the drive toward full integration, while President Dwight Eisenhower passed the Civil Rights Act of 1960 in May amidst much criticism from certain sectors of the country.

Like his mentor Stanley Kramer, producer-director Hall Bartlett had a strong social conscience, and he wanted to produce a film that reflected his ideals. Just as Kramer's The Defiant Ones (1958) presented a pro-integration message in the form of an action drama to avoid being overtly preachy, so Bartlett decided on a war film to do the same, setting the story during the Korean War, the first military action to use integrated fighting units. By showing Sgt. Towler to be a good leader during the heat of battle, the moral center of a military unit with less-than-admirable members, and a courageous soldier willing to sacrifice his life for another, All the Young Men presents a strong argument for the value of integration. The point is underscored in a scene in which Towler gives his blood to Kincaid in a transfusion, which saves his life-with the fusion of blood as the ultimate symbol of the value of integration.

Sidney Poitier worked constantly during the late 1950s and early 1960s, peaking as a movie star with In the Heat of the Night in 1967. Given his status as Hollywood's only black star at the time, Poitier was in great demand. Bartlett wrote the script for him, offering him $100,000 and a cut of the profits, but he had to wait until his star completed a historic run on Broadway in A Raisin in the Sun before shooting could begin. Though individual figures like Kramer and Bartlett were using popular film to fight social ills, Hollywood as an industry was far less enlightened. Finding a studio to release All the Young Men proved difficult, with Columbia the only studio willing to put up a portion of money for financing and distribution. However, Columbia wanted Bartlett to build up a costarring role for a white actor, because they were afraid to bank on Poitier alone to carry the film. The producer-director agreed, expanding the character of Sgt. Kincaid. Finding a star to accept the role of Kincaid proved more difficult than Bartlett anticipated, perhaps because actors feared their appeal to Southern audiences would suffer if they starred in a pro-integration drama. Jeffrey Hunter and Stuart Whitman were among those who turned down the role before an ailing, depressed Alan Ladd agreed to costar and coproduce through his Jaguar Productions. Three and a half years later, Ladd would die after taking a combination of liquor and sedatives.

The rest of the cast of All the Young Men consisted of a diverse group of actors playing a melting-pot of a military unit. This is both a convention and a strength of the classic war drama. Teen heartthrob James Darren plays a naïve young soldier who sings while the unit is holed up in the farmhouse; Mario Alcalde portrays a Native American who sacrifices himself for the sake of his fellow soldiers; boxer Ingemar Johansson shows off his physique as the immigrant soldier who wants to do his part for his adopted country; and comic Mort Sahl adds comic relief with his one-liners and wisecracks, most of which he wrote himself. The twist to this convention in All the Young Men is Bracken (Paul Richards), who, instead of being the Southern farm boy or colorful character from Dixie, is a hate-mongering bigot-definitely not a positive reflection of the military as an institution.

Columbia mounted two different ad campaigns for All the Young Men, one for white audiences and one for African Americans. Black publicists were hired to target African American newspapers, radio stations, theaters, and social organizations. Exhibitors in the North and West declared this ad campaign, which exploited the image of a black star defying a white star, to be a success. The poster for the black campaign showed Poitier gripping Ladd by the collar, along with the line, "Spit out what's on your filthy little mind and then take your orders from me." Interestingly, that bit of dialogue does not exist in the movie, nor is Ladd's character the bigoted villain.

