The Good Mother


1h 44m 1988

Brief Synopsis

A recently divorced woman faces problems when her attention becomes divided between her young daughter and a new man in her life.

Film Details

Also Known As
Good Mother, Le Prix de la passion, Prix de la passion, Le
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Massachusetts Film Office; Metrocolor; Ontario Film Development Corporation; Panavision, Ltd.; Silver Screen Partners Iv; Touchstone Pictures; Triad Music Inc; Walt Disney Company Studio Facilities
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; Southern Ontario, Canada; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m

Synopsis

A recently divorced woman faces problems when her attention becomes divided between her young daughter and a new man in her life.

Crew

Stuart Aikins

Casting (Toronto)

Wayne Allwine

Sound Effects Editor

Sharon Barnebey

Scenic Artist (Boston)

Daniel Barrett

Hairstyles

Ron Bartlett

Foley Editor

Susan Bay

Project Consultant

Susan Becker

Costume Designer

Michael J. Benavente

Sound Effects Editor

Suzanne Benoit

Makeup

Peter Berger

Editor

Elmer Bernstein

Music

Michael Bortman

Screenwriter

Alice D Bouvrie

2nd Assistant Director (Boston)

Ian Brock

Art Direction Assistant

Kim Chow

Costumer

Cyndie Clayton

Production Assistant

Alice Clift

Foley Artist

David Coatsworth

Unit Production Manager

Linda Corbin

Foley Mixer

David Crone

Camera Operator

Lynn D'angona

Production Assistant (Boston)

Stephen Dembitzer

Production Assistant (Boston)

Tracey A Doyle

Set Decorator Assistant

Kathy Durning

Music Editor Supervisor

Thom Ehle

Dolby Consultant

Tony Eldridge

Bestboy

Roy Elliston

Bestboy Grip

Noah Farrell

Dolly Grip

Anne-marie Ferney

3rd Assistant Director

Barry Fitzsimmons

Production Assistant (Boston)

Dorigen Fode

Location Manager Assistant

Joe Foley

Unit Production Manager (Boston)

Janet Frank

Piano Instructor (Diane Keaton)

Ken Fundus

Dolly Grip

Michael Gemelli

Makeup Assistant (Boston)

Ron Gillham

Key Grip

Arne Glimcher

Producer

Gerry Gorman

2nd Camera Assistant (Boston)

Anthony Greco

Set Decorator

Susan Greenway

Piano Coach

Robert Grimaldi

Hairstyles (Boston)

Richard Guinness

Key Grip (Boston)

Tim Guinness

Bestboy (Boston)

David Hacker

Sculptor

Warren Hamilton

Sound Effects Editor

Barbara Hanania

1st Camera Assistant (Boston)

Charles Harrington

Location Manager (Boston)

Richard St John Harrison

Art Direction

Mathew Hart

Location Manager

Daniel J. Heffner

1st Assistant Director

Stephen T Higgins

Props (Boston)

Chris Holmes

Gaffer

Sara Holmes

Production Assistant

David J Hudson

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Fred Ionson

Transportation Coordinator

Barry K Johnson

Production Assistant (Boston)

Stan Jolley

Production Designer

Roxanne Jones

Foley Editor

Joe Kelly

Assistance

Nicholas Kora

Adr Editor

Jim Lapidus

Costume Supervisor

David Lee

Sound Recording Mixer

Richard Lightstone

Sound Recording Mixer

Lisa Lovaas

Costumer

Tom Lucas

Makeup (Diane Keaton)

Penny Lucey

Wardrobe Assistant (Boston)

Grant Lucibello

Production Assistant

Tony Lucibello

1st Assistant Director

Angie Luckey

Sound Effects Editor Assistant

Ron Macmillan

Construction Coordinator

Susie Mah

Art Direction Assistant

Don Malouf

Sound Effects Editor

Mark Mangini

Sound Effects

Don Mcqueen

Set Decorator Assistant

Mara Mcsweeny

Production Coordinator

Mel Metcalfe

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Sue Miller

Source Material (From Novel)

Don Miloyevich

Property Master

Ian Nelmes

Scenic Artist

Billy O'brien

Transportation Coordinator (Boston)

Sharon O'dwyer

Production Coordinator

Andrew G Patterson

Sound Effects Editor

Greg Pelchat

Property Master Assistant

Sonny Pettijohn

Sound Effects Editor Assistant

Collinge Pickman

Casting (Boston)

Ronald Plant

Bestboy Grip (Boston)

Terry Porter

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Cynthia Quan

Production Accountant

Branko Racki

Stunt Coordinator

Anna Reinhardt

Assistant (To Arnold Glimcher)

