Street of Women


1h 10m 1932
Street of Women

Brief Synopsis

A property developer is torn between his wife and his mistress.

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Drama
Release Date
Jun 4, 1932
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Street of Women by Polan Banks (New York, 1931).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

Dress designer Natalie Upton has been having an affair with married architect Larry Baldwin for three years. Larry's wife Lois is interested only in social success and completely ignores Larry's interest in construction. Natalie, on the other hand, encourages and inspires Larry. When Natalie learns that her brother Clarke is returning from Paris, she tells Larry that they can no longer meet in her apartment. Natalie's friend, Linkhorn Gibson, known as Link, who is also in love with her, offers Clarke a job as an architect in his firm. Natalie turns down Link's invitation to a party at the Baldwins', but is surprised to find that Clarke has his own invitation. Natalie learns that Clarke met Larry's daughter Doris in Paris and is in love with her. Now that Doris is making her debut, Larry decides to ask Lois for a divorce. He tries to explain his actions to Doris, who is very upset, and when she learns that the other woman is Natalie, she runs from the room. After refusing to give Larry a divorce, Lois visits Natalie's shop to "have a look at her." When Natalie arrives home, she finds Doris there, waiting to beg her to break up with her father. Explaining that she and Clarke are engaged to be married, Doris insists that, to avoid scandal and humilation, Natalie and Larry must end their affair, and Natalie agrees. Clarke overhears Natalie end her relationship with Larry, and misunderstanding the nature of their arrangement, leaves the apartment, vowing to pay back the money he thinks Larry spent on his education. Clarke leaves the country, returning Natalie's letters and refusing to write to Doris. When Larry's building is opened, he thanks the woman who supported him, and only Natalie knows that he is referring to her. Clarke returns from South America, but still refuses to forgive Natalie. By accident he meets Doris in a nightclub and chases after her. Doris is so upset that she wrecks her car. Unable to reach Lois, Larry calls Natalie, who rushes to be with him while Doris is in danger. Shaken by the accident, Clarke forgives Natalie and he and Doris marry. When Link later proposes to Natalie, she tells him about her love for Larry. Unselfishly, Link convinces Lois to obtain a divorce and calls Larry with the good news.

Film Details

Genre
Romance
Drama
Release Date
Jun 4, 1932
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Street of Women by Polan Banks (New York, 1931).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Articles

Street of Women


Kay Francis continues the streak started with Scandal Sheet (1931) and Transgression (1931), dramatizing the travails of unfaithful (and well-dressed) women in this pre-code drama sold with the provocative tagline "Is love ever a sin?" Fashion designer Natalie Upton (Francis) and architect Larry Baldwin (Alan Dinehart) are a perfect match. Only problem is, Larry's still married -- and whatever loyalty he lost long ago towards wife Lois (Marjorie Gateson) he still feels towards daughter Doris (a pre-Titanic [1997] Gloria Stuart). But family intrigues and societal disapproval challenge their wish to be together. Will their love succumb to outside pressure? Or will the glamorous duo make a life together, their own way? Francis, who at the time was one of Warner Brothers' highest paid stars at $4,000 a week, embodies here what Jeanine Basinger described as "the absolute personification of what fashion and glamour meant to the woman's film of the 1930s."

By Violet LeVoit
Street Of Women

Street of Women

Kay Francis continues the streak started with Scandal Sheet (1931) and Transgression (1931), dramatizing the travails of unfaithful (and well-dressed) women in this pre-code drama sold with the provocative tagline "Is love ever a sin?" Fashion designer Natalie Upton (Francis) and architect Larry Baldwin (Alan Dinehart) are a perfect match. Only problem is, Larry's still married -- and whatever loyalty he lost long ago towards wife Lois (Marjorie Gateson) he still feels towards daughter Doris (a pre-Titanic [1997] Gloria Stuart). But family intrigues and societal disapproval challenge their wish to be together. Will their love succumb to outside pressure? Or will the glamorous duo make a life together, their own way? Francis, who at the time was one of Warner Brothers' highest paid stars at $4,000 a week, embodies here what Jeanine Basinger described as "the absolute personification of what fashion and glamour meant to the woman's film of the 1930s." By Violet LeVoit

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