Producers: Hall Bartlett, Alan Ladd, and Newton Arnold for Jaguar Productions
Director: Hall Bartlett
Screenplay: Hall Bartlett
Cinematography: Daniel Fapp
Editor: Al Clark
Art Director: Carl Anderson and Bud Brooks
Music: George Duning
Costume Designer: Ted Tetrich, Gordon Dawson, and Edna Taylor
Cast: Sgt. Eddie Towler (Sidney Poitier), Sgt. Kincaid (Alan Ladd), Cotton (James Darren), Wade (Glenn Corbett), Corp. Crane (Mort Sahl), Maya (Ana St. Clair), Bracken (Paul Richards), Casey (Dick Davalos), Hunter, "the Chief" (Mario Alcalde), Torgil (Ingemar Johansson), Lt. Earl D. Toland (Charles Quinlivan).
BW-90m.

by Susan Doll
All The Young Men

All the Young Men

The Korean War never became a popular subject for Hollywood probably because the conflict has always been shrouded in gray. Never officially declared a war, the event was termed a conflict or "a police action" with no black-and-white lines to be drawn and no clear-cut enemy to be defeated. Instead, the goal was for a negotiated settlement, which was not conducive to rousing drama. At the beginning of the war, Hollywood rushed a couple of films into production, falling back on the conventions of the World War II film. Samuel Fuller's The Steel Helmet (1951), the first film about Korea to be released, featured a platoon of diverse types representing different ethnic groups who bravely tackle their almost impossible assignment. Fuller attempted to portray the madness of war to offer a less simplistic view of combat than in most World War II films, but Steel Helmet's short shooting schedule and low budget exposed the backlot look, undermining any efforts at gritty realism. As the Korean War progressed, revealing the lack of clarity regarding its purpose or goal, a pessimism seeped into the few films produced about the conflict, including Retreat, Hell! (1952) and The Bridges at Toko-Ri (1954). The former may be the first war drama to visualize American troops in retreat, while the latter focuses on the futility of war. Yet, the films never depicted the soldiers as anything less than courageous and determined to do their duty no matter how pessimistic the tone. Any criticism of the war was aimed at the politicians, not the military. After the Panmunjom truce (not a treaty) was signed in July 1953, Hollywood showed little interest in the Korean Conflict, undoubtedly because the situation ended in a frustrating stalemate, whereas after WWII, the film industry had revisited that war over and over. With a few notable exceptions, Hollywood consistently portrayed the military in a positive light until the early 1960s. Around this time, a few war dramas about the Korean War resurfaced, using that war to criticize U.S. policy or to comment on social institutions. Pork Chop Hill, released in 1959, was based on an actual battle that was fought during the final hours of the truce negotiations. It was staged to demonstrate to the Communists that the United States was willing to continue fighting even if an agreement was not reached. When the truce was signed, it rendered the sacrifices of the American G.I.s who fought to take Pork Chop Hill meaningless. As directed by Lewis Milestone (All Quiet on the Western Front, 1930) and produced Sy Bartlett (The Outsider, 1961), the film version of the battle was intended as an antiwar statement. However, in depicting the soldiers as courageous and dedicated heroes in the faces of a futile, politically motivated mission, Pork Chop Hill suffered from conflicting messages. Many viewers and critics saw little difference between it and previous Korean War dramas that had lauded the military but criticized politicians. The following year, All the Young Men (1960) offered a less romanticized view of the American G.I. in a story that is set during the Korean War but is not really about the war. Instead, All the Young Men uses the war genre to take a stand on racial integration. Sidney Poitier stars as Sgt. Eddie Towler, who is part of an advance Marine unit assigned to find and secure a farm located in a strategic mountain pass. When the unit is ambushed by Chinese troops, casualties are high, with the officer in charge mortally wounded. Before he dies, he leaves Sgt. Towler-the unit's only African American-in charge of the few survivors, though Sgt. Kincaid, played by Alan Ladd, has more military experience. Once the depleted unit reaches the farmhouse, Towler orders the men to hold their position until an advancing battalion reaches them, a mission made more difficult by marauding Chinese troops and Sgt. Kincaid's objections to the plan. The tension escalates when Pvt. Bracken, a Southern bigot played by Paul Richards, taunts Sgt. Towler, makes trouble among the restless men, and tries to sexually assault one of the women in the farmhouse. A final push by the enemy rips into the unit, allowing Towler to prove himself as a capable and courageous leader. All the Young Men serves as a pro-integration statement at a time when integration had yet to be fully achieved. Its message was not only timely but controversial. While the film was in post-production in February 1960, four black college students walked into a drugstore in Greensboro, North