Hilton Rosemarin

Art Direction

Joan Rowe

Foley Artist

Arthur Rowsell

Costume Supervisor

Ann Russell

Costumer

Thom Ryan

1st Assistant Camera Operator

Louis Sanft

Hairstyles (Boston)

Jay Scharer

Production Assistant (Boston)

Frank O Schulz

Gaffer (Boston)

Solange Schwalbe

Foley Editor

Ori Seron

Assistant (To Leonard Nimoy)

Barbara Shapiro

Casting

David Sheridan

2nd Assistant Camera Operator

Susan Shipton

Assistant Editor (Toronto)

Michael H Smith

Production Assistant

Erik Snyder

Production Assistant

Jim Solomon

Production Assistant (Boston)

Michael L Stone

2nd Camera Operator (Boston)

James L Thompson

Boom Operator

Matt Tundo

Camera Operator

Karen Vaughan

Production Coordinator (Boston)

George C Villasenor

Assistant Editor (Los Angeles)

David Watkin

Director Of Photography

Graeme Weston

1st Assistant Camera Operator

William F White

Camera And Lighting Equipment

David A. Whittaker

Sound Effects Editor

John Williamson

Stills

Kim Winther

2nd Assistant Director

Peter Roland Winther

Production Assistant (Boston)

Dan Wladyka

Set Decorator Assistant

Darryl A Wright

Unit Publicist

Elaine Yarish

Script Supervisor

Ron Zarilla

1st Camera Assistant (Boston)

Film Details

Also Known As
Good Mother, Le Prix de la passion, Prix de la passion, Le
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1988
Production Company
Massachusetts Film Office; Metrocolor; Ontario Film Development Corporation; Panavision, Ltd.; Silver Screen Partners Iv; Touchstone Pictures; Triad Music Inc; Walt Disney Company Studio Facilities
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Walt Disney Studios Distribution; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; Southern Ontario, Canada; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m

Articles

Teresa Wright (1918-2005)


Teresa Wright, a talented, Oscar&-winning leading lady of the '40s, and in later life, a versatile character player, died on March 6 at a New Haven, Connecticut hospital of a heart attack. She was 86.

She was born Muriel Teresa Wright in New York City on October 27, 1918. She showed a keen interest in acting in grade school, and by the time she was 19, she made her Broadway debut in Thorton Wilder's Our Town (1938); the following year she scored a hit as Mary, the weeping ingénue in Life with Father (1939). The word was out that New York had a superb young acting talent on hand, and Samuel Goldwyn soon brought her to Hollywood for William Wyler's adaptation of Lillian Hellman's The Little Foxes (1941). She scored an Oscar® nomination for her film debut as Regina Giddens' (Bette Davis), honorable daughter, Alexandria.

She maintained her amazing momentum by scoring two Oscar® nominations the following year for her next two films: as Carol Miniver in Wyler's Mrs. Miniver (Best Supporting Actress Category), and as Lou Gehrig's (Gary Cooper) faithful wife Ellie in Pride of the Yankees (Best Actress Category), and won the Oscar for Miniver. Yet for most fans of Wright's work, her finest hour remains her perfectly modulated performance as young Charlie in Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece, Shadow of a Doubt (1943). Wright's performance as the self-effacing, impressionable young niece who gradually realizes that her beloved uncle (Joseph Cotton) may have murdered several widows is effective since Wright's air of observation, subtly turns from idol gazing, to a watchful air of caution as the facts slowly being to unravel. 60 years on, fans of Hitchcock still acclaim Wright's performance as an integral part of the film's classic status.

She proved her talents in comedy with the delightful Casanova Brown (1944), but then saw her schedule slow down due to domesticity. After she married screenwriter Niven Busch in 1942, she gave birth to son, Niven Jr., in 1944, and took two years off to look after her family. She soon returned to film with another Wyler project, the Oscar®-winning, post war drama, The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), playing Fredric March's level-headed daughter, Peggy, she again took some time off after giving birth to her daughter, Mary in 1947. On her second attempt to return to the big screen, Wright found her popularity on the wane. Her wholesome image was in sharp contrast of the tougher, more modern women in post-war Hollywood, and her stubborn refusal to pose for any swimsuit or cheesecake photos to alter her image led to her release from Sam Goldwyn's contract.

As a freelance actress, Wright still found some good roles, notably as a young widow in the thriller scripted by her husband, in The Capture; and as a faithful fiancée trying to help Marlin Brandon deal with his amputation in Stanley Kramer's The Men (both 1950). Yet within a few years, she was playing middle-aged mothers in film like The Actress (1953), and The Track of the Cat (1954), even though she was still in her early '30s. By the mid-50s she found work in live television, where she could apply her stage training, in a number of acclaimed shows: Playhouse 90, General Electric Theater, Four Star Playhouse, and The United States Steel Hour.

