Goodbye Again


1h 5m 1933
Goodbye Again

Brief Synopsis

An author's reunion with an old flame angers the secretary who loves him.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adaptation
Release Date
Sep 9, 1933
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
First National Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
First National Pictures, Inc.; The Vitaphone Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Goodbye Again by George Haight and Allan Scott (New York, 28 Dec 1932).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

Anne Rogers is the secretary to Kenneth Bixby, the author of many best-selling novels. On a lecture tour, he meets Julie Wilson, an old girl friend, who believes that she is the inspiration for the heroine of Bixby's latest novel. Having heard about Bixby all during his marriage, Julie's husband Harvey hates him, even though he has never met him. Julie is determined to rekindle their romance, and while she entertains Bixby, Anne takes care of her outraged husband. Julie's younger sister Elizabeth and her stuffy fiancé, Arthur Westlake, are aware of Julie's intentions and are determined to prevent a scandal. After Bixby's rendezvous with Julie, Anne arranges to meet him on the night train, where she is joined by Harvey, Elizabeth and Arthur. Julie is also on the train, and in order to avoid Elizabeth, Harvey and Arthur, who are waiting in her compartment, she spends the night with Bixby. When Harvey hears this he decides to sue for divorce. Even though Bixby swears that nothing happened, Anne is jealous and washes her hands of the author. Bixby has no intention of marrying Julie and tries several ruses to discourage her. Finally, Anne gives in to Bixby's pleading and tells Julie that another woman was the model for the novel's main character. This information sends Julie back to her husband, and Bixby convinces Anne that she loves him and should take him back.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adaptation
Release Date
Sep 9, 1933
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
First National Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
First National Pictures, Inc.; The Vitaphone Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Goodbye Again by George Haight and Allan Scott (New York, 28 Dec 1932).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 5m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Articles

Goodbye Again


The suave and oily Warren William earned his sobriquet "The King Of Pre-Code" fair and square. Amoral, money-hungry, yet continental and charming, he embodied everything sensation-hungry audiences in the early days of the Depression wanted -- a rake to boo and hiss while thrilling at his naughty exploits. It was a foregone conclusion that he'd end up starring against Joan Blondell: he was the decadent capitalist, and she was the plucky, snappy survivor of all the Depression's troubles. Here, Blondell plays secretary to William's unscrupulous novelist, and it's up to her to soothe the furious ex-girlfriends and cuckolded husbands he leaves in his wake -- but not without coming out on top in the end. Made in one of Blondell's especially triumphant years at Warner Brothers, Goodbye Again gets overlooked because it's sandwiched in her resume between Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933) (also starring William) and Footlight Parade (1933), but it's a prime example of two talents triumphant in their time.
Goodbye Again

Goodbye Again

The suave and oily Warren William earned his sobriquet "The King Of Pre-Code" fair and square. Amoral, money-hungry, yet continental and charming, he embodied everything sensation-hungry audiences in the early days of the Depression wanted -- a rake to boo and hiss while thrilling at his naughty exploits. It was a foregone conclusion that he'd end up starring against Joan Blondell: he was the decadent capitalist, and she was the plucky, snappy survivor of all the Depression's troubles. Here, Blondell plays secretary to William's unscrupulous novelist, and it's up to her to soothe the furious ex-girlfriends and cuckolded husbands he leaves in his wake -- but not without coming out on top in the end. Made in one of Blondell's especially triumphant years at Warner Brothers, Goodbye Again gets overlooked because it's sandwiched in her resume between Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933) (also starring William) and Footlight Parade (1933), but it's a prime example of two talents triumphant in their time.

Quotes

Trivia

The original play opened in New York on 28 December 1928.

Notes

According to modern sources, Robert Florey was originally assigned to direct this picture. The film was remade by Warner Bros. in 1941 as Honeymoon for Three, starring George Brent, Osa Massen and Ann Sheridan and directed by Lloyd Bacon.