Carolina, and sat down at the whites-only lunch counter. The waitress refused to serve them, though the manager did not force them to leave. The next day, 20 more black students joined them. Two days after that, white students from a nearby women's college arrived to become part of this historic sit-in. The incident sparked a move to integrate lunch counters across a very tense South. Later in the year, sit-ins at department stores and bus terminals continued the drive toward full integration, while President Dwight Eisenhower passed the Civil Rights Act of 1960 in May amidst much criticism from certain sectors of the country. Like his mentor Stanley Kramer, producer-director Hall Bartlett had a strong social conscience, and he wanted to produce a film that reflected his ideals. Just as Kramer's The Defiant Ones (1958) presented a pro-integration message in the form of an action drama to avoid being overtly preachy, so Bartlett decided on a war film to do the same, setting the story during the Korean War, the first military action to use integrated fighting units. By showing Sgt. Towler to be a good leader during the heat of battle, the moral center of a military unit with less-than-admirable members, and a courageous soldier willing to sacrifice his life for another, All the Young Men presents a strong argument for the value of integration. The point is underscored in a scene in which Towler gives his blood to Kincaid in a transfusion, which saves his life-with the fusion of blood as the ultimate symbol of the value of integration. Sidney Poitier worked constantly during the late 1950s and early 1960s, peaking as a movie star with In the Heat of the Night in 1967. Given his status as Hollywood's only black star at the time, Poitier was in great demand. Bartlett wrote the script for him, offering him $100,000 and a cut of the profits, but he had to wait until his star completed a historic run on Broadway in A Raisin in the Sun before shooting could begin. Though individual figures like Kramer and Bartlett were using popular film to fight social ills, Hollywood as an industry was far less enlightened. Finding a studio to release All the Young Men proved difficult, with Columbia the only studio willing to put up a portion of money for financing and distribution. However, Columbia wanted Bartlett to build up a costarring role for a white actor, because they were afraid to bank on Poitier alone to carry the film. The producer-director agreed, expanding the character of Sgt. Kincaid. Finding a star to accept the role of Kincaid proved more difficult than Bartlett anticipated, perhaps because actors feared their appeal to Southern audiences would suffer if they starred in a pro-integration drama. Jeffrey Hunter and Stuart Whitman were among those who turned down the role before an ailing, depressed Alan Ladd agreed to costar and coproduce through his Jaguar Productions. Three and a half years later, Ladd would die after taking a combination of liquor and sedatives. The rest of the cast of All the Young Men consisted of a diverse group of actors playing a melting-pot of a military unit. This is both a convention and a strength of the classic war drama. Teen heartthrob James Darren plays a naïve young soldier who sings while the unit is holed up in the farmhouse; Mario Alcalde portrays a Native American who sacrifices himself for the sake of his fellow soldiers; boxer Ingemar Johansson shows off his physique as the immigrant soldier who wants to do his part for his adopted country; and comic Mort Sahl adds comic relief with his one-liners and wisecracks, most of which he wrote himself. The twist to this convention in All the Young Men is Bracken (Paul Richards), who, instead of being the Southern farm boy or colorful character from Dixie, is a hate-mongering bigot-definitely not a positive reflection of the military as an institution. Columbia mounted two different ad campaigns for All the Young Men, one for white audiences and one for African Americans. Black publicists were hired to target African American newspapers, radio stations, theaters, and social organizations. Exhibitors in the North and West declared this ad campaign, which exploited the image of a black star defying a white star, to be a success. The poster for the black campaign showed Poitier gripping Ladd by the collar, along with the line, "Spit out what's on your filthy little mind and then take your orders from me." Interestingly, that bit of dialogue does not exist in the movie, nor is Ladd's character the bigoted villain. Producers: Hall Bartlett, Alan Ladd, and Newton Arnold for Jaguar Productions Director: Hall Bartlett Screenplay: Hall Bartlett Cinematography: Daniel Fapp Editor: Al Clark Art Director: Carl Anderson and Bud Brooks Music: George Duning Costume Designer: Ted Tetrich, Gordon Dawson, and Edna Taylor Cast: Sgt. Eddie Towler (Sidney Poitier), Sgt. Kincaid (Alan Ladd), Cotton (James Darren), Wade (Glenn Corbett), Corp. Crane (Mort Sahl), Maya (Ana St. Clair), Bracken (Paul Richards), Casey (Dick Davalos), Hunter, "the Chief" (Mario Alcalde), Torgil (Ingemar Johansson), Lt. Earl D. Toland (Charles Quinlivan). BW-90m. by Susan Doll