She took a break from acting when she married her second husband, the playwright Robert Anderson in 1959, (she had divorced her first husband, Busch, in 1952) and was out of the public eye for several decades, save for an isolated theater appearance. When she did return, it was intermittent, but she was always worth watching. In James Ivory's Roseland (1977), a portrait of the New York dancehall; she was poignant as a talkative widow obsessed with her late husband; and as an enigmatic old actress in Somewhere in Time, she nearly stole the picture from leads, Christopher Reeve and Jayne Seymour. She was still active in the '90s, appearing a few hit shows: Murder, She Wrote, Picket Fences; and a final film role in John Grisham's The Rainmaker (1997). She is survived by her son, Niven; daughter, Mary; and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Teresa Wright (1918-2005)

Teresa Wright (1918-2005)

Teresa Wright, a talented, Oscar&-winning leading lady of the '40s, and in later life, a versatile character player, died on March 6 at a New Haven, Connecticut hospital of a heart attack. She was 86. She was born Muriel Teresa Wright in New York City on October 27, 1918. She showed a keen interest in acting in grade school, and by the time she was 19, she made her Broadway debut in Thorton Wilder's Our Town (1938); the following year she scored a hit as Mary, the weeping ingénue in Life with Father (1939). The word was out that New York had a superb young acting talent on hand, and Samuel Goldwyn soon brought her to Hollywood for William Wyler's adaptation of Lillian Hellman's The Little Foxes (1941). She scored an Oscar® nomination for her film debut as Regina Giddens' (Bette Davis), honorable daughter, Alexandria. She maintained her amazing momentum by scoring two Oscar® nominations the following year for her next two films: as Carol Miniver in Wyler's Mrs. Miniver (Best Supporting Actress Category), and as Lou Gehrig's (Gary Cooper) faithful wife Ellie in Pride of the Yankees (Best Actress Category), and won the Oscar for Miniver. Yet for most fans of Wright's work, her finest hour remains her perfectly modulated performance as young Charlie in Alfred Hitchcock's masterpiece, Shadow of a Doubt (1943). Wright's performance as the self-effacing, impressionable young niece who gradually realizes that her beloved uncle (Joseph Cotton) may have murdered several widows is effective since Wright's air of observation, subtly turns from idol gazing, to a watchful air of caution as the facts slowly being to unravel. 60 years on, fans of Hitchcock still acclaim Wright's performance as an integral part of the film's classic status. She proved her talents in comedy with the delightful Casanova Brown (1944), but then saw her schedule slow down due to domesticity. After she married screenwriter Niven Busch in 1942, she gave birth to son, Niven Jr., in 1944, and took two years off to look after her family. She soon returned to film with another Wyler project, the Oscar®-winning, post war drama, The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), playing Fredric March's level-headed daughter, Peggy, she again took some time off after giving birth to her daughter, Mary in 1947. On her second attempt to return to the big screen, Wright found her popularity on the wane. Her wholesome image was in sharp contrast of the tougher, more modern women in post-war Hollywood, and her stubborn refusal to pose for any swimsuit or cheesecake photos to alter her image led to her release from Sam Goldwyn's contract. As a freelance actress, Wright still found some good roles, notably as a young widow in the thriller scripted by her husband, in The Capture; and as a faithful fiancée trying to help Marlin Brandon deal with his amputation in Stanley Kramer's The Men (both 1950). Yet within a few years, she was playing middle-aged mothers in film like The Actress (1953), and The Track of the Cat (1954), even though she was still in her early '30s. By the mid-50s she found work in live television, where she could apply her stage training, in a number of acclaimed shows: Playhouse 90, General Electric Theater, Four Star Playhouse, and The United States Steel Hour. She took a break from acting when she married her second husband, the playwright Robert Anderson in 1959, (she had divorced her first husband, Busch, in 1952) and was out of the public eye for several decades, save for an isolated theater appearance. When she did return, it was intermittent, but she was always worth watching. In James Ivory's Roseland (1977), a portrait of the New York dancehall; she was poignant as a talkative widow obsessed with her late husband; and as an enigmatic old actress in Somewhere in Time, she nearly stole the picture from leads, Christopher Reeve and Jayne Seymour. She was still active in the '90s, appearing a few hit shows: Murder, She Wrote, Picket Fences; and a final film role in John Grisham's The Rainmaker (1997). She is survived by her son, Niven; daughter, Mary; and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 4, 1988

Began shooting April 15, 1988.

Released in United States Fall November 4, 1988