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film's working title was All the Fine Young Men. The opening cast credits differ from the end credits: In the opening credits, Alan Ladd and Sidney Poitier are listed first, above the title, and are followed by James Darren, Glen Corbett and the others. Ingemar Johansson is listed last in the opening credits. Onscreen credits note that exterior scenes were filmed at Montana's Glacier National Park through courtesy of the Dept. of the Interior.
       According to news items and an article about the production in American Cinematographer, a crew of seventy traveled to St. Mary's, MT, an Eastern gateway to Glacier National Park, seventeen miles from the Canadian border, but because of warm weather, fog, blizzard conditions and a gale that destroyed the Korean farmhouse set, filming was continued on a Hollywood sound stage covered with silicate to simulate snow. Later, the company moved to Mt. Hood, OR, where the weather caused further problems. The scene in which two Marines set fire to a tank was shot in a parking lot at a lodge to avoid having ski lifts appear in the frame. Because of delays, shooting was not completed until 54 days after it began, although the original schedule called for 28 days.
       According to news items, the start date of the production was determined by Sidney Poitier's schedule in the Broadway play A Raisin in the Sun; Poitier left the role to be in the film, then returned to the play following shooting. Although Hall Bartlett's onscreen credit reads "written, produced and directed by Hall Bartlett," a March 1959 Hollywood Reporter news item noted that the original story was to be written by Bartlett and Gene Coon. Coon's contribution to the story has not been verified, however. The news item added that Bartlett initially planned to produce the picture in partnership with John Champion, but later decided to make it as a solo venture. Jaguar Productions, Inc. was Alan Ladd's company, and Ladd Enterprises, Inc. was a co-copyright claimant. According to a Daily Variety news item, Jeffrey Hunter was sought for the co-starring role, and Stuart Whitman was also considered for a role, possibly for the same part. All the Young Men marked the screen debut and only American film role of Swedish world heavyweight boxing champion Ingemar Johansson.
       According to a Hollywood Reporter news item, topical comedian Mort Sahl's contract had "the unusual stipulation that Sahl write all his own dialogue....[Bartlett] handed Sahl the story outline and told him to put in his own words for his role." The Hollywood Reporter review noted, "Sahl's monologue on some of life's incongruities is deftly inserted and brightly played."
       According to the American Cinematographer article, director of photography Daniel Fapp "violated a theory of exposure long held by most photographers" and opened up one stop above the exposure indicated on his light meter when he shot snow scenes, rather than decreasing exposure one stop. Fapp also shot so as to use the sun's light as a cross-light or back-light, rather than the key source, for which he used arc booster lights. Fapp shot night sequences "day-for-night."
       According to letters in the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the PCA advised Bartlett and Columbia officials to drop the word "nigger" from the script; however, in the final film, the character "Bracken" uses the word in a verbal attack on "Towler." Many reviews commented that the picture presented a non-stereotypical portrayal of a black man.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 1960

Released in United States Summer August 1960